Yearly Archives: 2015

Opportunity: Mull Artist Residency – Thinking about Art & Sustainability

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

What will artists’ roles be in future societies? How might artistic practices have contributed to a greener, healthier, more equal planet?

Mull is a multi-disciplinary weekend-long residency which explores the links between artistic practice and environmental sustainability, considering what major challenges and changes might have taken place in the world in 50 years’ time and what steps artists may have taken to respond to or contribute to these shifts.

We’re looking for up to 10 artists to apply their curiosity and unique skills to imagining what being an artist in a sustainable future might look like – what that would mean, how it would affect artistic content, what infrastructure it would require in order to function and how artists and the arts will have shaped more sustainable societies. Creative Carbon Scotland is partnering with Comar on the beautiful Isle of Mull to mull over these complex questions with artists who may or may not have previously thought about environmental sustainability in relation to their work.

Background
Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to help shape a sustainable Scotland. We believe artists and cultural organisations have a significant role to play in envisioning, inspiring and influencing a more sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

Over the past two years we have initiated a number of artistically-focused projects including our first Mull Artist Residency (2014), an ongoing series of monthly artist discussions around arts and sustainability in Glasgow and Edinburgh (Green Tease), and contributing to a European network of similar organisations – the Green Art Lab Alliance – culminating in a three day meeting at Tramway in March 2015.

Building on this, Mull will invite artists to imagine what it would mean to marry creativity and environmental sustainability in their practice. The weekend will be led by facilitators – Professor Mike Bonaventura, CEO of the Crichton Carbon Centre, and Stephanie de Roemer, Conservator of sculpture and Installation Art for Glasgow Museums – but will also be steered by those taking part, recognising the relatively untrodden grounds of the questions we’re asking.

The residency has a number of objectives:

  • To provide artists, who may or may not have previously thought about environmental sustainability in their practice, with the space and stimuli to consider how it might drive new ways of working;
  • To collectively develop artists’, Creative Carbon Scotland’s and Comar’s thinking about how environmental sustainability can be engaged with in different artistic practices on practical and conceptual levels.
  • To nurture and build a creative community of practice which embeds environmental sustainability at its core.

What will it involve?
Taking the United Nations post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals as a starting point, Mull asks how the world might look in 50 years’ time and what role artists might play in the changes to come as well as what unique skills they can bring to this new context. Considering approaches to making art, as well the actual content and the infrastructure it lives within, we’ll work to imagine the future and understand the necessary steps towards it to stimulate some initial responses to these questions.

What we’re looking for
We’re looking for inquisitive artists who can bring big ideas to a group setting and who are keen to ask questions of themselves and established ways of working. The residency is open to artists from any discipline, whether or not they have previously considered environmental sustainability in their approach to working. Applicants must be based in Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland has a rigorous Equalities Policy and we will welcome applications from artists with disabilities and those from Black and minority ethnic backgrounds. The nature of the journey to Mull and some of the activities we plan may present difficulties for some people with limited mobility but we will make every effort to overcome these and urge all to apply – we will discuss any details once the initial selection has been made.

What to expect
Artists should expect a relatively open-format two days with facilitation by the group as well as Mike and Stephanie. There may be the opportunity for some artists to lead a ‘session’ during the weekend, bringing a particular response or angle to theme of environmental sustainability and artistic practice. Artists will not be expected to develop or produce anything specific during the two days– the residency is about being thoughtful. We will hold a number of discussion sessions as a group across the weekend, as well as a bigger public discussion in Tobermory on the Saturday night, and will make a visit to a site of relevance on one of the two days.

The residency will take place from Friday 27th – Monday 30th March 2015 at Comar on Isle of Mull, leaving Edinburgh and/or Glasgow around midday on 27th and returning mid-afternoon on 30th March. Participants will be paid £250 for their attendance and travel expenses from within Scotland, accommodation and catering will be covered by Creative Carbon Scotland.

Application
Please read this section carefully and make sure you send the right information with your application. Applications should include the following information:

  • Name and contact details (including email address)
  • A short biography or CV
  • Some examples of your works or links to them online or related material (for example reviews etc. if your work is not able to be distributed online)
  • A short outline of why you would like to take part and what you hope to gain from taking part (500 words max)
  • A short proposal for a ‘session’ you might lead during the residency in response to the question or a future artwork/project which engages with either of these questions: ‘What will artists’ roles be in future societies?’ ‘How might artistic practices have contributed to a greener, healthier, more equal planet?’ (500 words max)
  • A completed Equalities Monitoring Form (this will not be considered as part of your application). Please download our Equalities Monitoring Form here.

Please send these different elements in one zip folder, apart from the Equalities Monitoring Form which should be sent separately, to Gemma Lawrence at gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com by 12am on Tuesday 3rd March.

Photo credit: Jake Bee, www.jakebee.com.

The post Opportunity: Mull Artist Residency – Thinking about Art & Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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UNFIX festival call for submissions

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from CCA Glasgow

UNFIX is a new festival of Performance and Ecology taking place at CCA Glasgow from 10 – 12 July 2015. We are seeking proposals for live performances, films, installations and workshops that resonate with ecological crisis / renewal and conscious physicality.

UNFIX takes ecology to mean all the ways in which we are interdependent on each other, our surroundings, our bodies and psyches.

Why have a festival of Performance and Ecology?

The theme aims to identify an untapped resource for artists and will make UNFIX the first Scottish festival of its kind. Ecology is perhaps the grand theme of our times, uniting issues of climate change, sustainability, political independence / inter-dependence, and the various flows of ageing, economics, culture and emotion. Rather than restricting itself to ‘environmental art’, UNFIX will take a broad definition of the term and include ecologies of Imagination (the connections between the ideas, myths, dreams and archetypes we live by), Politics, Environment, Soul and Mental Health (the ecology of the individual psyche and questions of balance, physical maintenance and happiness; ecologies of emotion and the forces of love, conflict, anger, shame).

This wide net is intended as an offer to Scottish and International artists to find methods of rethinking human inter-relationships and environmental approaches through our bodies and physical sense of living, both in daily life and the concentrated forums of performance and culture. We can no longer pretend to be separate from one another, and we cannot continue as we have been. It’s time to unfix.

How to Apply

Please download the application details from the CCA Glasgow website. The deadline for submission is Monday 9 March 2015.

The post UNFIX festival call for submissions appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Summer Internships with Creative Carbon Scotland

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

creative_carbon_scotlandWe are looking for final-year students or graduates from these universities to take on the roles of Production Assistant and Environmentalist/Blogger-in-residence.

The Production Assistant intern will provide support in delivering the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Production Award and Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days, assistance with the Green Arts Initiative, as well as other artistic and informative events on sustainability in the summer Festivals.

The Environmentalist/Blogger-in-residence intern will cover the summer Edinburgh Festivals and research the environmental aspects of the summer Festivals (Edinburgh International Festival, Edinburgh Art Festival, Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Edinburgh Mela, Edinburgh International Book Festival). This role entails writing and creating copy for a dedicated blog/website.

More information about both opportunities can be found through the University of Edinburgh Careers Portal or University of St Andrews Careers Centre. Please note that these opportunities are only open to students or recent graduates from the aforementioned universities.

The post Summer Internships with Creative Carbon Scotland appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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GALA Member Spotlight: DutchCulture|TransArtists

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

GALA is a partnership between 19 cultural organisations that has enabled a collaborative investigation of the role of environmental sustainability for the arts and design sectors. In March 2015, the Green Art Lab Alliance (GALA) will be meeting for its third and final meeting in Glasgow.

This week, we heard from Mareile Zuber (DutchCulture|TransArtists) about her thoughts on the GALA project.

CCS: What organisation do you represent in GALA and how did you find yourself involved?

Mareile Zuber (MZ)DutchCulture|TransArtists is the centre for international cultural cooperation in the Netherlands. Among other issues related to international cultural collaboration, we focus on residencies. Through our work we are stimulating and strengthening artists’ mobility in the Netherlands and internationally. We facilitate to share expertise and offer tools and services on artist-in-residence programs and related issues. In the last years sustainability came up as a trending topic within the residency field and together with Julie’s Bicycle we took the initiative for this project. DutchCulture is the coordinator of the European project Green Art Lab Alliance, responsible for the administration of the project, but also facilitating the partners to find strategic partnerships and creating a well functioning network.

CCS: What is the significance of GALA to you and how has the project contributed to your work?

MZ: Working in the cultural sector and focusing on sustainability means pioneering, at least in the Netherlands. That’s why it is so important (to me personally, DutchCulture in particular and cultural organisations in general) to have international partners, to exchange ideas and best practices. Through the GALA project the various definitions (based on cultural differences and contexts), challenges and opportunities and ways of dealing with sustainability in the arts became much clearer to me. The growing network of organisations joining and supporting GALA and the great spin-off of the activities show that there is interest and urgency to collaborate on this issue. We hope that the GALA project can be a catalyst for activities/initiatives that have been started in the Netherlands and that through international exchange, we will bring sustainability to the cultural national agenda.

CCS: What is your favourite memory, moment, discussion or thought that you’ve taken from past GALA general meetings?

MZ: What is really amazing within the GALA project and partnership is the great enthusiasm of all partners. Even partners that were not sustainability experts when we started felt the urgency to do something and got inspired by the work of the others. It is so nice to see that there is such a great openness and willingness to share knowledge and to collaborate. The activities that have been realised and the multiple spin-offs from the project are amazing. There has been a lot of attention drawn to GALA from different regions of the world that I would have never expected.

CCS: What role(s) do you think the arts/artists can play in building a more sustainable society?

MZ: Science won’t win over the climate change sceptics – this has been proven in the last years. The facts are there, but some still don’t get the message…artists have the power to reach out to the hearts of people and can translate the facts to our daily lives. So in this sense the role of the arts is crucial to build a more sustainable society.

CCS: What are your hopes for the final GALA general meeting in Glasgow this coming March?

MZ: I hope that we will find ways to continue the joint efforts of the GALA partners for a more sustainable cultural sector. It would be great of we could create new partnerships and collaborations, further building on our network.

The post GALA Member Spotlight: DutchCulture|TransArtists appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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A SPECIAL “OCEANS” PRIZE IN THE COAL PRIZE ART AND ENVIRONMENT 2015

The COAL Art and Environment Prize, dedicated this year to the climate (a national priority in 2015) will be awarded for the 6th consecutive year to an artist selected from 10 finalists, for an art project concerning the climate. The Ocean occupies 71% of the surface of the planet, but is often conspicuously absent from the engagements made by states in climate negotiations. It should be major factor! To place the ocean at the center of the debate, Tara Expéditions et the COAL Association are launching a special “Oceans” prize for the COAL Art and Environment 2015 competition. The winning artist will be awarded a residency aboard Tara during an expedition in the Pacific Ocean.

Special Award “Oceans”

The winner of this special prize will spend a month aboard TARA, a legendary boat built for extreme conditions, during a mission entitled “Coral Reefs Facing Global Change on the Planet.” The expedition will take place from 2016 to 2018 in the Pacific Ocean, particularly in the Coral Triangle of Southeast Asia. The expedition aims to understand the evolution of coral reefs – vital hotspots of marine biodiversity that are currently confronting rapid changes in demography and climate. This special “Oceans” Prize will be awarded to an artistic project engaged in saving the oceans in light of current climate issues.

The COAL Art and Environment Prize 2015 – Objective COP21

Since 2010, the COAL Art & Environment Prize has been revealing the richness of responses brought by artists to address current environmental problems. Each year the awards honor 10 projects related to environmental issues, selected through an international call for projects. This year the COAL Art and Environment Prize is dedicated to the theme of climate – to inspire the COP21, and offer the general public and policy makers highly creative and unusual ways to understand the complexity of climate change.

The winner of the COAL Art and Environment Prize 2015 will receive a grant of 5,000 euros and a residency at the Domaine de Belval, owned by the François Sommer Foundation.

The winner of the special “Oceans” Prize will embark aboard TARA in 2016, during an expedition in the Pacific Ocean.

This sixth edition of the COAL Prize Art and Environment is part of ArtCOP21, an exceptional cultural festival initiate by COAL and our UK partners Cape Farewell, that will take place in France during COP21. ArtCOP21 is an unprecedented collaboration of cultural actors who are keen to instigate an ecological transition towards a healthier environment – through arts and culture. The mission of ArtCOP21 is to engage the wider public in creating a positive vision for a sustainable future.

The call for proposals is open until February 28, 2015, midnight

Download the call for entries

SCHEDULE

Application deadline : February 28th, 2015 at midnight.

The COAL Prize will be awarded in Autumn 2015.

You’re Invited! Light Gate Artist Reception

This post comes to you from Green Public Art

We are pleased to announce a reception for the artists, Lajos Heder and Mags Harries, on Wednesday, February 25 from 4:00-6:00pm in celebration of their public artwork, Light Gate.

Dedication
4:00 PM
14th Street and Highland Avenue, Manhattan Beach, CA

Artist Presentation
Mags Harries and Lajos Héder
5:00 PM
Police/Fire Conference Room
420 15th Street, Manhattan Beach, CA

Light Gate is located at the top of 14th Street, between City Hall and the new library, along Highland Avenue in Manhattan Beach, CA. The artwork is made of glass, laminated with prismatic lighting film that will create rich and varied light effects with the sun. Light Gate will focus the view through an opening down 14th Street to the Ocean.

It will be a place of constantly shifting light and view, more than a solid object. It will put the visitor in the center of this important nexus. As you move around and through the sculpture, it will shift unexpectedly from transparency, to prismatic refraction, to mirror reflection. The glass and steel construction playing with the sunlight will harmonize with the crystalline glass architecture of the new library.

For more information on the dedication ceremony, please contact the Parks and Recreation Department at (310) 802-5448.

The post You’re Invited! Light Gate Artist Reception appeared first on Green Public Art.

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Rebecca Ansert, founder of Green Public Art, is an art consultant who specializes in artist solicitation, artist selection, and public art project management for both private and public agencies. She is a graduate of the master’s degree program in Public Art Studies at the University of Southern California and has a unique interest in how art can demonstrate green processes or utilize green design theories and techniques in LEED certified buildings.

Green Public Art is a Los Angeles-based consultancy that was founded in 2009 in an effort to advance the conversation of public art’s role in green building. The consultancy specializes in public art project development and management, artist solicitation and selection, creative community involvement and knowledge of LEED building requirements. Green Public Art also works with emerging and mid-career studio artists to demystify the public art process. The consultancy acts as a resource for artists to receive one-on-one consultation before, during, and after applying for a public art project.

Go to Green Public Art

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‘Glasgow’s Green: Imagining a Sustainable City’ Programme Announced!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Glasgow’s Green: Imagining a Sustainable City is part of the final general meeting of the Green Art Lab Alliance, an EU funded project which brings together 19 artistic and cultural partners from across Europe to explore the concept of sustainability in practical, ethical and artistic ways.

We’ve gathered an exciting mix of artists, designers and makers to transform Tramway into a green arts hub for the final day of the Green Art Lab Alliance 2015 general meeting. Workshops and drop-ins will be led by Angharad McLaren, Beth Shapeero, Catrin Evans, Dress for the Weather, Ellie Harrison, Harry Giles, Katrine Turner, Make Works, MAKLAB, Penny Anderson, Translocal, Whirlybird Theatre, Martin Campbell, Reuben Ewan and Zoë Pearson and Pollinaria (with even more workshop announcements coming soon!).

The workshops are free and open to all, but we ask that you please register. Further workshop information and registration links can be found at the Glasgow’s Green: Imagining a Sustainable City programme page.

The post ‘Glasgow’s Green: Imagining a Sustainable City’ Programme Announced! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Edinburgh Green Tease: Art+Culture+Food with The Dinner Lab

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

At this month’s Green Tease, Allison Palenske (CCS social media officer and MFA candidate at ECA) will be presenting her work to-date on her project The Dinner Lab, a platform for the investigation of the cultural and ecological histories of food production.

We will meet at the Edinburgh Larder Café (15 Blackfriars Street, Edinburgh EH1 1NB) at 4pm to begin an artist-led walking tour of the locations where the city’s markets once thrived, combined with edible “field” samples from local producers. The walking tour will conclude at Tent Gallery with a discussion about the artist’s role in food systems thinking, also offering participation in the final session of URBANE- an interdisciplinary participatory exhibition exploring our urban relationship to food.

This session will provide a glance into Allison’s work-in-progress, offering an opportunity to contribute your thoughts toward the future of the project!

As always, Green Tease is open to anyone who’s interested in how the arts can help contribute to a more sustainable city so please pass this on to anyone else you think might like to join us.

Please RSVP via Eventbrite by 24th February. We look forward to seeing you there!

The post Edinburgh Green Tease: Art+Culture+Food with The Dinner Lab appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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WATERWASH and the Zen Art of Sustainability

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Workshop with the New York artist Lillian Ball (in English)

March 1st 2015, from 2:30pm to around 6pm
Künstlerhaus Hannover, Maestrosaal, Sophienstraße 2, 30159 Hanover (Germany)

lillian-ballParticipation is free of charge but only by pre-registration (limited to 26 persons) at  janika.millan@hannover–stadt.de

Organized by the Department of Cultural Organization at the Leuphana University Lueneburg, in collaboration with the Cultural Office of the City of Hanover

Workshop description by the artist:

„Working to have a positive effect as an environmental artist and activist, I have thought long and hard about potential ways to make an impact that encourages stakeholder action. How can appreciation of place engender public involvement? What kind of visual strategies reinforce the scientific and ethical values protecting natural spaces? The need for a sustainable approach to erosion control and revitalization of areas challenged by climate change is urgent in waterfront areas worldwide.

The WATERWASH® series is one effort to ask and answer these questions. Both of the completed WATERWASH projects merge public art, social practice, and storm water pollution remediation. This workshop will present recent work, screen Bronx River WATERWASH (a 50 minute documentary by Reorient Films) and discuss the options available to us all as citizens.

How can we possibly measure a place’s value to its inhabitants? What kind of place making experience or philosophy encourages people towards ecosystem protection? Landscape can activate the gap between form and function, inspiring opportunities for artists, scientists, and public officials to restore human as well as natural environments.”

“A garden is never finished” Shunryu Suzuki

 

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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