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The Harrison Studio presents Wilma the Pig – YouTube

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison tell us the story of the original Hog Pasture and why it matters that there is a pig in the MOCA Exhibition Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974.

To understand the relationship of Hog Pasture (1970-71) as #1 of the Survival Pieces to the larger scale works such as The Lagoon Cycle (1974-1984), The Endangered Meadows of Europe (1994) and Peninsula Europe (2000-03) it’s useful to look at the text Harrisons – On the Survival Pieces 1970-72 which was published in the catalogue of the Radical Nature exhibition a couple of years ago,

It shows how a life of making art is a life of learning.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Join Us for Our Upcoming Textile Drive!

This post comes to you from the Broadway Green Alliance

 

The Broadway Green Alliance was founded in 2008 in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council. The Broadway Green Alliance (BGA) is an ad hoc committee of The Broadway League and a fiscal program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Along with Julie’s Bicycle in the UK, the BGA is a founding member of the International Green Theatre Alliance. The BGA has reached tens of thousands of fans through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other media.

At the BGA, we recognize that it is impossible to be 100% “green” while continuing activity and – as there is no litmus test for green activity – we ask instead that our members commit to being greener and doing better each day. As climate change does not result from one large negative action, but rather from the cumulative effect of billions of small actions, progress comes from millions of us doing a bit better each day. To become a member of the Broadway Green Alliance we ask only that you commit to becoming greener, that you name a point person to be our liaison, and that you will tell us about your green-er journey.

The BGA is co-chaired by Susan Sampliner, Company Manager of the Broadway company of WICKED, and Charlie Deull, Executive Vice President at Clark Transfer<. Rebekah Sale is the BGA’s full-time Coordinator.

Go to the Broadway Green Alliance

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Earthrise – Trashing Lebanon (performance)

A threare group aims to use powerful images of everyday garbage, humour and solid facts to examine Lebanese attitudes towards consumption, and prompt them to consider where their trash ends up. Zeina Aboul-Hosn takes a seat in the final performance.

More on the Theatre Communications Group Website here: http://www.tcgcircle.org/2012/08/detrashing-lebanon/

via earthrise – Trashing Lebanon – YouTube.

Taylor Guitars & The Future of Ebony

In this video, Taylor Guitars co-founder Bob Taylor talks about the world’s dwindling supply of ebony, the realities of ebony sourcing in Cameroon, and Taylor’s efforts to preserve a sustainable supply for the entire musical instrument community. With the co-purchase of Crelicam, an ebony mill in Cameroon in 2011, Taylor began to develop a fresh framework for sustainable sourcing, one that blends socially responsible forestry with job training that will help Cameroonian communities support themselves and improve their living standards.

From the Taylor website: “We need to use the ebony that the forest gives us,” emphasizes Bob, who has personally met with a number of other prominent guitar manufacturers since the Crelicam purchase to spread awareness of the new realities regarding ebony sourcing. While the current conditions don’t mean that the days of all-black ebony are entirely gone, they do mean that if we want to ensure a sustainable ebony supply for future generations of instruments and players, we must embrace greater cosmetic diversity.

The story was recently picked up by the Los Angeles Times. In the article, but Ron White, Taylor was also quoted as saying, regarding the workers at the mill:

“We are going to start doing a lot of the processing and that will provide more jobs and more higher-paying jobs and triple the value of what they can sell, instead of just the raw material,” Taylor said. “There is money in the ebony, and they deserve to have more of that.”

Click these links for more info:

Taylor Guitar’s Commitment to Sustainability

Taylor Guitar’s page on Sustainable Ebony

LA Time’s Article about Talyor Guitar’s purchase of the Crelicam Mill

An update and welcome to Culture|Futures 2011

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

A  warm welcome to: Culture|Future partners, cultural institutions and cultural actors from around the world

Culture|Futures’ spiral of engagement in 2011 is expanding…

Welcome to the new website and the strategies for Culture|Futures over the next decades.

Please see the

  • information about the events planned for 2011 on the News Page
  • information on Culture|Futures  strategic Vision

If you are new to Culture|Futures you may be interested in its history since 2007

Please feel free to share this resource site and its information to other Cultural Institutions, Cultural actors and practitioners in your area.

You or your organisation may also wish to join and share information about your cultural activities in this area on the Culture|Futures Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and News links below

__________________________________

Individuals are invited to connect to Culture|Futures through the Culture|Futures ning.community

This site will be re-launched in the near future at www.culturefutures.ning.com

Please also connect with  Culture|Futures social media: you can also sign up  for email updates by entering your email on the homepage

facebook logo link  youtube logo culturefutures link  culturefutures twitter logo link  culturefutures news feed logo

Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.
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Nuclear history, nuclear future

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Artists have been working with the cultural and environmental dimensions of nuclear power for a long time.  Many have also been anti-nuclear activists as well.  The artists want to raise awareness and contribute to the public discussion.

This work isn’t facile or simple, and drawing attention to it is done in a spirit of respect for the people currently working to minimise the impact of the disaster at Fukushima.

Gair Dunlop is launching his film Atom Town with a tour including Inspace at Edinburgh University 27/28 May, Caithness Horizons, Thurso, 3 June and Arts Catalyst, London, 23 June.  There is a short ‘sketch’ on Vimeo:

Dounreay Atomic Research Establishment (official website for decomissioning) is a sprawling monument to solidity, optimism and analogue engineering. The intangible alchemies and sense of romantic science at its heart are trapped like amber in archive film and in its colossal structures. Over the last two years, unprecedented access to the facility and to the UKAEA Archive at Harwell have allowed Gair Dunlop to explore the dream and the consequences of high science in a remote community.

Eve Andree Laramee has successfully secured funding through UnitedStatesArtists.org amongst other sources for her film/video project Slouching Towards Yucca Mountain.  Yucca Mountain in Nevada is a proposed nuclear waste repository.  This work in development is about another aspect of legacy.

Her initial proposal video is on youTube:

She has also posted some initial character sketches on youTube:

But each of these artists has their own personal history with nuclear activism. Sitting with Lorna Waite discussing art and nuclear activism I discovered that the reason she didn’t get to be Civic Week Queen in Kilbirnie when she was 16 was because she asked “What exactly is a safe container for radioactive waste?”  She went on to an action to disrupt a meeting of the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management – she took some sand from Dalgety Bay in a lead-lined container and a home-made Geiger-counter to the meeting.  Dalgety Bay is polluted with radioactive waste because the luminous dials for WWII aircraft have ended up there (download an NHSFife document on the subject).  She then went on to talk about the assassination of Willie Ross, an SNP activist who had been working on legal arguments against Nirex and their plan to do test drilling in the Scottish Highlands in preparation for developing a nuclear repository. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

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Uist Eco Film Festival

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

This collaboration between Sustainable Uist and Taigh Chearsabhagh Arts Centre, Lochmaddy, promises a weekend of challenging and interesting films April 29 – May 1, 2011.  Taigh Chearsabhagh is the excellent gallery, arts centre and cultural hub on the very most western edge of Europe (the outer Hebrides).

Recommendations I received recently include Gasland and Home (other suggestions?).

But programming a film festival? Greenpeace actions off youTube?  Or Wall-E, The Day After Tomorrow, Avatar?  An Inconvenient Truth: is it too tired?.  Looking forward to hearing their choices.

Film, environmental activism, greenwash: discuss.

website: http://www.facebook.com/?sk=lf#!/UistEcoFilmFestival?v=wall.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

C&S with Bill McKibben in Cancún #COP16

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRFgru1E1ng

Friends of the CSPA, Linh Do and Tim Hall interview Bill McKibben on the 28th of November in Cancún, Mexico before COP16, the UN climate change negotiations.

Bill talks about his work at 350.org and as a writer, before discussing the future of the environment movement, the virtues of young people and his expectations of COP16.

via YouTube – C&S with Bill McKibben in Cancún.

ARTPULSE MAGAZINE » Sustainable Art Practices / Producing Art in the 21st Century

An excellent article on ARTPULSE By Christiane Paul

Sustainability has become the new “social networking”-at least it seems to have superseded the latter as the catchword du jour. An increasing number of conferences, think tanks, art exhibitions and publications have been devoted to the subject over the past few years and have reached critical mass. Sustainability has moved from its original, mostly ecological context to a larger cultural one. One might argue that a focus on sustainability is the next logical step after the rise of social networking enabled by the user-generated content of Web 2.0 sites-such as blogs, Wikis, MySpace, YouTube, and Flickr: networking itself is intrinsic to digital technologies, which allow for multiple forms of connectivity, while sustaining networks (of culture, productivity etc.) presents more of a challenge.

READ ONE: ARTPULSE MAGAZINE » Editorials » Sustainable Art Practices / Producing Art in the 21st Century.

Fallen Fruit: SHOW US HOW YOU EAT

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1EVMWpO8VA

Fallen Fruit introduces Show Us How You Eat, a participatory online video project, 2010, and is seeking your videos of eating, up to 60 seconds in length.

Though there are endless images of food in art, and even still images of food in peoples mouths, we realize there is very little documentation of people actually eating. In Show Us How You Eat we solicit participants around the world on YouTube to send us one-minute clips of them eating not preparing, cutting, or cooking, but actually eating, chewing and swallowing food. These clips are combined into an endless stream of smiling mastication, a meditation on the act of eating that connects each and every one of us.

A selection of the videos submitted to Show Us How You Eat will be included in an exhibition, Fallen Fruit Presents The Fruit of LACMA (June 27-November 7, 2010), as part of EATLACMA, a year-long investigation into food, art, culture and politics.

HOW TO ENTER

Contact information: In order for your work to be considered please include your name and e-mail address with your entry.

Deadline: This is an ongoing project, but in order to be considered for inclusion in the Fallen Fruit Presents the Fruits of LACMA exhibition, submit your entry before May 31.

MORE INFO HERE: YouTube – SHOW US HOW YOU EAT.