Quarterly

The CSPA Quarterly is a publication arm of the Center for Sustainable Arts. It is meant to give a longer format and deeper space for exploration than some online platforms provide, and to reflect the myriad ways in which sustainability in the arts is discussed, approached and practiced. The publication features reviews, interviews, features, artist pages, essays, reflections and photos. It is a snapshot of a moment in time, a look at the many discussions in sustainability and the arts through the lens a particular theme. It is part of a rigorous dialogue.

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For only a few dollars a month, get four issues of the Quarterly a year-- as well as access to CSPA Reports and other benefits-- by subscribing on Patreon. Your subscriptions pay our Graphic Designer, allow us to provide print copies for contributors, fund CSPA efforts, and much more!

INDIVIDUAL ISSUES ON MAGCLOUD

To purchase individual print & digital issues, check out MagCloud. Quarterlies are print-on-demand, and come with free digital downloads, or you can purchase digital downloads separately.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Quarterly accepts open submissions for all upcoming issues on a rolling basis. We also approach individual contributors for material and guest editorships that creates a robust dialogue within a particular themed issue. Please email artist pages, reviews, process papers, conference reports, and essays to: moe@sustainablepractice.org.

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The Quarterly invites cross-platform advertising in order to support the production of our content and the connection of our readers to useful resources. If your organization, school or business is interested in advertising with us, you can check out Advertising Packages here, or purchase an Organizational Subscriber Membership (with additional fantastic perks!) on Patreon. Email moe@sustainablepractice.org for more info.

BACK ISSUES AVAILABLE ON JSTOR

The CSPA Quarterly archive is listed on the digital library JSTOR! Past issues are archived here, as part of their Sustainability Collection. Individuals and institutions must have a JSTOR membership in order to access. Does not include issues for the current year. We're thrilled about this expanded access for the Quarterly.

UPCOMING ISSUES

- Legibility, Issue Takeover by Calvin Rocchio

- Animating Ancestors, Guest Edited by Fereshteh Toosi

Issues

(Online) ISSN 2475-7764 (Print) ISSN 2165-753X

Q26: Walking

Q26: Walking

Guest Edited by Clare Qualmann, this edition of Quarterly thinks through its feet. Or rather it thinks through a human pace. A self-propelled pace. Many artists note the creative role of the walk in connecting them to the natural world, in developing their senses and sensibility to ecologies and environments.Whether conceived of as situation, or live art event, performance or guided tour, the walk-as-art is a distinct thread within walking arts practice that holds particular potential for connecting people, place and politics – for activating interconnections and operating as ‘real world’ intervention whilst simultaneously forefronting the aesthetic considerations of their artist creators.

 

Q25: Time and Attention

Q25: Time and Attention

In an era marked by myriad crises (ecosystem collapse, political and social unrest, growing economic inequity), CSPAQ Issue 25: Time and Attention compiles various frameworks, tactics, and propositions for tuning our attention and contextualizing our place in time. An experimental philosopher, prisoners, a child, and others contribute their diverse perspectives, collectively and constructively building a discourse for how we might direct our time and attention. Guest Edited by Ryan Thompson.

 


Q23: Frameworks

Q24: ISSUE TAKEOVER: Lab for Aesthetics and Ecology

Our first-ever issue takeover! The Laboratory for Aesthetics and Ecology takeover of the CSPA Quarterly proposes generative spaces of experiment and failure for a speculative, sustainable aesthetics. The issue grapples with the metaphors of compost and glutinous narratives. It paints with the eerily luminous colours of climate breakdown, and offers instructions for post-(r)evolutionary survival. It stays with the troubles of enlisting nonhumans as labourers of detraumatization, and presents cyborg witches as unholy guides towards reparative tactics for modest hope. Edited by Ida Bencke and Dea Antonson. Designed by Zille Bostinius.

 

Q23: Frameworks

Q23: Frameworks

This issue will look at the frameworks of artists working sustainably. It is a compilation of some outstanding artists’ initiatives, projects, residencies and proposals, regarding the various structures of support (economic, academic, programmatic) and considering how artists work to interrogate, improve and intervene in those frameworks of support. Guest Edited by MK Meador.

 

Q22: The Unknown & Uncertain

Q22: The Unknown & Uncertain

Sustainability is often discussed in terms of maintenance, or awareness-- engagements with the known. This issue asks a series of artists for their work and reflections on the vast expanse beyond the known-- from questions of nothingness, to existential crises, to attempts to anticipate the unexpected. How are creative practices sustained in the face of uncertain funding futures, or vast cultural shifts? How do the arts aid sustainability when change is vast, immediate, and unknown? How can we be certain that what we sustain will be useful?

 


Q21: Material Futures

Q21: Material Futures

Guest Edited by WhiteFeather Hunter, the Material Futures issue unpacks productive “troubling” of the processes and materials that creative fields and practitioners engage with. This troubling is done via re-visitation or reclamation of traditional art/ craft/ design methodologies and topics, as well as innovating within critical materiality, #futurecraft or future-now initiatives. Circular design, carbon negative/ zero waste production, materials science and biomaterials, and disruptive technologies are research-creation-production foci that mean to shift away from trends in over-consumption and the unsustainable towards recuperative, remedial, regenerative paradigms and practices.

 


Q20: Self Care

Q20: Self Care

For this, our 20th issue, we take a moment to look back at the history of the quarterly, and examine our own self-care, while inviting contributions from artists and thinkers who address self-care in their process and practice. How do we sustain ourselves, when everything around us demands sustenance? Featuring contributions from John K.Grande, Perdita Phillips, Ernesto Pujol, Sarah Berkeley, and more.

 


Q19: Queer Ecologies

Q19: Queer Ecologies

Queer ecologies slither through the wanton matteriality of naturecultures, including the perversity of electrons, the polyamorous tendrils of lightning, the deep futurity of plastic, the trans-species animacies of xeno-estrogens, and the polymorphous fecundity of holobiontism, and on and on and on. O yes yes yes. This issue invites you to writhe in the queer resistances of anti-normativity, anti-futurity and anti-reproductivity, the queer possibilities of performativity, diversity and kinship, and the precarity, intimacy and adaptability of evolutionary theories of sexual, natural and social selection and phenotypic plasticity. It slides through sustainability and slips into compostability, sifting through the transient, the fecund, the toxic, the permanent, the deviant, the perverse and the selective to unearth the spacetimematter of proliferation, extinction and thennowwhen. Guest edited by Tarsh Bates.

 


Q18: dis/sustain/ability

Q18: dis/sustain/ability

This Quarterly issue offers a diverse array of artistic responses and critical means for interrogating the overlaps of sustainability and disability-- and the relevance of conjoining these concepts in/for today’s world. Drawing on practitioners and scholars from three continents – some self-identifying as ‘disabled’, others not – this issue grapples with the neologistic tensions, hurdles and gifts of our cultural, social, economic and environmental propensities towards and with notions of disability. With contributions from Petra Kuppers, Stephanie Heit, Dee Heddon, Sue Porter, Neil Marcus, Sandi Yi, Ray Jacobs and Bree Hadley. Guest Edited by Bronwyn Preece.

 


Q17: Sense and Sensuality

Q17: Sense and Sensuality

What sustains our senses? Exploring firsthand experiences of nature, methods of non-human communication and harassment, and ideas of “ecosexuality,” this issue looks at sensory understandings of ecologies. With contributions from Annie Sprinkle, Dao Nguyen, The Plant Sex Consultancy, Pony Express, Sacha Kagan and more.

 


Q15: Hyperobjects

Q16: Expanded Scenography

In recent years, scenographic practice and performance design have increasingly moved beyond the theatre towards greater forms of hybridity. Possibilities are expanding to use scenographic strategies as a way of engaging with the world beyond the theatre. Can these practices play a role in revealing ecological complexity? Guest editors Tanja Beer and Ian Garrett curate a fascinating issue based on current practices in the field.

 


Q15: Hyperobjects

Q15: Hyperobjects

A look at Timothy Morton's concept of "Hyperobjects"-- viscous, nonlocal, phased and interobjective "things"-- through the lens of multiple artist practices. How are artists engaging with ideas and places so complex, they cannot be understood from a single vantage point? With contributions from Carol Padberg, Jessica Santone, Bethany Taylor, Sarah Knudtson, Liz Ensz, Timothy Morton, and more.

 


Q14: Cultural Vibrancy

Q14: Cultural Vibrancy

What does it mean to be culturally vibrant in the face of an escalating climate? How do we adapt to the continually evolving present? What changes, what moves? What is alive? A re-examination of the fourth and final pillar of sustainability-- culture-- this issue looks more deeply at the way art, activism and administration shape our relationship to ecologies. With contributions from Jane Bennett, Ian Garrett, Anne-Marie Melster, Elizabeth Orr, Julie's Bicycle, Guy Eytan, and Andrew Yang.

 


Q11: On Economy

Q13: On Social Equity

Third of a four-part series on the pillars of sustainability. What is social equity? How do art and performance define and address it? Focus on questions of access, material, meaning and communication in communities both human and non-. With contributions from Theresa May, A.Laurie Palmer, Ross Stanton Jordan, Kristina Wong, Corinne Erni and Anne-Marie Melster.

 


Q11: On Economy

Q12: On Environment

Though the environment is necessarily a key theme in a Quarterly devoted to sustainability, in this issue we take a particularly sharp focus on it. In particular, we examine environment in scenography, performance, art and theater. Part two of a four-part series on the four pillars of sustainability.

 


Q11: On Economy

Q11: On Economy

While many of our issues have featured work that is ecologically and environmentally engaged, in this issue, we will take a look at economic models in our cultural spheres. We’re particularly interested in new models & infrastructure, art work or performance staged in response to economy, and reflections on our current cultural state.

 


Q10: Our Tenth Issue!

Q10: Our Tenth Issue!

The tenth issue of the CSPA Quarterly is about renewing, refreshing, and rewinding. This issue contains content from contributors who were part of Issue #1, along with new perspectives. Contributors include Plantable (Megan Moe Beitiks, Bronwyn Preece, Lisa Woynarski), Linda Weintraub, Sam Goldblatt, Emily Theys with Dance Exchange, Olivia Cambell, and Thomas Rhodes, with featured artwork by Dianna Cohen.

 


Q9: Science/Art

Q9: Science/Art

Our issue on Science/Art features a preview of the CSPA Fusebox Festival study, writing from Sarah Moon and Alyce Santoro, a report from Moe Beitiks on the first annual Moscow Science Art Conference, and an excerpt from Lina Weintraub's new book. Through this issue, we explore the connection and complex relationship that exists between science and art.

 


Q8: International Issue: The Sea is Rising

Q8: International Issue: The Sea is Rising

Our third international issue focuses on projects that call attention to topics that extend well beyond national borders. With a focus on interdependence, and an abundance of contributions about water, ice, and sea rise, this issue addresses the space between national borders- our oceans. Featuring work from Moe Beitiks, Chantal Bilodeau, Eve Mosher, Michael Pinksy, Christopher Robbins, and Liz Ward.

 

Q7: On Art and Agriculture

Q7: On Art and Agriculture

Cultures around the world rely deeply on both local creativity and agricultural activity. Creative culture and agriculture are inextricably linked, and both are facing challenges as we globalize. This issue contains stories from public projects, visual installations, film, and theater, and examines local vegetable farming, cotton and rice paddy industries, and shrimpboating.

 

Q6: Making the Invisible Visible

Q6: Making the Invisible Visible

In the sixth issue of the CSPA Quarterly, we asked for work that allows what is typically invisible to the human eye to be visible, tangible, and understandable. Work came to us from Silke Walther & Thomas Rappaport, Jane D. Marsching, Christopher McNulty, Marissa Prefer, and Norm Magnusson.

 

Q5: International Action

Q5: International Action

Our fifth issue of the CSPA Quarterly called for work related to International Initiatives. Contributors include ARTPORT, Arts in the One World, Forum for the Future, Moe Beitiks, Roberta Holden, JB Kyabaggue and Emily Mendelsohn, and Shinji Turner-Yamamoto.

 

Q4: Summer 2010

Q4: Summer 2010

The summer edition of the CSPA Quarterly. In this issue we look at issues of sustainability around digital artwork. With articles and work from Adobe Systems, Chi-wang Yang, Adam Frank and others.

 

Q3: Spring 2010

Q3: Spring 2010

In this issue, we’re working against the stereotypes of the form, and attempting to broaden its term. As always, we’re exploring our chosen theme across disciplines and were delighted to include sculpture, visual art, theater, public art, and media art in the following pages. Instead of asking for…

 

Q2: Winter 2010

Q2: Winter 2010

Issue on International eco-policy and its relationship to art and culture, featuring work from Copenhagen during the United Nation's conference on climate change in December, 2009. Contributors include: Jessica Broderick Lewis, Ian Garrett, Aviva Rahmani, Miranda Wright, David Berridge, Rachel Lois…

 

Q2: Winter 2010

Q1: Fall 2009

This edition of The Quarterly explores sustainable arts practices in performance, visual art & installation, green touring, and eco-policy. Articles include ‘Code Green: A Comparative Look at Worldwide Cultural Policies for Green Events,’ by Sam Goldblatt. This edition’s featured artist is Dianna Cohen.

 

(Online) ISSN 2475-7764 (Print) ISSN 2165-753X

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