Miranda Wright

Can art help us viscerally understand climate change?

Lars Jan’s HOLOSCENES is an epic public art and performance installation that is a visual, visceral response to climate change. Presented in public space, the centerpiece of HOLOSCENES is a large aquarium that floods, drains, and floods again by way of a hydraulic system that moves 12 tons of water in a minute. The aquarium is inhabited by a performer conducting one of many everyday behaviors sourced from collaborators across the planet.

We can’t wait to see how this project evolves. It is a bold, thoughtful response to an issue we will all undoubtably face- and perhaps currently fear. You can help support this incredible work by visiting the HOLOSCENES Kickstarter.

 

 

CSPA Quarterly: Issue 10

768d3b4ae902374c96e1ab8d40db54e4We see our tenth issue of the CSPA Quarterly, this very issue you have in your hands, as an opportunity to renew, refresh, and even rewind a bit. Since our first issue, the CSPA has grown in reputation; we have travelled the world with special projects, have increased our global membership, and have published well over 2,000 posts online highlighting projects, tools and reports in service of sustainability through art making practices. Our Knowledge Network is expanding quickly, and this Quarterly has been a critical tool in sharing information at conferences, in-person meetings, and with our membership.

This issue contains content from contributors who were part of Issue #1, along with a few new perspectives. We have lovingly called this issue 1.0. As an experiment in looking back, we’ve re-published Sam Goldblatt’s comprehensive report on greening events from 2009, which cites the London 2012 Sustainability Plan. We’ll check in on this plan in a later issue this year. We are also re-running a call to action from Thomas Rhodes in this issue- on renewable energies in organizations. Have we progressed as a movement since these two writings were initially published?

We’ve invited updated articles from frequent contributor Meghan Moe Beitiks, now part of a new “performance research collective” based in Chicago, as well as Olivia Campbell, writing on site-specific dance and it’s relationship to sustainability. Linda Weintraub has contributed a fantastic essay on the curator’s role within our complex arts ecosystem.

And, of course, we feature Dianna Cohen’s latest works in our issue 1.0. Since our first issue, Dianna’s work has been exhibited in several galleries and museums internationally. She has delivered one of the most memorable TED talks on plastic pollution in our oceans, and continues her work with the Plastic Pollution Coalition.

We thank our collaborators in this issue, and our membership for their ongoing support. The issue is available from MagCloud, both in print (on-demand) and as a digital reader.

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE PRINT OR DIGITAL EDITION

THE FUTURE IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be, curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo, will be on display in the Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery at Trinity University from March 1- April 7, 2012. There will be an opening reception on March 1st from 5-7pm.  A gallery talk with the curator and artists will begin at 6pm.

The Future is Not What it Used To Be features works by thirteen artists exploring human incursion on the landscape. Through a variety of media, these artists offer contrasting views of the landscape as touched by human hand through both destruction and conservation.  The exhibition asks, when did nature turn from sustained into sustainable?

The exhibition features artists Ansel Adams; Jeana Baumgardner and Sandy Carson from Austin; Erik Grow and Scot Polach from San Francisco; Caleb Jagger and Todd Jagger from Fort Davis, Texas; Adam Katseff from Stanford, California; Leigh Anne Lester from San Antonio; Allie Mount from Portland, Oregon; Kristin Musgnug from Fayetteville, Arkansas; Adam Waldron-Blain from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and Liz Ward from Castroville, Texas.

Curator Amanda Roscoe Mayo is a graduate of Trinity University where she majored in studio art.  She is now the Co-Director of PLAySPACE Gallery at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, California, where she is a candidate for a Masters in Curatorial Practice. She also co-founded R&R, a curatorial collective based in San Francisco.

Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery

Dicke Art Building, Department of Art and Art History

Trinity University, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX, 78212

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 1-5pm

CSPA Quarterly: On Art & Agriculture

The seventh issue of the CSPA Quarterly is now available!  Cultures around the world rely deeply on both local creativity and agricultural activity. Creative culture and agriculture are inextricably linked, and both are facing challenges as we globalize. This issue contains stories from public projects, visual installations, film, and theater, and examines local vegetable farming, cotton and rice paddy industries, and shrimpboating.

Featured artists include Susannah Mira, Thomas Buttery, Jeremy Pickard, Hui Ling Lee, Eric Leshinsky and Zach Moser.

http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/328247/follow

CSPA Supports: Round TWO

The CSPA congratulates the second recipient of a CSPA Supports MicroGrant:  Elizabeth English and A Collection of Shiny Objects in Brooklyn, NY for their original theater production of Goods & Services (The Walmart Project).

Goods & Services is a collaborative, semi-devised object theater piece that explores Americans’ relationhship with the buying and selling of consumer gods with a focus on the phenomenon of the “Big Box” store.  The project will be developed and presented at the Henson PATCH (Puppetry at the Carriage House) in April 2012.  The project will then move on to New York City early in 2013, with a goal of touring afterwards.

The theme of the project revolves around issues of American consumer culture, the buying and selling and life cycles of objects, and by extension the nature of the community formed by consumers and Walmart employees.  The project reflects three facets of sustainability simultaneously: the environmental impact of consumer culture through theme, the economic impact of the “Big Box” store (and community impact), especially as it manifests in the current climate of economic crisis through story, and new models of sustainable creative space through process.

The recipient of Round Two of CSPA Supports has been selected by a small panel of adjudicators including Ian Garrett, Sarah Peterson, and Miranda Wright, based on the CSPA’s articulated grant guidelines.  We are looking forward to Round Three!

More about A Collection of Shiny Objects here:  http://www.collectshinyobjects.org

 

CSPA Supports

CSPA Supports is a micro-grant program for artists working in any facet of sustainability.  Awards range from $200 to $1,000.  Our next deadline is January 1st, 2012.  Guidelines may be found at https://www.sustainablepractice.org/cspasupports/

PAST RECIPIENTS:

ROUND ONE:

Public Office for Architecture (POA) is a collaborative project situated at MoKS, Center for Arts and Social Practice in Mooste, Estonia.  POA is an artistic practice conceived as a a nomadic architecture office.  POA involves and engages the public with the built environment through architectural and artistic dialogue and intervention.

AGUAZERO Call for Art

Theme:
We are inviting submissions in water-based medium on or with paper.
The competition has an environmental agenda requesting submissions to reference the contrary character of climate change. For example, increased desertification and the escalating effects of weather events such as flooding and soil erosion.
The work should be based on observation, experience and invention. It must be as involved with the process and materials of painting/drawing etc. as with the response to climate change.
We are interested in works that invite close scrutiny and, like environmental events in the world around us, reveal themselves gradually and steadily over time, prompting reaction and renewed contemplation of the ecological challenges the world faces.
Prize:
A two week residency at Cortijada Los Gázquez / Joya: arte + ecologia, Andalucía, Spain including travel costs within Europe (not accommodation while in transit). Winners from outside of Europe can have their travel expenses paid once they are within the EU.
The winner will have sole use of a thirty square meter studio and 20 hectares of land for the period. Accommodation and meals are included as is collection and return to the nearest public transport system. Resident artists will be featured on the Joya: arte + ecología web page, which will include biographical information and images. The work undertaken during the residency will also be documented and entered into our archive.
http://www.losgazquez.com/en/joya/

Open Call: Amplify Action

“Amplify Action: Sustainability through the Arts” will be presented in Spring 2012 by the Skylight Gallery, a department of BSRC’s Center for Arts and Culture. The exhibition is conceived to demonstrate how arts, culture and media are powerful catalysts for social change, and aims to engage neighborhoods in a dialogue about sustainable living, making healthy consumer choices, and taking environmental action. Works in the exhibit will directly and indirectly examine the different components of sustainability such as, but not limited to: ecology, economy, equity, environmental consciousness, resource conservation and efficiency, agriculture, architecture, infrastructure, environmental justice and health.

 

The exhibition “Amplify Action: Sustainability through the Arts,” is a collaborative project of the Pratt Center for Community Development, Pratt Institute’s Initiative for Arts, Community and Social Change (IACSC), and the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation. The project is a part of the Arts Implementation Fund of the Pratt Center, recently established through a generous grant from the Rockefeller Foundation’s NYC Cultural Innovation Fund. The projects of the Arts Implementation Fund, in partnership with community based organizations in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Cypress Hills create projects that support the execution of visual and performance art works created by local artists, artist groups, and artists abroad that promote a civic dialogue about community sustainability.

 

More Information: http://www.amplifyaction.org/p/call-for-artists.html

Online Application: http://www.amplifyaction.org/p/online-application-form.html

Cause for Creativity: Tour da Arts, vol. 3

 SUNDAY, AUGUST 21 / SANTA MONICA, CA

Beat the pump, cycle the town, and enjoy Santa Monica’s sights and sounds. The Santa Monica Museum of Art’s third annual Tour da Arts bike event invites you to participate in a spoke-card workshop and a scenic ride with stops for music, dance, and art along the way. The ride culminates at SMMoA with the Bicycle Bell Ensemble – a tuneful collaborative performance of bicycle bells.
Register Today!Registration is now open. Activities are open to all ages (some restrictions apply). Workshop Admission $5 (free for SMMoA members); Bike tour and festivities FREE. Space is limited.

Stop 1 – ART (Noon – 2 pm)Santa Monica Museum of Art art workshop, exhibitions, and mini-festival 

  • Check-in for the ride. Pre-registration required, REGISTER NOW!
  • Enjoy our cycling culture mini-fest:

Advocacy: Los Angeles Bike Coalition/Santa Monica Spoke, C.I.C.L.E., Tune-up tent by Bikerowave

Excitement: CicLAvia, Tour de Fat, Perry’s Café Bike Tours

Local Design: Bicycle Fixation, Swrve – Urban Cycling Apparel, Shifty – Flirty Bike Fashion

Food trucks: Dosa Truck and Mandoline Grill.

Bicycle Bell Ensemble

 

Stop 2 – DANCE (between 3 – 4 pm) The Broad Stage world music and dance        

  • Arrive at The Broad Stage – Experience a performance by Global Motion, a group dedicated to educating, preserving, and performing world dance. www.thebroadstage.com

 

Stop 3 – MUSIC (between 4 – 6 pm) Santa Monica City Hall presents Jazz on the Lawn with The Electones

 

Stop 4 – COLLABORATIVE PERFORMANCE (7 – 9 pm)Return to SMMoA and perform in the Bicycle Bell Ensemble

  • Complete the ride by participating in a closing collaborative performance with the Bicycle Bell Ensemble led by artist Patrick Miller, Sister Mantos, Télématique, and David Semien.

 

All stops will last about 30 minutes. Full bike route is approximately 7 miles at an easy pace. Snacks and refreshments provided by Whole Foods Santa Monica, Clif Bar, O.N.E. Coconut Water, and IZZE

 


Cause for Creativity: Tour da Arts, vol. 2
 is made possible in part by the City of Santa Monica and the Santa Monica Arts Commission, HBO, and Nordstrom.

CSPA Supports: New Deadline October 1

The deadline for Round Two of CSPA Supports has been extended to October 1.  The CSPA Supports grant program is designed to support the projects of our members as they consider issues of sustainability (ecological, economic, or cultural) in their professional work.  Artists from all genres are encouraged to apply, and international applications are accepted!

Grants range from $200 to $1,000.

For our Guidelines and Application, visit sustainablepractice.org/cspasupports.

Andrew Rogers: Time and Space

Andrew Rogers, a leading contemporary artist based in Australia, is primarily a sculptor.  His large works may be found in plazas and buildings around the world.  He is also the creator of the world’s largest contemporary land art undertaking.

Derived from an early sculpture, the Rhythms of Life project is composed of 47 land art structures, which can be found in 13 countries and on 7 continents.  The project is the result of 13 years of work, and the collaboration of 6,700 people from around the world.

The work is particularly unique in that Rogers has incorporated a great civic vision.  The structures represent a process, and local collaboration.  At many sites, a common Rhythms of Life piece is not far from a work that is local and unique to the community it represents.

For the first time, images of these works are on exhibition at the 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica, California.  68 large scale photographs of Rogers’ Rhythms of Life project will be on display at the gallery until May 28, 2011.  You can also view the work online at www.andrewrogers.com/landart.

Rhythms of Life / Chile

Rhythms of Life / Chile

Rhythms of Life / Antarctica

Rhythms of Life / Antarctica