Yearly Archives: 2014

Ghosts of the Gulf by Brandon Ballengée at the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

Currently on view at the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries is an exhibition I’ve organized with artist/biologist Brandon Ballengée. The exhibition titled Ghosts of the Gulf includes several stark and brilliantly colorful images of marine species collected in the Gulf of Mexico directly following the deadly 2010 Deep Water Horizons (DWH) oil spill disaster. Ballengée will give a talk about his work and a reception will take place on Saturday, December 13 from 5 – 7 pm at the BIRE gallery on Main Street in Beacon, NY. Register here.

Ballengée’s artistic and scientific inquiry has focused on the rapid decline of amphibian populations around the world and the occurrence of developmental deformities among amphibians. He has received international attention for this work as well as his scientific research publications. Ballengée’s work as a biologist looks at amphibians as bio-indicator species, particularly their development in complex ecosystems and the proximate causes for developmental deformities among wild populations. “Understanding amphibians at this point in history is very important as they are suffering from rapid wide-spread population declines at over 40% in less than half a century” said Ballengée. Though the Gulf of Mexico species depicted in Ghosts of the Gulf do not appear to show deformities, Ballengée, hypothesizes as to why; “The subjects in Ghosts were found shortly after the spill so do not have any obvious morphological abnormalities, however we don’t know what the long term impacts of the spill yet will be, on these species or even our own”. These images of species once common to the Gulf, represents a creative process that blurs the lines between art and biology. Ballengée’s specimen-subjects transition from their once living state to brightly colored x-rays revealing the complex architectural anatomy of these beautiful and vanishing species.

It’s very exciting to be partnering on an exhibition of such importance as Ballengée’s Ghosts of the Gulf with the Beacon Institute, an environmental research nonprofit engaging scientists, engineers, and environmentalists, to apply diverse intellectual and physical resources to the water challenges of the 21st century. I’ve been fortunate in having the opportunity to work with Ballengée several times over the past 12 years beginning with my pioneering exhibition and book Ecovention in 2002 at the Center for Contemporary Art in Cincinnati. In 2007 I collaborated with Ballengée and the Central Park Arsenal Gallery, Audubon and The Nature Conservancy on Silent Migration, an exhibition focused on the 300 species of birds that migrate through New York City each year. I included Ballengée in my public exhibition BiodiverCITY, which took place in Washington D.C. in 2012 as part of the 5 x 5 public art exhibition hosted by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Ballengée constructed one of his signature works, Love Motel For Insects, an outdoor light installation that formed giant dragonfly wings out of fabric using ultra-violet lights to attract insects at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. More recently I curated The Cryptic Ones, Salamander Portraits by Ballengee and Stanley K. Session at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education in Philadelphia.

The 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill was the largest environmental disaster in the history of the United States, with devastating impacts to one of the most important and biologically diverse habitats in the world: the Gulf of Mexico. Ghosts of the Gulf is on display at Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, Clarkson University now through March 8, 2015. The images are courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York City.

———-

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

Powered by WPeMatico

An Open Letter in the Dark | The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination

“We are sorry it has taken so long to get back to you, but this letter has not been an easy one to write and things have been difficult here. We are also sorry that what began as a letter has perhaps become a long “manifesto against a world that we hate” (to quote one of the lines in your festival’s statement of purpose).” continue reading …

https://labofii.wordpress.com/2014/10/28/an-open-letter-in-the-dark/

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Art in the Anthropocene | Xavier Cortada

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Global View of the Arctic and Antarctic on September 21, 2005. Courtesy NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC).

The introduction to the current issue of the Journal American Art takes as its starting point Astrid, a work by Xavier Cortada. “The works were made in Antarctica, about Antarctica, using Antarctica as the medium (provided to me by the very researchers who inform us about Antarctica).”

The Introduction goes on to open up a series of key issues for both art and for ecocriticism in the Anthropocene. Read on here http://cortada.com/press/2014/AmericanArt

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Broadway Award

This post comes to you from the Broadway Green Alliance

The Broadway League and the Broadway Green Alliance are pleased to announce the creation of a new award to be given at the League Biennial to a League member acknowledging their environmental leadership.

The first award is to be made at the February 8, 2015 Biennial.

The Green Broadway Award honors an individual, show, organization for outstanding achievement in making Broadway (in NewYork or on the road) more environmentally friendly.

The winning nominee will have demonstrated outstanding achievement in bringing environmentally friendlier practices to Broadway.

Achievements may include:

• Use of energy saving technology or greener products in a facility or production
• Innovative design using greener materials
• Reduction of waste and improved reuse and recycling of materials
• Support for environmentally friendly initiatives by others, including investments in offsets and greener energy
• Communicating to others about greener initiatives and effecting actions

The jury for the award will be announced shortly. Anyone can nominate a League member or production associated with the League for this award. Nominations are due by January 10, 2015. Nominations should include the name of the nominee, the name of the nominator, and a description of why you are recommending your nominee for this prize. Attachments – including photographs, short videos, or spreadsheets — are permitted. Please submit your nominations to green@broadway.org.

———-

The Broadway Green Alliance was founded in 2008 in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council. The Broadway Green Alliance (BGA) is an ad hoc committee of The Broadway League and a fiscal program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Along with Julie’s Bicycle in the UK, the BGA is a founding member of the International Green Theatre Alliance. The BGA has reached tens of thousands of fans through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other media.

At the BGA, we recognize that it is impossible to be 100% “green” while continuing activity and – as there is no litmus test for green activity – we ask instead that our members commit to being greener and doing better each day. As climate change does not result from one large negative action, but rather from the cumulative effect of billions of small actions, progress comes from millions of us doing a bit better each day. To become a member of the Broadway Green Alliance we ask only that you commit to becoming greener, that you name a point person to be our liaison, and that you will tell us about your green-er journey.

The BGA is co-chaired by Susan Sampliner, Company Manager of the Broadway company of WICKED, and Charlie Deull, Executive Vice President at Clark Transfer<. Rebekah Sale is the BGA’s full-time Coordinator.

Go to the Broadway Green Alliance

Powered by WPeMatico

Sustainability and Film: Creative Scotland Film Strategy 2014-2017

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Scotland has recently published their Film Strategy for 2014-2017. The strategy includes the context and ambitions of contemporary Scottish film, alongside Creative Scotland’s role in implementing a strategy to better support the industry in meeting these ambitions.

Amongst the key priorities mentioned in the report, sustainability has gained a growing role in the industry. Priorities included in the report involve the establishment of a sustainable film studio and an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable future for the industry in Scotland. Creative Carbon Scotland is identified as a partner in helping to “raise awareness of environmental and sustainability issues affecting the screen sector“.

Natalie Usher, Director of Film and Media at Creative Scotland, says of the strategy-This is an ambitious Strategy for film in Scotland. It sets out our aim to make Scotland home to a vibrant, culturally diverse and commercially-competitive film sector.”

To read the entire report, please visit the Creative Scotland website.

Our website offers various tools and resources for those in the film industry to start devising and implementing sustainability strategies- click to access “Making Screen Sustainable” for standards and resources on the topic of greening film and screen.

The post Sustainability and Film: Creative Scotland Film Strategy 2014-2017 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Tease Glasgow: Govanhill Baths with artist-in-residence Ailie Rutherford

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Join us 16th December from 4-6pm at the Govanhill Baths in Glasgow with artist in residence Ailie Rutherford for a teatime discussion about the future.

During her residency Ailie has been hosting a series of discussions about the future. These discussions will inform the creation of new a artwork, Future Archive, for Govanhill Baths. To coincide with the Baths’ Centenary Ailie’s residency is focussing on the next 100 years, looking at what role the Baths will play as a central hub and how local community might develop by 2114.

Building on previous discussions, Ailie will lead us to consider themes of community ownership, communal living, resource consumption and how new technologies might alter the way we live.

We hope you can join us for tea, coffee and mince pies to see off 2014!

Please RSVP to gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com

The post Green Tease Glasgow: Govanhill Baths with artist-in-residence Ailie Rutherford appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Imagination as muse

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Anaïs Tondeur, Depth Sounders, 2014, mixed rayogram techniques, C-Print, 24 x 11 cm, Image Courtesy of GV Art

This is not a review of Lost in Fathoms, Anaïs Tondeur’s current solo show at London’s GV Art Gallery, through 29 November. Several excellent reviews of this riveting installation have already been published elsewhere by Johanna Kieniewicz, Ruth GardeTom Jeffreys and Margaret Harris.

I must live vicariously through their words, for I was not one of the lucky ones to see this show in person. I will use my imagination – as Anaïs would surely appreciate – to visualize walking slowly through the multiple layers of her installation, lost in thought, seduced by the compelling narrative and search for meaning of the mysterious disappearance of the volcanic island of Nuuk. Somewhere in the North Atlantic. Sometime in 2012.

The Anthropocene, which is the inspiration behind Anaïs’s brilliant masterpiece, forces me to re-examine my initial impulse to hop on a plane in order to see this fascinating show. So instead of crossing the big pond, I spent a delightful bilingual hour Skyping with Anaïs in her Paris studio. As a photographer originally trained in the biological sciences, I wanted to understand the source of Anaïs’ fluency across multiple scientific disciplines: she regularly collaborates with geologists, geophysicists, oceanographers, hydro-physicists, even historians and philosophers.

Like shifting tectonic plates, Anaïs’ destiny was shaped by the fusion of art and science. The daughter of an artist and a geophysicist, she initially gravitated toward the sciences, but later decided to “move through the arts.” Her creativity seems to “come naturally from these two worlds. I think I’ve made the right choice, where I’m still really interested by questions and issues tackled by science, but I engage with them through an artistic approach.”

Another profound influence on Anaïs’ spirit of enquiry was the Rudolf Steiner (Waldorf) system in which she was schooled in France. Fostering both creative and analytical modes of understanding, the Waldorf school “opened up the world to me in a very creative way.” Imagination became her muse.

“This was such a beautiful gift, to start my life by,” she explained. “All children are naturally creative, but once structure is imposed onto them, their creativity fades away. Not in the Waldorf system: creativity is emphasized. It’s about giving tools to the child to help him find his way, at his own pace, where he wants to go, who he is. To help him blossom.”

It is clear that Anaïs continues to grow and blossom. Her work is simultaneously strong and delicate, mysterious and thought-provoking. Through her ongoing international collaborations with a wide range of scientists, she straddles the two worlds seamlessly, and in the process has created a new art form: one that organically weaves together science, art and fiction in order to open up new ways of understanding, new possibilities for solving a variety of social and environmental problems – health, education, food, energy – including climate change.

Approaches like hers will become increasingly relevant in the Anthropocene: we urgently need new tools to improve our understanding of the Anthropocene and ways to solve climate change. Using art, fiction and storytelling may be one way to do this, as it allows audiences to take some distance from the real world, from our usual patterns of engaging with the world, so that we can reflect back on reality from a new perspective.

“For me, it is quite important to work with fiction,” explained Anaïs. “This fiction gives some space and some freedom to open new potentialities.” According to Tom Jeffreys, fiction is often critical to our ability to access or create truth, and indeed may be actually a fundamental component of it.

Which brings us back to the profound influence that the Waldorf school has had on Anaïs’ unique artistic contribution in this age of rapid climate change:  through art and fiction, Anaïs creates a new space in which her scientific collaborators can question their own methodology, their own research, their own conclusions, imagine new possibilities.

Ruth Garde says it better than I: Science is not about getting answers; it’s about finding questions.

According to Anaïs: “It is so crucial to the future of the planet that all layers of the society (my emphasis) need to be engaged, need to reflect together on what do we want to do.”

At the end of our conversation, when asked what gives her hope, Anaïs hesitated before responding:

“Thinking so much about the Anthropocene, maybe I don’t have much hope… But I am inspired by all these movements where people from so many different disciplines meet to discuss and try to imagine together what to do in the future. I think that is the start of a big change, and I hope that we can continue in that direction.  In fact, it’s quite exciting to be living at such a turning point. It’s from here that we have so much to reinvent.”

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Follow Joan on Twitter

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Lead Artist/Sculptor for FANK project

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Comar is a multidisciplinary arts centre and commissioning agency on the Isle of Mull. We are looking to appoint a sculptor to produce an artwork that will be integrated and permanently installed at the site of a large dry-stone enclosure deep in Lettermore Forest.

Initiated by artist Emma Herman-Smith, the project FANK will see the restoration and repurposing of a derelict sheefold (or ‘fank’ in Scots dialect) on the Isle of Mull. Work is already underway to rebuild the structure. Once complete the site will link the island’s landscape and social heritage to its cultural present.

The successful artist should have experience of working on public art projects of a similar scale. Ideally they should also have experience of working with schools and community groups.

FANK is supported by Creative Scotland, Heritage Lottery Fund, and Historic Scotland.

BACKGROUND

Scattered across Mull are the remains of crofting settlements that speak of the island’s history prior to the clearances, a time that saw the population reduce to a third. The remnants of the fank one can see strewn in Lettermore Forest exemplifies the large-scale sheep farming that replaced these communities. Yet that time, too, has passed.

The Forestry Commission land on which the project will take place is currently being harvested, further altering the familiar landscape of the past 50 years.

FANK acknowledges the culture of changing land use whilst providing a venue in which to encourage social engagement and to celebrate Scotland’s natural heritage.

ARTIST’S RESPONSIBILITIES

• To produce an artwork to be permanently installed at the site of the project, Lettermore Forest, Isle of Mull.
• To design and deliver a series of practical workshops with young people from schools on Mull.
• To work collaboratively with Comar’s Exhibitions Team on the preparation and delivery of a programme of events.

To learn more about the opportunity, including how to apply, please visit the Artist Opportunity page on Comar’s website here.


Image: Comar

 

The post Opportunity: Lead Artist/Sculptor for FANK project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico