Video Work

Shifting Baselines: The NEW NORMAL

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

A Report from the residency and exhibition titled Shifting Baselines including artists’ Cynthia Hooper and Hugh Pocockat the Santa Fe Art Institute in New Mexico, curated by ecoartspace founder Patricia Watts. Opens January 7th, 2013.

Shifting Baselines is my third show in the last year focused on water issues, and Cynthia Hooper has been in all of them. Actually, I also curated her video work in a show in 2010 titled EcoArchive in San Francisco. Needless to say, I think she is brilliant and is very informed about highly complicated political and economic issues around water distribution.

Hooper captures human interventions with video, mostly agricultural, in the landscape with an epic style of a romantic landscape painter. Although her landscapes are very luscious, they are also filled with montage of disruptions that can ironically be seenas poetic. And, she is also an talented painter who depicts very small realistic scenes that she paints with printed text on large sheets of watercolor paper to both inform her viewers visually and intellectually with her writings of the many layers of politics involved in water management.

I first met Hugh Pocock in 2004 at the Santa Monica Museum of Art where he created a salt evaporation garden in their project room that appeared like a laboratory setting for a scientist. It was the first installation I had seen at a museum that appearedaesthetically intriguing, as well as interactive, and educational.

Pocock works with materials such as water, dirt, wind, air in his performative installations. For Shifting Baselines he decided to build on similar installations he has done in the past that address where water comes from and how it relates to ourselves, our bodies, including a work he performed for the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore in 2009 titled myfoodmypoop.

Since his arrival in New Mexico, Pocock has been collecting buckets of snow from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains outside of Santa Fe, which he then filters after it melts to make bottles of drinking water available for participants in the exhibition space. –>

The great thing about this project is that as a curator it is the first time that I have been invited to be in residence along with the artists as they create their work in the gallery before the exhibition opens.

To learn more about the Shifting Baselines residency and exhibition, please go to the Santa Fe Art Institute blog HERE.

Cynthia Hooper

Hugh Pocock

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Getting Off the Planet

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

ecoartspace is proud to present the first in a series of site-based residencies happening throughout the state of New Mexico (2012-2013), a unique project curated by ecoartspace founder and west coast curator Patricia Watts and independent curator Jenée Misraje in collaboration with the Santa Fe Art Institute (SFAI), titled Getting Off the Planet.

A digital dome video work with surround sound titled CARBON X created by New York artist Charles Lindsay in collaboration with visual effects specialist Eric Hanson of RezX in Los Angeles, will be presented to the public Saturday, September 22nd at 2pm at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Digital Dome in Santa Fe, New Mexico. An addition viewing will take place on Tuesday at 9am for the annual ISEA conference during their Santa Fe Day.

Lindsay, a multimedia artist, has been refining his camera-less photographic process for over ten years and was invited by the curators to be in residence at the Santa Fe Art Institute in June 2012 to explore how his imagery could be applied in the fully articulated dome at IAIA. Lindsay spent several months in 2011 and 2012 working out of Los Angeles with Hanson rehearsing the 5 min video and while at IAIA this past summer he worked with Ethan Bach the dome director to edit and apply sounds from the region. The content is other worldly you could say, and offers viewers another realm to consider what it means to live in a world where other forms of extraterrestrial intelligence potentially exists. What might they look like, how might their presence be known.

In 2010 Lindsay was selected by the SETI Institute to be the first official artist-in-residence, and has been provided with the opportunity to work with the famous Dr. Jill Tartar at the SETI Radio Telescope in Northern California.

Getting Off the Planet is a concept that Patricia Watts conceived of as an exhibition in 2008. In 2010 she partnered with Jenée Misraje to research artists and identify funding, then decided to focus on residencies instead. Watts has recently made five trips to New Mexico visiting sites and potential collaborators. It is the curators vision that the invited artists will spend at least a month in New Mexico at a site of their choice, to create work either in the landscape, or derive imagery and ideas from their time in New Mexico to create work later at their home studios. The works will speak to our relationship with the universe and how it informs what it means to be here now on planet Earth from an ecological and spiritual perspective.

The curators are seeking funding to commence residencies with Taro Shinoda (Japan), Aleksandra Mir (UK), Vincent Lamouroux (France), and Roman Keller and Christina Hemauer (Switzerland), as well as five other artists out of 15 artists currently under consideration.

Patricia Watts will present the GOTP project at ISEA on Thursday September 20th at 9am at the Natural History Museum Planetarium in Albuquerque, and will moderate a panel discussion including Charles Lindsay, along with other panelists, in the afternoon at 1:15 in the special events room at the Albuquerque Museum.

A completion exhibition will take place Fall 2013 at the Santa Fe Art Institute gallery.

See you in New Mexico!!!

http://www.gettingofftheplanet.org

 

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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ISEA 2011 Istanbul, Turkey

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

This post is long over due by a couple months! To summarize, ecoartspace was invited to speak at the International Society of Electronic Arts or ISEA 2011 symposium in Istanbul in September on a panel called Public Art in the Sustainable City by Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry from Dubai who also recently invited us to be jurors on the upcoming Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Freshkills Park (the former Fresh Kills landfill) in Staten Island. Other panelists included Glen Lowry who presented a project he is working on with a large team of architects and artists linking Dubai and Vancouver; and Nacho Zamora from Spain gave a talk about Solar Artworks. ecoartspace presented examples of sustainable public art projects in North America including references for developing public art master plans that focus on ecological systems, much of what was posted HERE on the ecoartspace blog back in May 2011. It was a very productive trip and was made possible through supporters who donated money for artworks via IndieGoGo (Take Me To Constantinople). Patricia Watts kept a personal blog of her journey which you can read HERE.

We also had the opportunity to meet two Turkish artists suggested to us that are doing video work addressing environmental issues, Ethem Özgüven and Genco Gülan. Özgüven has directed short films, videoart and documentaries since 1986 and currently teaches students at Istanbul’s Bilgi University how to harness media for environmental education.

Synopsis: Shopping Water is a fairy tale prophesizing capitalisms deliterious effects on global warming. Woman (Katherine Müller) finds herself in an ancient sunken city (Myndos) while shopping for bottled water. The installation points out that, if we continue along our current path of comsumption, we might all need to learn to live underwater.

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

Interspecies – artists collaborating with animals

2-4 October 2009, open 11am-7pm admission and all events free

An exhibition, live event, symposia and family day at

A Foundation London
Rochelle School
Arnold Circus, London, E2 7ES

www.artscatalyst.org for details and booking
This event was also in Manchester in March, see more about that by clicking here.

How do humans and animals relate to each other? In The Arts Catalysts’ Interspecies exhibition and event, seven international artists have created a range of work that explores this complex relationship. From live experiments that allow visitors to communicate with fish to a video work that explores the age-old affiliation between falconer and falcon, Interspecies brings together a number of artists working with animals and explores the boundaries of our interaction. Curious about the animal’s point of view, the artists challenge the dominant human viewpoint and aim to work in collaboration with other species.

The family day on Sunday 4 October will give families a chance to see artists in contact with real animals – like performance artist Kira O’Reilly who will be Falling asleep with a pig, called Deliah, and Antony Hall whose Enki Experiment 4 invites visitors to communicate with an electric fish.  During the afternoon, parents and children can take part in a series of free events.

Interspecies is organised by The Arts Catalyst in partnership with A Foundation.

The Arts Catalyst commissions artists and curates exhibitions which explore contested issues in science and society www.artscatalyst.org

Events

Friday 2 October

6pm, Exhibition tour with curator Rob La Frenais

7–9pm, Symposium: Non-Human Primates with Patrick Munck, collaborator with Nicolas Primat, Rachel Mayeri and Sarah Jane Vick, primatologist. Limited spaces, please book online.

Saturday 3 October

1-3pm and 3.30-5.30pm, Primate Cinema: How To Act Like An Animal. Two workshops with Rachel Mayeri for over 16s exploring the social dynamics of non-human primates through performance.  Limited spaces, please book online.

2pm, Tour of ENKI experiment 4 with Antony Hall

3–6pm, Symposium: Animals, Humans and Power (BSL interpreted) with Antennae editor Giovanni Aloi, Photographer Karen Knorr, Helen Macdonald, writer of Falcon, Ruth Maclennan and Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson. Limited spaces, please book online.

6pm, How to Act Like An Animal performance

Family Day – Sunday 4 October

2–4pm Becoming Bowerbirds. These intriguing birds show unusual creativity – they construct bowers which they decorate with found objects to attract females. Children and parents are invited to be a Bowerbird for the afternoon with artist Sally Hampson.  Advanced booking advisable at www.artscatalyst.org (Children 5yrs or under need to be accompanied)

2pm, 3pm and 4pm, Interspecies Tales by poet and storyteller Shamim Azad.  Shamim’s work uses aspects of the Asian folk and oral traditions, enlivening traditional stories with chant and body movement, poems, percussion instruments, tabla and songs.

4.30pm, Animal Handler’s Tales, broadcaster and trainer of the owls used in the first Harry Potter movie, James Mackay talks about his work as ‘The Animal Man’ with exhibition curator Rob La Frenais.

Admission free to all events. Accompanied children and families welcome. Unfortunately, dogs cannot be permitted.

Physical access to some parts of the exhibition and events is limited; please contact admin@artscatalyst.org for further information

For images and more details, please contact Jo Fells, 07977 226187, jo.fells@artscatalyst.org

Strange beasts in Shrewsbury

Theo Jansen is unveiling one of  his new wind-driven creatures at Shrewsbury’s Shift-Time: A Festival of Ideas this July. This gives us an excuse to show this piece of much-loved video of his “strandbeests”:

 

STRANDBEESTEN_TRAILER from Alexander Schlichter on Vimeo.

Shift-time is taking its inspiration from the Darwin celebrations this year. It also features a new sound/video work Follow The Voice by the great Marcus Coates:

In a playful echo of Darwin’s The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals, Marcus Coates’ new film work, Follow the Voice establishes striking parallels between a range of familiar man-made sounds and an equally evocative chorus of animal cries and calls. Chasing pockets of sound around the urban landscape of Shrewsbury, (the ‘beep’ of the supermarket checkout; the siren of a reversing delivery lorry) and by slowing down or speeding up his recordings, Coates reveals an extraordinary likenesses with the natural calls of animal species. Follow the Voice captures the heightened feeling of interconnectedness at the heart of Darwin’s view of the world, and reminds us of the spirit of curiosity and discovery that infuses his ideas.

Follow The Voice premieres on July 11 and is installed in the Unitarian Church where Darwin worshipped as a child.

More on Shift-Time here.

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology