York Artist

Getting Off the Planet

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

ecoartspace is proud to present the first in a series of site-based residencies happening throughout the state of New Mexico (2012-2013), a unique project curated by ecoartspace founder and west coast curator Patricia Watts and independent curator Jenée Misraje in collaboration with the Santa Fe Art Institute (SFAI), titled Getting Off the Planet.

A digital dome video work with surround sound titled CARBON X created by New York artist Charles Lindsay in collaboration with visual effects specialist Eric Hanson of RezX in Los Angeles, will be presented to the public Saturday, September 22nd at 2pm at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Digital Dome in Santa Fe, New Mexico. An addition viewing will take place on Tuesday at 9am for the annual ISEA conference during their Santa Fe Day.

Lindsay, a multimedia artist, has been refining his camera-less photographic process for over ten years and was invited by the curators to be in residence at the Santa Fe Art Institute in June 2012 to explore how his imagery could be applied in the fully articulated dome at IAIA. Lindsay spent several months in 2011 and 2012 working out of Los Angeles with Hanson rehearsing the 5 min video and while at IAIA this past summer he worked with Ethan Bach the dome director to edit and apply sounds from the region. The content is other worldly you could say, and offers viewers another realm to consider what it means to live in a world where other forms of extraterrestrial intelligence potentially exists. What might they look like, how might their presence be known.

In 2010 Lindsay was selected by the SETI Institute to be the first official artist-in-residence, and has been provided with the opportunity to work with the famous Dr. Jill Tartar at the SETI Radio Telescope in Northern California.

Getting Off the Planet is a concept that Patricia Watts conceived of as an exhibition in 2008. In 2010 she partnered with Jenée Misraje to research artists and identify funding, then decided to focus on residencies instead. Watts has recently made five trips to New Mexico visiting sites and potential collaborators. It is the curators vision that the invited artists will spend at least a month in New Mexico at a site of their choice, to create work either in the landscape, or derive imagery and ideas from their time in New Mexico to create work later at their home studios. The works will speak to our relationship with the universe and how it informs what it means to be here now on planet Earth from an ecological and spiritual perspective.

The curators are seeking funding to commence residencies with Taro Shinoda (Japan), Aleksandra Mir (UK), Vincent Lamouroux (France), and Roman Keller and Christina Hemauer (Switzerland), as well as five other artists out of 15 artists currently under consideration.

Patricia Watts will present the GOTP project at ISEA on Thursday September 20th at 9am at the Natural History Museum Planetarium in Albuquerque, and will moderate a panel discussion including Charles Lindsay, along with other panelists, in the afternoon at 1:15 in the special events room at the Albuquerque Museum.

A completion exhibition will take place Fall 2013 at the Santa Fe Art Institute gallery.

See you in New Mexico!!!

http://www.gettingofftheplanet.org

 

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

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Artist’s Talk by Kimberley Hart at Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC

On Saturday December 12, 2009, New York artist Kimberley Hart gave a talk about her recent exhibition Scout at Mixed Greens in Chelsea. The event was co-sponsored by ecoartspace and NYFA.


The works in Scout contemplate specific themes surrounding self-sufficiency, sustainability, observation, labor, cultivation, exploration, defense and tenacity.


Before mentioning any of the artworks in the show, Kimberley began by explaining that her new body of work came out of major life changes involving food and her interest around issues of agricultural sustainability. In the past few years, in an effort to eat healthy locally grown foods, she decided to give up all convenience foods and made a conscious effort to eat mostly organic foods. Kimberley feels that to a large part – many current environmental problems are due to our culture’s worship of convenience. To confront this dependence, Kimberley gave up packaged foods, ate strictly whole foods and eventually consumed only local and sustainably farmed food. She instituted a “no plastic” rule in her home which began with giving up bottled water and proceeded to take out containers, plastic bags and all plastic packaging.


Kimberley was influenced by reading many current popular books on the food revolution such as Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma which led her towards living a more sustainable life. She started urban homesteading, canning, composting, and cutting garbage down to one small bag a week. She joined a CSA, bought only grass fed, pastured meats and stopped eating out or ordering take-out. She is striving to have as small of a footprint as possible and is giving serious thought to starting a farm on a former cattle ranch in the South. This passion about food, sustainability, farming, and stewardship, led Kimberley to meet various people involved with permaculture and the transition movement, environmentalists and social justice advocates. She feels that as an artist she is coming from a different place but can potentially end up with similar and interrelated solutions.


In order to create this new show, Kimberley spent time contemplating a way to integrate her new outlook on life and focus on sustainability and self-sufficiency into her artwork. She decided to continue utilizing narrative and allegory as in her past bodies of work. Through drawing and sculpture, she exposes her alter ego represented as a mischievous, irreverent young girl who is self-reliant but more vulnerable and suspicious than in years past. Though noticeably absent from the work, this girl was once full of sparkles and glitter. She is no longer fantasizing about her hunting prowess or setting traps for inappropriate prey. Instead, we find her hunkered down in an austere outpost with few essentials and a concern for an unknown adversary. There are vestiges of a carefree girlhood, but the tenor has changed—a sense of uncertainty has eroded her daring as she struggles to maintain some bravery in the face of a new, foreboding reality.


The works in the exhibition reveal her alter ego’s surroundings, shelter and possessions. A “bank” holds prized, as well as scavenged, provisions and doubles as a repository for a personal currency and objects to barter in this new world. Beautifully crafted, ominous vultures skulk and spread their wings near a pivotal piece titled, The Death of Sparkle. While Kimberley’s alter ego has proven to be equally prissy and cunning in past exhibitions, she is now overwhelmed by apprehensions and threatened by the malicious marauder responsible for Sparkle’s death.

Fantasy and fine craftsmanship remain hallmarks of her work, but the tone has shifted to reflect a change—both imagined and real—in her environment. There is a marked shift in her alter ego from mischief-maker of the vernal woodlands to a menaced and solitary defender in a dystopic landscape.


“In an allegory of our shared hopes and fears, an itinerant, young heroine and an elusive, predatory force struggle for prominence. Survival for these characters is symbiotic; their lives intertwine in a closed loop of cause and effect where the lonely girl, in the face of a malicious entity and in a degrading environment, maintains an acute sense of optimism through her own perseverance. This dystopian fantasy explores an uncertain future, an existence outside of modern convenience where subsistence is the primary concern. Referencing issues ranging from institutional critique, environmental stewardship, egalitarianism and our shared literary and visual culture, this work of speculative fiction offers a potential outcome to our current socioeconomic crisis.

We are all scouts now.” Kimberley Hart, 2009


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