Tipping Point

Tipping Point event London

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Representing Uncertainty

Who: Academics at KCL and artists from the wider community

When: Tuesday 2 July 2013, 5:00-9:00 pm

Where: Pyramid Room, Strand Campus, King’s College London

TippingPoint_logo2

TippingPoint, in partnership with the King’s Cultural Institute, is going to be holding a series of workshops that brings together academics from King’s College London with artists and other interested parties in the wider community. The aim is to explore particular subjects in depth, subjects which are of particular interest to the academics concerned, the artistic community, the broader public, and which also have a bearing on climate change.

We are delighted to announce that the first of these “Representing Uncertainty” will take place on Tuesday, 2 July 2013 from 5.00 to 9.00 PM, in the Pyramid Room (K4U.04, King’s Building, 4th Floor) at the Strand campus of King’s College London (see Building ‘A’ in the bottom map here).

Bruce D. Malamud, Professor of Natural and Environmental Hazards in the Department of Geography, will be presenting his perspective on the subject of how uncertainty can be represented, to be echoed by a presentation by an artist. The idea is to bring together scientific, artistic and other views on uncertainty in the world around us, so that different viewpoints might learn from each other.

This will be a working session, with plenty of opportunity for discussion in groups. It will also be very open-ended; if possible, Bruce is keen to pursue some form of scientific-artistic collaboration, and the possibility will certainly exist of applying for funding to support this under the KCI’s Creative Futures Programme.

This will certainly be an evening to attend if you are interested in the subject from an artistic perspective. Please let Yvonne Castle (yvonne.castle@kcl.ac.uk) know if you would like to attend. Drinks and nibbles will be served!

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Trybooking | Greening Our Performance – Production

Join us for the fourth workshop in the 2012 Greening Our Performance series as we tackle sustainable production. How do we incorporate sustainability into production? Is it possible to assess our carbon footprint and what is Green Design?

Facilitated by Angharad Wynne-Jones (Tipping Point Australia and Artshouse), this sessions will involve a number of practical presentations and panel discussions by some of the industry’s leading sustainable practitioners.

Afternoon tea will be provided and we invite you to join us for post event drinks at the Curve Bar afterwards.

DATE:  Friday 7th September.
TIME:  1pm to 5pm
VENUE: ANZ Pavillion, Arts Centre Melbourne, VIC.
CONTACT DETAILS: Angela Pamic. angelapamic@gmail.com

via Trybooking | Greening Our Performance – Production.

Keep up with Greening Our Performance on Facebook

TippingPoint Newcastle

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Image from Tipping Point web site

Tipping Point have announced their next gathering and have an open application procedure for some places for artists and academics.

“TippingPoint, in partnership with Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability (NIReS), will be holding a major national gathering of those concerned with the interface between the arts and culture on one hand, and environmental issues, particularly climate change, on the other.

Our aim is to continue and strengthen the vital process of giving the urgent challenges of climate change and sustainability a cultural and artistic voice.  This will be a rare opportunity to step outside day-to-day work and engage with innovative peers from across many disciplines, using presentations, panel discussions, group exercises and creative projects.  Our ultimate aim is to help stimulate radical and imaginative thinking in wider society, as we all attempt to comprehend, mitigate and prepare for our inevitably changing environment.”

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

My Last Car – final showings

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

My Last Car, commissioned by Tipping Point, I Move, and the Warwick Arts Centre, has its final performances today through Saturday at the Warwick Arts Centre.  Everyone remembers their first car; what if their present car were their last car?  The show looks at the influences the motor car has had on people’s lives, and issues of sustainability.

The star is a soft-top Rover 216 broken down to its component parts.  My Last Car is both a gallery installation and a performance.  Information and tickets here.

My Last Car – Alan Dix, the man behind the wheel from imove on Vimeo.

 

“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.
The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

ashdenizen: four podcasts on culture and climate change now online

A new series of four podcasts on Culture and Climate Change is now online at iTunes U. The discussions bring together artists, writers, film-makers, scientists, academics and journalists with a comedian, a choreographer, a campaigner, and an entrepreneur.

The Mediating Change series is hosted by Quentin Cooper and contributors include Tim Smit, Marcus Brigstocke, Siobhan Davies (see pic), Roger Harrabin, Joe Smith and two of the Ashden Directory’s editors, Wallace Heim and Robert Butler. More details here.

The producer, Vicky Long, says:

Cultural activity in this area is gathering real momentum, with ‘Greenland’ opening at the National Theatre and ‘The Heretic’ opening at the Royal Court early next year. We feel it’s vital a critical framework is developed alongside this emerging work.

This series represents a first sustained exploration of culture and climate change in a publicly-available broadcast-quality format.

See also: Tipping Point launches first of four discussions
Tim Smit and Marcus Brigstocke join debate on popular culture and climate change

via ashdenizen: four podcasts on culture and climate change now online.

Tipping Point Announces Second Round of Commissions

From the Tipping Point Website:

We are pleased to announce that our second round of commissions is now launched.

This year we are delighted to be able to offer a co-commission with Without Walls, the consortium of 8 of the UK’s most strategically significant outdoor arts festivals.

We will be able to sponsor around 6 commissions and will offer awards as follows.

  • One award of up to £30k (this will be a co-commission between TippingPoint and Without Walls and should meet specific criteria)
  • One award of up to £25k (TippingPoint Commission)
  • Two awards of up to £15k (TippingPoint Commission)
  • One award of up to £10k (TippingPoint Commission)
  • Two awards of up to £5k (TippingPoint Commission)

Proposals must be submitted by Monday 6th December at 5pm. For further guidance and a full application form please download the following document: TP Commissions Round 2 How to apply.doc

ashdenizen: tipping point launches first of four discussions

At this weekend’s Tipping Point conference, there’ll be a panel discussion on the first morning at the Examination Schools, Oxford (pic), which will examine ‘A History of Cultural Responses to Climate Change’.

The discussion is chaired by Quentin Cooper (presenter of Radio 4’sMaterial World) and the panel includes Diana LivermanNigel Clark,Siobhan Davies and Wallace Heim, the Ashden Directory co-editor, and guest blogger here.

This is the first of four discussions on culture and climate change, organised by Joe Smith and myself. The discussions will be recorded and made available on the Open University iTunesU.

This blog will be reporting on the panel discussion and, more widely, on the two days of the Tipping Point conference.

via ashdenizen: tipping point launches first of four discussions.

ashdenizen: is climate change a zombie concept?

Kellie Payne reports on the Tipping Point event, held earlier this month, where Mike Hulme suggested climate change was a zombie concept:

as a metaphor it has done its work. As a concept, it connects a large swathe of issues combined through the scientific narrative and perhaps there are other ways to make progress.

Much less the as-billed scientific update, the Tipping Point event held on Wednesday 13th April at Kings College, London was a philosophical exploration of the status of our current conceptualisation of climate change.

Hosted by Tipping Point, the arts organisation that seeks to build bridges between artists and climate scientists, the afternoon featured Mike Hulme, UEA climate scientist and author of Why We Disagree About Climate Change, climate change adaptation specialist Emma Tompkins and Greenpeace’s Senior Climate Advisor Charlie Kronick . In attendance were past Tipping Point conference attendees, a mix of artists, academics and a few scientists.

Hulme is a veteran climate scientist whose career has included serving as the founder-director of the Tyndall centre and contributing scientist to UK climate change scenarios and reports for the IPCC. However, writing his recent book led Hulme to take a more philosophical perspective: his interest being more in the positioning of our larger conceptualisations of climate change and interrogating different epistemological constructions of climate change. Moving beyond the merely scientific understanding of climate change, he investigates how climate change is understood in disciplines varying from economics, ethics, politics and humanities. In particular, he argues that climate change is a value laden concept that reflects our views of the world, nature, the economy and ethical frameworks.

Hulme’s presentation was largely an explanation of the four myths he explores in his book: lamenting Eden which draws on a sense of nostalgia, presaging apocalypse based on a sense of fear, constructing Babel (hubris) and celebrating jubilee which builds upon our sense of justice. In essence, what Hulme argues is that every individual brings their own agenda, applying the challenge of climate change to their own problems, that is, climate change is the raw material that is used to work on our individual projects. Hulme suggested we ask ourselves whether stabilising the climate was indeed our ultimate goal or whether stabilising climate was instead a means to an end, and we were using climate change to achieve our other goals.

Emma Tomkins on the other hand bases her work on a belief that climate change is happening and asserts that the government is leading the way on adaptation. Based at Leeds and the Government’s Department for International Development, Tomkins outlined types of adaptation currently being implemented including risk management policies and attempts to build resilience. When Tomkins asked the audience how many were currently taking adaptive measures, it became clear that the line between what constitutes mitigation activities and adaption is often blurred in the minds of many. The government makes a clear distinction between mitigation measures (limiting ones emissions) and adaption (preparing for the impacts of climate change). For instance when asked about what types of adaptation individuals were taking, some audience members mentioned the work of the Transition Town movements, but from the government perspective Transition Town activities would constitute mitigation measures as their main focus is reducing emissions.

Tomkins conducted an exercise to see how we as an audience would allocate adaptation funds, whether we would base our decisions on: equitable distribution of resources, reward mitigators, help those facing the most exposure, help the most vulnerable, or offer developmental assistance. At the moment, current government policy (Adaptation Policy Framework) is based on risk mapping and awareness and therefore has its focus on those who face the most exposure to risk. Tomkins stressed the need to be aware that in any adaptation policy there are a number of decisions to be made about the type of losses we are willing to take and warned that there is a potential to make serious mistakes unless we seriously consider the issues.

Charlie Kronick weighed in with the activist viewpoint, reminding the audience that in the past adaptation wasn’t even considered because to do so would be to accept defeat. Further, he didn’t see the need to separate out adaptation and mitigation as he sees them as one and the same. For Charlie, climate change isn’t about science, or art, but about power politics, ‘the deal makers and takers’ and inequality is a major driver.

Hulme agreed that it’s about politics and our ambitions about what type of society we want to inherit. Hulme suggested that perhaps climate change was indeed a zombie concept, and as a metaphor it has done its work. As a concept, it connects a large swathe of issues combined through the scientific narrative and perhaps there are other ways to make progress.

Kellie Payne is a PhD student in the Geography department at the Open University researching culture and climate change

How social media will change the way the arts present themselves

I have an article in this fortnight’s Arts Professional arguing that the arts need to get to grips with the idea that a mother of a change is a’coming, and about how the arts have a chance to build a strong, resilient network in the face of coming cuts by adopting a new, generous approach:

… we have reached a tipping point. The gap between what new and old media deliver us yawning. This changes how opinions are formed and how audiences are reached. It also raises interesting questions about where high quality criticism is going to come from in the future.

On the surface there’s a simple conclusion to be reached from the arrival of the Twitterati. Arts organisations need to think more about social media. The Barbican website already has a social media networks button on its front page. Fine idea. Twitter can fill empty seats within a couple of  hours of a performace. But at the moment that’s where most people’s thinking stops. This is a mistake because the change is fundamental. Arts organisations, if big enough, used to hire press officers on the strength of their contacts book, but what does that mean now? It’s not just the dipping circulations – accelerated by the recession, newspaper advertising revenues are expected to fall by as much as 21% across the board this year. This means cuts. Emails to old contacts suddenly bounce; they’ve gone freelance. Talent is leaching away from old media. The money spent trying to get column inches is increasingly money less well spent[…] but that’s just the half of it.

Conventional arts websites have become good at doing two things. They list events coming up and sell you tickets to them. If you’re lucky there’s a blog, but it’s often pretty thin fare. These sites exist within a fast-changing internet filled with people sharing news, wit, opinion, photographs, films and music. In comparison arts websites often look staid and monumental […] The key word is “sharing”. If arts websites want to move from the vertical model – telling people what’s good for them – to the horizontal model of using the energy of social networks, then it’s about giving stuff away. As any sociologist will tell you, the basis of any social network, real or virtual, is reciprocity.

Read the whole article HERE.

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology

Tipping Point to commission climate change performances – 4 May deadline

Editors’ note: This commission is unique among those dealing with art and climate change in its focus on performance and theatre.

The Tipping Point Commissions are inviting artists to submit proposals for new performance work in the context of climate change. The proposals will be considered by a selection panel, leading to around four commission awards of at most £30,000.

The theme of climate change is intended to provide a springboard for the commissions. Artists are invited to submit projects that stimulate audiences towards the radical and imaginative thinking necessary to comprehend a world dominated by climate change. The Tipping Point Commissions are seeking proposals that offer creative reflections on a world that is rapidly changing and on humanity’s role and responsibilities within it.

Proposals can be made by practitioners of any performance discipline, as individuals or groups, by artists on their own or together with curators or producers.

Proposals must be submitted by 4 May at 5pm. Shortlisted applicants will be invited to develop ideas and attend an interview. The selection panel which will include:

  • Graham Devlin: Chairman, Tipping Point (Chairman of Selection Panel)
  • John Ashton: UK Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change 
  • Nick Starr: Executive Director, National Theatre 
  • Maresa von Stockert: Director, Tilted Productions 
  • Cecilia Wee: Writer, Broadcaster and Curator

The criteria for the TippingPoint Commissions and the application form is available here.For further information, contact Angela McSherry.

www.tippingpoint.org.uk/commissions

Go to the Ashden Directory