Yearly Archives: 2014

Notes from Underground: The Depths of Environmental Arts, Culture and Justice

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE)
Eleventh Biennial Conference, June 23- 27, 2015
University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho

THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE (INCLUDING SUBMISSIONS PAGE) WILL BE LIVE IN SEPTEMBER, 2014: www.uidaho.edu/asle

ASLELogo2013In Notes from Underground (1864), Dostoyevsky explores relations between modernity and its discontents at an important historical conjuncture: the novella’s unnamed, unpleasant hero rails against capitalist industry, imperialist architecture and an emerging social scientific understanding of human behaviour premised on predictability and knowability. By writing from the underground – from the subterranean, from the murk, from the world of refuse – Dostoyevsky asks us to consider the importance of experiences that lie beneath (and both before and after) the shiny edifices of progress, rationality and industry. But the “underground” also asks us to consider what lies beneath us much more literally: crust, tectonic plates, magma, minerals, fossil fuels, aquifers, lakes, caves, fungal networks, clay, compost, worms, ants, nematodes, roots, rhizomes, tubers, seeds, warrens, nests, vaults, graves, landfills, nuclear weapons and waste, buried treasure. In this act of collection – underground elements, underground agents, underground movements, underground epistemologies – we hope to draw attention to the multiple ways in which things underground and the institutions that variously cultivate, harness and contain them, are constantly changing the terrain (literally and politically) on which we stand.

Especially in the midst of such widespread focus on atmospheric climate change, perhaps we also need to look down, under, beneath and below for imaginative aesthetic, critical, pedagogical and activist responses? At our current political and ecological conjuncture, the literal underground is very much the subject of contest – extraction, pollution, depletion, neoliberalisation, cultivation, sovereignty, equity, (re)claiming – suggesting the need for creative new ways of engaging in activism, reading, writing and education in these networks of depth:underground arts, humanities, ecocriticism, justice. For the 2015 ASLE conference, we seek proposals for panels, papers, performances, discussions, readings and roundtables that address this constellation of undergrounds. We invite participants to interpret the conference theme as broadly as possible and to imagine their work in terms not only of underground content but also of subterranean form: we particularly encourage non-traditional modes of presentation, including hybrid, performative and collaborative works; panels that minimize formal presentation in favour of engaged emergent discussion; interdisciplinary approaches; environmentally inflected (earthy?) readings of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, film, theatre and other media; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, teachers, practitioners, activists and colleagues in the social and natural sciences.

All proposals must be submitted by December 7, 2014. We will evaluate your proposal carefully and notify you of its final status by February 15, 2015.

The list of keynote speakers includes Donna Haraway, Linda Hogan, Stephanie LeMenager, Ann Fisher-Wirth, Jorge Navarro, Anna Tsing, Rita Wong, and Tanure Ojaide.

For questions about the program, please contact 2015 ASLE President Cate Sandilands at ASLE2015@yorku.ca. For questions about the conference site, field sessions, progressive event and other local activities, please contact the conference site hosts at asle2015host@uidaho.edu. For questions about ASLE and membership, please contact Amy McIntyre, ASLE Managing Director, at info [at] asle [dot] org.

Read or download the full CFP: http://www.asle.org/site/conferences/biennial/ or http://www.asle.org/assets/docs/ASLE_Conferences_2015CFP.pdf

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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EARTH (a play about people)

EARTH-53A couple faced with the possibility of having a child embark on separate journeys through time and space.  A multidisciplinary theatrical event exploring the personal, social and environmental questions surrounding contemporary issues of overpopulation. Created collaboratively and remotely by international teams of artists and scientists based on limitations inspired by the Voyager Golden Record.

EARTH is a cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural and international collaboration. Based on prompts and limitations given by Superhero Clubhouse, teams of artists working remotely (that is, in cities outside NYC) created highly personal scenes, images and dances inspired by themes and questions related to population. The material given to us by Satellite Teams was then developed in dialogue with our artists here in NYC. At this stage of development, we are asking three questions: 1. What is the play, and how does it confront the ecological research? 2. How do we collaborate with artists from afar? 3. How canEARTH be a singular event with consistency of vision, aesthetic and narrative, despite so many “cooks in the kitchen”? By asking these questions, we are also exploring what it means to get along in the world, in the face of global limitations, environmental crises and a population not yet at its peak.

A note from dramaturg Megan McClain

Last year, the Voyager 1 spacecraft entered interstellar space, becoming the farthest human-made object from Earth. On board is the Voyager Golden Record, a disk containing images, music, greetings in 55 languages, and sounds meant to capture the diversity of life on our planet. Created in 1977 by Carl Sagan and a team of collaborators, this time capsule was launched in the hopes that it might be found by intelligent life. Though ambitious, the Voyager Golden Record project was plagued by limitations. How could they hope to represent all of Earth on one record? In creating EARTH (a play about people), we faced a similar challenge. How can we tell a story about human life on this planet of 7.2 billion people? Taking the contents and limitations of the Voyager Golden Record as our inspiration, we have created our own imperfect performance time capsule filled with observations, stories, and experiences devised by a team of 20 local artists and scientists and dozens of artists from other countries including Romania, Australia, China, Japan, Greece, and Denmark. Our play begins with a couple waiting to find out if they are pregnant.  In this temporal limbo, they each embark on separate journeys through time and space. In a world fraught with limited resources and an alarmingly booming human population, what are the environmental, social, and personal implications surrounding the decision to have a child? How do we balance the beauty and brilliance of our species with the impact our very presence has on the world we rely on?

Support EARTH!

From now until September 13, we are operating a fundraising campaign to benefit our fall EARTHworkshop, taking place on Governor’s Island in September as part of a Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Process Space grant and culminating in a public performance on September 20. We have just over a month to raise $5,000– this covers paying stipends to our company of twenty artists, plus other production expenses like design materials, transportation and cookie ingredients. Read more about the campaign and consider making a tax-deductible donation by clicking HERE.

September 20, 2pm – Work-in-progress performance

Building 110 on Governor’s Island

Free and open to the public

The culmination of a Process Space residency from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council 

Team NYC

  • Co-directed by Jeremy Pickard, Harry Poster & Hannah Wolf
  • Made and performed by Nanda Abella, Sergio Botero, Jonathan Camuzeaux, William Cook, Janouke Goosen, Eben Hoffer, Yanghee Lee, Andrew Lindqvist, Bella MacDiarmid, Katey Parker, Jeremy Pickard, Sophia Remolde, Leah Shelton & Sonia Villani 
  • Written by Satellite Artists in collaboration with the NYC company 
  • Dramaturgy by Megan McClain & Anne Zager
  • Original music by Jonathan Camuzeaux 
  • MusicalArrangement by Janouke Goosen
  • Featured choreography by KatieRose McLaughlin
  • Lighting design by Bruce Steinberg
  • Sound design by Sarah Hughes
  • Design dramaturgy Solomon Weisbard
  • Production assistance by John Le

Satellite Teams 

  • Per Bech Jensen (Idom Kirkeby, Denmark)
  • Tommy Dickie & collaborators (Los Angeles, USA)
  • Tina Yotopoulou (Athens, Greece)
  • Christina Pickard (Perth, Australia)
  • Brian O’Neal & collaborators (Minneapolis, USA)
  • Nadia Serantes & collaborators (Santiago, Chile)
  • Toma Danila, Ioana Manciu & Horia Suru (Bucharest, Romania)
  • Byron Yee & Lyrica Yin (Guangzhou, China)

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.” ― Carl Sagan

Originally conceived by Sarah Hughes, Jeremy Pickard and Anne Zager

December 2012: early workshops in NYC
June 2, 2014: work-in-progress showing in NYC
September 20, 2014: work-in-progress showing on Governor’s Island, NYC (as part of a Lower Manhattan Cultural Council “Process Space” grant)
2015: first-draft production, NYC

MORE INFO

Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days 2014: Video highlights

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days were more popular than ever this year, with many companies bringing and swapping items. We were fortunate to have photographer Julien Pearly capturing the two-day event. His video (below) shows the amount of traffic in and out of Fringe Central.

More information and images to follow regarding our data collection from the 2014 Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days.

Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days from Creative Carbon Scotland on Vimeo


Image and video by Julien Pearly.

The post Fringe Reuse and Recycle Days 2014: Video highlights appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenFests Tips: Top green films at the Take One Action Film Festival

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Take One Action is a Scottish-based organisation dedicated to promoting social and environmental justice through film. The organisation is hosting an upcoming film festival in its eighth year of running, and borrows the theme “Another World is Possible” from the World Social Forum. The entire programme is rich in film and discussion events ranging from family-friendly animated tales to chillingly accurate documentaries of environmental plight.

Here are our top five green-tinged film recommendations from the festival’s programme-

Bidder 70 (with short films Feel Like a Mountain and For the Love of…)

“In response to huge areas of public land being sold off for oil and gas leases in Utah, nascent activist Tim DeChristopher disrupted the auctions by successfully bidding $1.7 million he didn’t have for thousands of acres he wanted to preserve. Arrested and threatened with prison, he defies the courts to inspire others to take action for better environmental policies, arguing that civil disobedience is one of our most powerful tools in the fight against climate change.

As hopeful and defiant as its protagonist, Bidder 70 is a powerful portrait of a man coming to grips with the destruction we have wrought on the planet and deciding to keep up the fight.”

Big Men

“Brad Pitt exec produces this extraordinary expose of the hope, scepticism and corruption that threaten to exacerbate Africa’s resource curse and leave its ordinary citizens behind.

In Ghana, a small American energy company fights to hold onto its discovery of oil just as a new government comes into power. Meanwhile, in Nigeria, an established industry continues to take its toll from the people. Amid political uncertainty, power-plays are made, reputations gambled, and pipelines attacked by militants.

With unprecedented access and an unflinching eye Big Men shows the global and all-too-human drama behind the fuel that we continue to take for granted.”

Millions Can Walk (with short film This is Water)

“Can one fight for one’s fundamental rights without resorting to violence? In 2012, hundreds of thousands of Adivasis, India’s aborigines, embarked upon a country-wide march spanning hundreds of kilometres to demand a life of dignity.

Adivasis have borne the brunt of India’s destructive agricultural policies and large-scale infrastructure projects, as land grabs and environmental destruction have robbed them of their homes and traditional existence. Millions Can Walk provides insight into their lives and, in bearing witness to the philosophy of non-violent resistance at the heart of this epic march, offers an inspiring tribute to their perseverance.”

Once upon a Forest (with short films Earthbook and Feel Like A Mountain)

“This magical pilgrimage from the director of March of the Penguins transports you body and soul into rainforest canopies in the Amazon and Africa to celebrate some of the untold wonders of trees.

In a tropical forest 200 feet above the ground, botanist Francis Hallé makes intricate drawings of all he surveys. His images then come alive in Oscar®-winning director Luc Jacquet’s sensory spectacular, using innovative, soaring cinematography techniques to illustrate how trees communicate, co-operate and fight for their lives. Drawing on vast research and knowledge, Jacquet and Hallé lead viewers on a journey into the depths of the tropical jungle.”

Seeds of Time (with short films After My Garden Grows and Sausage)

“Around 10,000 years ago, human populations embraced agriculture, embarking on a path of fundamental social and environmental transformation. 10 millennia later, food security across the globe is threatened by diminishing crop diversity, new diseases and the effects of climate change. Can we future-proof global food production?

Crop diversity pioneer Cary Folwer believes we can – if we act now. Battling natural disasters and international bureaucracy, he has set out on a race to protect the one resource we can’t do without: our seeds. Seeds of time follows Fowler on his impassioned journey to re-invent a global food system that can “live forever”.”

Watermark (with short films Vezo and Thank You Toilet)

“Tumultuous, lush, unfamiliar and epic – multi-award winning director Jennifer Baichwal (Manufactured Landscapes) returns with this mesmerizing symphony on humankind’s relationship with water, reflected through the vision of internationally acclaimed photo artist Edward Burtynsky.

Shot in stunning ultra-HD, The Watermark plunges you into the turbulent interconnections between our seas and watercourses and neo-industrial human endeavor. We visit vast floating farms and the biggest arch dam in the world, the leather tanneries of Dhaka, the US Surf Open, and the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, where thirty million people gather for a sacred bath in the Ganges.”


The Take One Action Film Festival full programme can be viewed here. For more information, please visit the Take One Action website. Image and film descriptions courtesy Take One Action.

The post #GreenFests Tips: Top green films at the Take One Action Film Festival appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Content of Nothing :: Part 6 :: On Hope

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Featured Image: Judy Spark: Untitled, digital print (500 x 309mm approximately) 2010

[In the previous post, Samantha Clark had been talking about the ethical import of wonder in the work of Ronald Hepburn, Suzi Gablick and Jane Bennett.]

Judy Spark: I want to believe in this link between wonder and ‘ethical generosity’ and even love and that there may only be a ‘short step’ from here to ‘humility’ but I feel compelled to take up the cynic’s position again. I’m not convinced. It’s not that I think that this is not possible exactly, but rather that it will be a long road. The human capacity for wonder is one that is shared by the artist, philosopher and scientist alike, indeed all of us have this latent disposition whether or not it is ever developed. But if it was going to lead naturally to an ethical relationship to the wider world, then I think that it would have done so by now. Sometimes it has pre-empted great scientific discovery, but equally, it can lead us to dismantle and separate things in an effort to learn how they work. It does not necessarily, for instance, always lead to an appreciation of the interconnected dependency of things. I feel inspired by Hepburn and Gablick, though I’m not so familiar with Bennett, but I don’t think that they back up their claims with anything concrete, how could they? How exactly does one move from a position of wonder to one of love and ethical awareness? But if this progression is at the moment unclear, perhaps this is ok. I think that the reason I make art and write is in order to encourage this tuning to wonder and the hopes for its potential, that maybe at some point, the pathway between these things will become clearer.

Samantha Clark: Yes, I think you are right to be cynical. Wonder linked to ignorance is a dangerous combination. People flock to see the orcas performing at Seaworld, and experience genuine wonder at the power and beauty of these creatures and their willingness to engage with humans, but they are ignorant of the suffering that this captivity causes the very creatures they admire so much. People wonder at the bare landscape of the Highlands with no idea that they are looking at an ecological disaster area, a man-made wet desert. A little bit of ‘dismantling to see how it works’ doesn’t need to dispel wonder, but can actually create a more educated awareness. Wonder doesn’t depend on a state of naivety. Kant, in his Critique of Judgement, noticed a difference between astonishment (Verwunderung) which fades once the novelty wears off, and a steady, contemplative wonderment (Bewunderung) which does not depend on novelty, and may even grow deeper with familiarity and understanding. The contemplative wonderment he described maintains the questioning and questing aspect of wonder, and yet rests attentively in the wonderful object (Kant, 1997: 273).

A recent document put together by the organisation Common Cause seems to propose some means by which this transition from ‘wonder’ to ethical and environmental awareness might be made. Their focus is on addressing the values we hold in order to create a shift to a more socially and environmentally just society, suggesting that the arts’ ‘capacity to trigger reflection, generate empathy, create dialogue and foster new ideas and relationships offers a powerful and democratic way of expressing, sharing and shaping values.’ (Common Cause, 2013: 4). In the core paper of this document, the psychologist Tim Kasser suggests that our values can be described as either broadly extrinsic, such as financial success, image, popularity (which depend on rewards or other’s opinions and promote competitive and selfish behaviour), or intrinsic, such as self-acceptance, community, affiliation (which promote more empathic and co-operative ways of behaving). He argues that we all have all of these values in us, but that they increase in importance to us the more they are stimulated, and that, broadly speaking, consumer societies emphasise and so promote the development of extrinsic values. These are shown to make us more dependent on external sources of happiness, such as status, entertainment and consumerism. This has far reaching effects. ‘People who prioritise extrinsic values have been shown to care less about the environment and other species, whereas a focus on intrinsic values promotes more ecologically sustainable attitudes and behaviours’ (11). Kasser builds an argument that pursuit of the arts (either as active participant or viewer) is important as it may deepen public commitment to values that promote environmental and social concern. I think there is some truth to this, though with certain caveats. Engaging with art as a high-end luxury commodity and status symbol clearly stimulates extrinsic values. So we need to be circumspect about what kind of art, and what kind of engagement we are talking about. But it seems pretty clear that it is emotions, not factual arguments, that shape our decisions, and that art can have some role to play here.

Ellie Harrison hits the nail on the head in her contribution to the same publication – arguing that to emphasise ‘art’ and ‘culture’ per se gives them a falsely elevated status and is misleading. ‘What we all need regardless of our occupation, is not arts and culture per se, but simply time and space beyond the realms of the market, where we can each access knowledge, critically reflect and feel empowered to change our lives for the better’ (21). She’s right, but art can be one way of opening up some space and time. I think that wonder, when it crops up in the mundane, maybe hearing migrating geese honking as they go flying over the supermarket car park, momentarily opens up a space of this kind. Engaging with art or writing which invites us to share that experience with the writer or the artist ‘primes’ us to be receptive to it when it crops up in life. I think it helps us to open up a little crack in the midst of the day, a ‘space between,’ a momentary breather from the demands of making our way in a market economy devoted to heedless economic growth. Anything that makes us stop and remember to be grateful, even in a small way, makes a contribution. Gratitude is very subversive in a consumer culture that primes us to be in a constant state of wanting. Kasser again: ‘One set of studies showed that very brief and very subtle reminders of the extrinsic value of money lead people to behave less helpfully and generously moments later’ (9). And another study, ‘that focused particularly on people for whom material possessions and social status were quite important found that thinking for a few minutes about the intrinsic values of affiliation and being broadminded caused these individuals to express stronger care for the environment’ 10). So inviting others to share a moment of wonder or reflection or gratitude through the art we make is maybe part of this drip feed, just tickling those extrinsic values one more time.

You mentioned hope, and hopefulness is a real issue these days, its something I seem to come up against again and again – in the context of ‘eco-art’ especially. Reading Rebecca Solnit’s ‘Hope in the Dark’ helped me to think about this – that ‘results’ or ‘outcomes’ of creative work are nonlinear and unpredictable, so hanging on to some idea of what you’d like to happen as a result of your creative work is pointless. If you want direct results then direct action is a better bet. As artists we’re working at the level of metaphor, getting in ‘under the bonnet’ of thought as it were – shift the metaphors and you contribute towards shifting thought. But it’s not something didactic, or fact-based. It’s more like lending your own small weight to the other side of the scales, towards tipping things back, rebalancing, in a Taoist kind of way. And if Kasser is right, and even such a subtle cue can unconsciously affect someone’s values and behaviour, then perhaps that’s cause for hope.

References:

Kant, I. (trans. Pluhar, W) (1997) Critique of Judgement, Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing

Common Cause and Mission Models Money (2103),  The Art of Life: Understanding How Participation in Arts and Culture Can Affect Our Values  http://valuesandframes.org  [Online:  Accessed 12-11- 2013]

Solnit, R (2005) Hope in the Dark: The Untold History of People Power, Edinburgh: Canongate

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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E-Waste Recycling Drive – September 17!

This post comes to you from the Broadway Green Alliance

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The Broadway Green Alliance was founded in 2008 in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council. The Broadway Green Alliance (BGA) is an ad hoc committee of The Broadway League and a fiscal program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Along with Julie’s Bicycle in the UK, the BGA is a founding member of the International Green Theatre Alliance. The BGA has reached tens of thousands of fans through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other media.

At the BGA, we recognize that it is impossible to be 100% “green” while continuing activity and – as there is no litmus test for green activity – we ask instead that our members commit to being greener and doing better each day. As climate change does not result from one large negative action, but rather from the cumulative effect of billions of small actions, progress comes from millions of us doing a bit better each day. To become a member of the Broadway Green Alliance we ask only that you commit to becoming greener, that you name a point person to be our liaison, and that you will tell us about your green-er journey.

The BGA is co-chaired by Susan Sampliner, Company Manager of the Broadway company of WICKED, and Charlie Deull, Executive Vice President at Clark Transfer<. Rebekah Sale is the BGA’s full-time Coordinator.

Go to the Broadway Green Alliance

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Opportunity: Freelance Carbon Reduction Advisers

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Freelance Carbon Reduction Advisers

Creative Carbon Scotland is seeking top quality people to advise arts and cultural organisations and individuals working in the sector on carbon management and reduction in one-to-one sessions in person, over the phone and by email.

We help the cultural sector to reduce its environmental impact and a large part of our work is helping people and organisations measure, report and reduce their carbon emissions from energy use, water use, travel and waste production/recycling.

Job Description

The Freelance Carbon Reduction Advisers will provide one-to-one support to arts organisations and individuals introduced by CCS. The two aims of the work will be:

  • To prepare and train the clients to be able to report their carbon emissions related to travel, energy use, water use and waste disposal (as appropriate) to Creative Scotland for the financial year 2015/16. Some clients may want to report emissions relating to an earlier year.
  • To help clients develop and implement a carbon reduction plan to start to reduce their carbon emissions alongside any reporting

Creative Carbon Scotland has developed a reporting methodology and has licensed tools for these purposes and Advisers and their clients would be encouraged to make use of them. An introduction to and training in our materials and approach will be provided before the Advisers meet clients.

The Advisers will be engaged to work on a self-employed, freelance basis, either with a certain number of days’ work committed to on either side between October 2014 and March 2015, or by being included on a list of advisers who we could call upon when required, with the option of refusing the work when offered. The daily rate would be between £150 and £200, plus approved expenses, depending on the number of days of guaranteed work.

We anticipate there will be a significant need for Advisers in the Central Belt, particularly in Glasgow and the West, with some work in the Tayside, Dumfries and Galloway and Highland regions. We would prefer to work with Advisers resident in these areas to reduce unnecessary travel.

Person Specification

  • Excellent knowledge of carbon management and reduction
  • Experience of advising on carbon reduction in one to one and other situations
  • Ability to engage with people and work with them to achieve their and Creative Carbon Scotland’s aims
  • Excellent written and spoken communication skills
  • Excellent numeracy and facility with spreadsheets and similar tools
  • Awareness of the challenges relevant to SMEs in reducing carbon emissions

Understanding of the built environment and/or the cultural sector would be an advantage

Applications

Please apply by 5pm on Monday 22 September by sending an email with a CV and covering letter to Fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com, making sure that you indicate clearly how you meet the person specification above. We will respond to all applications received by that time.

Equal opportunities and environmental policies

Creative Carbon Scotland aims to be an equal opportunities employer and we will consider all applications equally in line with our policy which is available here. All staff are expected to comply with our Environmental Policy which is available here.

Further information

For more information please visit our website www.creativecarbonscotland.com. If you have any further enquiries, please contact Fiona MacLennan at the address above or call 0131 529 7909.

The post Opportunity: Freelance Carbon Reduction Advisers appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Paper makers – communicating science through art

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

 

Paper making, the production of academic papers, is an increasingly important and interesting part of the work of artists, and in particular artists working with environmental and ecological issues.  This opportunity was recently highlighted by Dave Borthwick on belhalf of Lydia Bach and Kate Foster:

The Paper Makers project, funded by the British Ecological Society, aims to create a dialogue between early career artists and scientists focussing on human impacts on biodiversity, with the overall aim to generate collaborative work for a wider audience.

To do so five pairs of early career artists and scientist will get together to discuss the content of one scientific paper and create five piece of work based on these discussions. The progress and process of the creation of the artwork to a wider audience.

More information can be found at: http://the-paper-makers.blogspot.co.uk/ .

We are looking for artists and scientists to apply to join us by 15th of September.​

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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#GreenFests: Highlights from A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945-2045

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

In charting 1945 to the present day context, and specifically the development of nuclear weaponry, one must consider the events of the past century as one of the most major human forays into irreversible environmental destruction. “A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945-2045” explored whether subsequent Cold War nuclear lessons have really affected our outlook, and if we can learn to live within our worldwide limit.

With a background in the biological and environmental sciences, but a later career in international security, Rogers was able to blend environmental and social sustainability concerns in a global warfare context. He propositioned that climatic change and the marginalisation of certain groups is the new form of insecurity that must be addressed by governments and agencies that might previously have focused on traditional weaponry as a primary fear.

The talk, chaired by Dr Andrea Birdsall from the University of Edinburgh and hosted at The Hub, also managed to explore and provide proof of how international cooperation had mitigated environmental threats in the past. The audience was reminded of the confirmed erosive impact of CFCs to the Ozone layer, and the successful international agreements that led to the global eradication of CFC production and the continuing recovery of the ozone hole in the Antarctic.

Rogers also drew from personal experience to demonstrate his first-hand experiences of climate change and his motivations for pursuing the topic. Although whilst joking that it would be all the audience members took from the talk, he evidenced his personal experience growing grapes and producing wine in England, enabled by obvious climatic changes that have taken place within his lifespan.

The 45-minute talk was also followed by 25 minutes of unexhausted questions from the varied audience. However, the breadth of audience query itself reflected the huge amount of material encapsulated within the topic, with further depth requested on food security, population pressure, the impact of religion and personal culpability. At several points, Rogers even suggested that whole evenings could be dedicated to discussing such topics in the context of security – demonstrating that the framing of sustainability dilemmas as ‘threats’ might provide more urgent engagement and ultimately solutions.


“A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945-2045″ was a one-off discussion event that took place on 27 August 2014. The event was part of the 2014 Edinburgh International Festival programme.

Image: Hiroshima 1945, courtesy Maarten Heerlien/Flickr.

The post #GreenFests: Highlights from A Century on the Edge: From Cold War to Hot World, 1945-2045 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

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