Tim Collins

Reflections on CO2 Edenburgh from Creative Carbon Scotland

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Project Summary

CO2 Edenburgh arose out of the opportunity to collaborate with ecoartscotland, Art Space Nature, artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto and programming professional Chris Malcolm on an exhibition in the ECA Tent Gallery during the Edinburgh Art Festival 2013. Broadly the project sought to uncover the invisible effects of Edinburgh’s festivals on the city’s CO2 levels, engaging audiences in local CO2 levels affected by various factors; topography of the city, traffic, audiences breathing out, green spaces etc. The project used cutting edge technology to capture CO2 levels provided by two Scotland-based companies, Gas Sensing Solutions and Envirologger.

What did we do?

For the duration of the exhibition Creative Carbon Scotland moved their office to the Tent Gallery to invigilate the exhibition and make the most of the public presence of CCS during the festival.

The project consisted of four main elements:

  • The Tent Gallery exhibition with real-time data displays for stationary CO2 monitors placed in various outdoor locations including Princes St Gardens and Arthur’s Seat and indoor venues such as Fruitmarket Gallery and National Gallery of Scotland
  • Guided tours of the city with portable CO2 sensors and LED displays led by Carbon Catchers Catriona Patterson and Dave Young
  • Four discussions curated by ecoartscotland asking the question – Can art change the climate?
  • An online blog and summary of discussions.

What did we achieve?

Having reflected upon the project, we feel that one of the key achievements has been to establish CCS as a more public-facing organisation as well as rooting the organisation more firmly in the space of arts and sustainability. We feel the discussions were a big success, serving as an important platform for bringing together individuals and organisations in our area of work and binding the different elements of the project through the exploration of some key themes.

Here are some key points from the discussions

Discussion 1: Bringing the emotion of the arts to bear on the rigour of the sciences

  • Harry Giles made the point that much of what artists and scientists do is the same and they are comparable in their ‘making sense of the insensible’. CO2 Edenburgh was considered in terms of finding a new aesthetic for new experiences such as invisible rising CO2 levels.
  • It was discussed that there is currently a lack of feedback loop particularly in cities which serves to make us aware of the environmental consequences of our actions. Artists can therefore play a role in making these consequences more visible.

Discussion 2: Art, technology, activism and knowledge in the age of climate change

  • Wallace Heim referenced Alan Badiou for whom there are four critical kinds of event which change people – love, politics, art and science. Amongst these art can create the conditions which change our perception of reality and cause us to change our behaviour.
  • Architect Simon Beeson raised the point that CO2 isn’t in itself ‘bad’. In fact it’s only the release of currently fossilised carbon into the atmosphere as CO2 that is a problem. Carbon and CO2 is what we and allof the living world is made out of. CO2 Edenburgh allows us to perceive the complexity of the pattern of CO2 in central Edinburgh.
  • We also discussed the need to be clear about the distinctive contribution artists can make to social and environmental issues without falling into categories such as communicators of science or public engagement.

Discussion 3: Environmental monitoring: Tracking nature in pursuit of aesthetic inter-relationship?

  • Prof Andrew Patrizio took Renaissance Florence as an example of a time at which artists and audiences were attuned to a similar mercantile approach to understanding the form and content of a work of art. Parallels were drawn between Renaissance Italy and now – both times at which paradigm shifts were taking place in terms of how humans understood themselves in relation to the environment.
  • Jan Hogarth provided the example of Dumfries and Galloway as an exciting new region for the links between arts and policy making. Its rural setting allows for a particular proximity between artists, local authorities and organisations such as the Forestry Commission and therefore a stronger influencing role on the part of artists and arts organisations.

Discussion 4: Going beyond the material: Environment and Invisible Forces in the literary, performing and visual arts

  • Lucy Miu opened a discussion about how information + insight or emotion can help engage people more than information alone and may be able to help transmit the essence of something to those who weren’t able to experience it directly. She touched upon the fact that performing arts events are invariably group events, whilst visual art can be experienced more solitarily.
  • We also discussed the idea that in the performing arts and literature the ‘work of art’ is less concrete, existing in the ether between performer and audience or in the mind of the reader and not wholly contained in the reproduction of the words – as demonstrated by the breadth of ways in which literary works are transmitted, from the e-reader to the audio book.
  • Sam Clark noted that scientists working on matter connect the visible and the invisible, just like artists connecting the knowable and the ineffable. But whilst scientists aim to make the strange familiar, perhaps artists’ desire is to do the opposite and make the familiar strange…

The post Blog: Reflections on CO2 Edenburgh appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Sprit in the Air Exhibition Opening Invite

co2_eden_burgh_banner_550Creative Carbon ScotlandCollins and Goto Studio with Chris Malcolm, ecoartscotland and Art Space Nature are pleased to invite you to

Spirit In The Air

Opening: Friday 2 August 6-8pm

at the Tent Gallery, Edinburgh College of Art, Westport, Edinburgh EH3 9DF

(refreshments will be provided)

Spirit in the Air is a visual art, technology and performance project exploring the impacts of the Edinburgh Festivals on climate change. Working with ground-breaking technology generously supplied by Gas Sensing Systems and Envirologger to measure real-time carbon dioxide (CO2) levels when Edinburgh is packed to bursting with artistic activity and people, eminent environmental artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto will work with Chris Malcolm to ask ‘Can art change the climate?’

‘Carbon Catchers’ will roam the streets and parks of Edinburgh to seek out CO2 hotspots whilst the artists at the Tent Gallery use the measurements to make the invisible comprehensible through visual and sound works.

Spirit in the Air is part of the Edinburgh Art Festival and will be open Monday to Friday, 12 noon-5pm, from 2 – 22 August at the Tent Gallery on Westport, Edinburgh EH3 9DF. For more information click here.

In addition to the exhibition, a discussion programme curated by ecoartscotland will consider questions of art, science, activism and environmentalism in a Festival-long conversation.

Wednesday 7 August 3-5pm, Tent Gallery

Bringing the emotion of the arts to bear on the rigour of the sciences

Saturday 10 August 1.30 – 4pm, Tent Gallery

Art, technology, activism and knowledge in the age of climate change (book here for this event)

Wednesday 14 August 3-5pm, Tent Gallery

Environmental monitoring: Tracking nature in pursuit of aesthetic inter-relationship?

Wednesday 21 August 3-5pm, Tent Gallery

Going beyond the material: Environment and Invisible Forces in the literary, performing and visual arts

For more information contact ben@creativecarbonscotland.com

 

Please forward this invite to anyone who might be interested.

Landscape Dissertation/Project Prizes

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Tim Collins highlighted that nominations are invited by the Landscape Research Group for PhD, Masters and Undergraduate dissertations and projects.

The deadline for submissions:

  • Undergraduate prizes is 15 September 2012,
  • MA and PhD prizes are both 15 November 2012.
  • Announcement will be made by 30 May 2013.

See below for further details:

Landscape Research Group is an interdisciplinary organisation the members of which include academics and practitioners from a range of disciplines including geography, landscape design, landscape architecture and planning. The Group publishes the scholarly journal Landscape Research. Part of the Group’s remit is to encourage innovative research on landscape related issues amongst students.

To this end we now have three Doctoral degree prizes, three prizes for Masters dissertations or projects and three prizes for undergraduate dissertations. The prizes are available to students who have completed a PhD, Masters degree or undergraduate degree and have produced a dissertation and/or project in a subject area with a landscape focus in the year Oct 2011 – Oct 2012.

We have also established a new online prize environment that asks course directors and research degree coordinators to register and nominate students online. If you are interested in doing so, please send me an email with your name, your academic title, as well as university address, email and phone number to awards@landscaperesearch.org. You will be enrolled on our system and able to nominate students directly. Once nominated students will receive an email with instruction to upload their thesis and supporting appendices to be considered for a prize. [http://www.landscaperesearch.org/student_section] .

Landscape Research Group Prizes

    • Up to three Doctoral Prizes at £500 for original contributions to knowledge
    • Up to three Masters Prizes at £350 for significant academic and creative inquiry
    • Up to three Undergraduate Prizes at £250 each for rigorous analysis and output

We make our prizes in a broad range of fields as befitting the landscape topic. We request that course leaders or doctoral programme coordinators make their nomination in one of three categories, also identifying the academic area (to the subject level) in your school that provided the academic setting and primary academic support for the degree.

Our categories include:

    • Humanities: Including cultural geography, history, archaeology, literature or philosophy.
    • Science, Planning and Management: material geography, environmental management, material geography, planning, and science.
    • Art and Design: architecture, art, design and landscape architecture.

For further information see the Landscape Research Group website.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Anthroposcene

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Prof Tim Collins and I presented Anthropo-scene Evolution at AHM’s State of Play symposium in Dundee at the beginning of October.  The article The age of man is not a disaster  in the NYTimes sets the scene for the arguments around the new terminology of anthroposcene.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Too Shallow for Diving

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Review of the exhibition Too Shallow for Diving: the 21st Century is Treading Water. The review contextualises current environmental and ecological arts practices across a wide range of media.  The review discusses in detail work in the exhibition by Tim Collins + Reiko Goto, Carolyn Speranza, Prudence Gill, Jim Denney, Richard Harned, Roger Laib, Jamie Gruzska, Wendy Osher, Ann T. Rosenthal and Steffi Domike, Vanessa German, Maritza Mosquera, Lisa Link, David Stairs.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

AHM’s State of Play, Dundee

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AHM‘s final State of Play event takes place in Dundee on Saturday 1 October.

As with previous events it will include a number of ‘One Minute Manifestos’.  One of these has emerged through a collective process of writing initiated by Tim Collins and contributed to by a number of participants in the Values of Environmental Writing programme at Glasgow University.

Tim has asked me to post the manifesto and authorship, and to encourage anyone who broadly supports the manifesto, and is at the State of Play symposium, to come forward and share in the speaking of the manifesto.

“Who are we? Though the origins of this manifesto are the Values of Environmental Research Network conversations, this document is inclusive of all those who feel that the arts and humanities have a vital role in the effort to mitigate and prevent environmental damage.”

The Anthropo-scene Evolution

2011 saw the culmination of avarice that necessitates naming the human impact on all earthly things. In response we wish to reject humanity’s supposed dominion over nature and to take responsibility for wilful and excessive impact. Our intention is to constitute greater empathy between the world’s free-living things. As creative pragmatists committed to producing practical wisdom, we recognise a loss of humility and seek to reengage the aesthetic and the sublime, which provide interface and witness to spirit on earth. Cultural responses to the anthropo-scene realize that there are opportunities embedded in new constraints; but more importantly there is generative force amongst living things that must be engaged anew. We experiment with a new materialism and aim for new metaphysical purpose for the arts and humanities within the public domain.

Background

Draft1 scribed by Tim Collins (TC) with Reiko Goto, 18 June 2011, subsequently edited by Tom Bristow and Chris Maughan, with comments and encouragement from Aaron Franks and Chris Fremantle (CF). The AHM ‘State of Play in Scotland’ submission was initiated by CF. TC offered the first rough draft with proper word editing by Aaron Franks and Rachel Harkness, followed by strategic refinement by Rhian Williams, Kate Foster, Alistair McIntosh and Owain Jones. The full manifesto is a result of discussion that occurred on 17 June, 2011 with Aaron Franks, Owain Jones, Chris Maughan, Mike Robinson and Karen Syse. Tom Bristow and the ‘frog team’ were present in spirit if not in material form. The work was inspired and energized by presentations and dialogue with Alistair McIntosh and Gareth Evans all set within the wider context of the AHRC supported Values of Environmental Writing Network, organized by Hayden Lorimer, Alex Benchimol and Rhian Williams (2011).

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Beyond Planning

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Nine Mile Run Greenway Project (1996-2000), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Image courtesy Reiko Goto, Tim Collins, Robert Bingham, John Stephen.

www.publicartscotland.com published a ‘Thoughts and Responses’ piece entitled Beyond Planning by two long time colleagues from Pittsburgh, Denys Candy and Reiko Goto. Candy was in Scotland to consult on the Helix project in Falkirk and Goto has been doing her PhD with On The Edge at Gray’s School of Art. Both represent long term grassroots, localist and pedagogically radical approaches to working with communities. Neither flit between public art projects telling stories of how their work transforms communities, nor do they place primary value on ambiguity.

Denys Candy paints an idyllic picture of Vermont in the snow, whilst at the same time contextualising it within a longer term understanding of the likely impacts of global warming on one local industry – the production of maple syrup. For anyone who enjoys that epitome of North American cuisine, pancakes, bacon and maple syrup, the loss will seem one of personal luxury, but as Candy points out others will lose jobs, income and cultural identity.

He then shifts focus, bringing us back to Pittsburgh, to the history of a steel town. The key juxtaposition in this movement from Vermont to Pittsburgh is the ability to ‘touch nature.’ From a location where that is easy, to one where it has been much harder, he’s not concerned with theoretical questions about what nature is, or what wildness is, but rather the simple pleasure and documented benefits to health and well-being of access to nature.

Denys drills down into the specific history of ‘urban renewal’ in Pittsburgh, of de-population, freeways creating isolation, ‘white flight’ and suburban sprawl. His position is that,

“…we need to embellish, improve upon conventional or apparently rational planning methods by adopting attitudes and practices that I call creative regeneration, predicated on asking deep questions and addressing them in practice, collaboratively and collectively.”

His methodology is grounded in two questions framed by Terri Baltimore, who co-founded Find the Rivers! with him,

“How do we heal post industrial cities rent by the trauma of demolition, discrimination and displacement,” and, “What strategies and methods bring more well-being, defined as improvements in economic, ecological, physiological and cultural health?”

He characterises three stages of “unfolding action,” involving “Re-experiencing, Re-imagining, Re-making,” and he touches on the application of this process in an area called “the Hill” in Pittsburgh. His process is exemplary and bears much deeper reading to really understand.

Reiko connects Denys’ project on “the Hill” to her and her partner Tim Collins’ work in Pittsburgh where, over a similar ten year period, they undertook two related projects, Nine Mile Run and 3 Rivers 2nd Nature. She connects by describing the experience of being invited to participate in Denys processes, and reciprocating by inviting him to participate in her and Tim’s processes.

Reiko and Tim’s methodology, like Denys’, is rooted in ecological and cultural understanding. All are intimately familiar with the history of the place and people they are working with. All place the highest value on working within communities, All have strong aesthetic understanding driving their work. Reiko highlights the work of Suzanne Lacy, artist and teacher, and Grant Kester, art historian and theorist, who provide a framework for understanding the conversational as an aesthetic mode, and the convivial as a form rather than a method or intention.

When artists such as Lacy, Goto and Collins, Candy and others specify conversation as an aesthetic, they are not primarily focusing on the instance of the conversation, the immanent experience of it at any one point, but rather the conversation as a durational performance.

For these artists, the conversation is the 10 year conversation in a place, with many, many people through formal and informal processes. Within the conversation there will be formal public meetings; there will be intentional activities such as trips to see and experience places and all the associated experiences; there will also be the informal and chance encounters. Some elements of the conversation will be about the artists learning both from the locals and specialists. Other elements of the conversation will be about the community learning from itself, sometimes reflected through the artists. There will be tough moments and convivial moments, but the convivial will be what is remembered.

The idea that conversation is an aesthetic is informed by performance art more than visual art. The cues are in Allan Kaprow’s scores for Happenings, intentionally purposeless activities that engage participants in a negotiation of shared experience. By way of an aside, the researchers of On The Edge, at the instigation of Anne Douglas, took Kaprow’s score Calendar (1971) as focus for work over the last year. The way that Kaprow’s scores function as a boundary and orientation point around which a number of people with disparate interests negotiate creative action and creative relationship became sharply clear.

Another cue is in the radical/critical pedagogies of in particular Paolo Friere. Friere’s concern that learning needs to acknowledge power relations, and through developing an understanding of the historical context (which of course in his context was colonialism and in these artists’ capital, industry and racism) enable and empower individuals and communities to shape their own futures. This had a significant influence on late 60s and 70s feminist methods such as consciousness raising, and more recently Ranciere’s text The Ignorant Schoolmaster revisited these ideas.

The role of the artist and teacher is critical in these processes, and both Reiko and Denys are at pains to avoid constructing this in any heroic or charismatic mode.

Reiko articulates Denys’ role in a way that is normally framed in terms of glue or connecting,

“His work is like the essential but tiny knots between the pearls in the necklace. He keeps many different stakeholders and interests from rubbing against each other. It also keeps the whole project secure by maintaining each activity as a connected but separate entity. Denys helps to hold the integrity of a community that consists of many kinds of people.”

Her nuanced analogy of a string of pearls, being both the string that connects and also the knots that keep elements from rubbing together, is very effective.

Another relevant aspect of understanding the aesthetic of conversation comes from the work of Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison. They describe learning from their project Atempause Für Den Sava-Fluss that something they have come to call ‘conversational drift’ is a beneficial outcome. The project developed a discursive approach to the riparian landscape which increased the amount of clean water in the river Sava. Although interrupted by the Yugoslav war, their proposals were implemented with EU funding. Their assistant on the project went on to employ, iterate and evolve the approach developed by the artists on another nearby river, the Drava. The Harrisons’ concept of ‘conversational drift’ articulates the way that a conversation (in this larger sense) can move away from you, but carry on, and then come back into your life having developed in its own way. This throws into sharp relief the values and characteristics of a conversational aesthetic.

This short thought and reflection, written by two masters, barely touches the surface of the knowledge, wisdom and experience of the writers.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Bibliography of an artist

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The artist and researcher Tim Collins just sent me two lists – his own publications as well as the Goto and Collins bibliography – texts that have influenced their artwork, research and writing.  Below is Collins’ list of publications.  I am adding both to the ecoartscotland bibliography as a separate page because they represent a research tool in themselves.

Collins, T (2012 forthcoming) Art, Imagination and Contradiction in Landscape. In Thompson, I. Howard , P. And Waterton, E. (Eds) Companion to Landscape Studies. London: Routledge

Goto, R. Collins, T. (2011 forthcoming) LIVING Things – The ethical, aesthetic impulse. In Brady, E. And Phemister, P. (Eds.) Embodied Values and the Environment. London: Springer-Verlag.

Collins, T. (2010) 3 Rivers 2nd Nature 2000-2005, Water, Land & Dialogue. Revue d’art Canadienne / Canadian Art Review, Vol 35 Issue3. Canada Universities Art Association of Canada.

Collins, T. (2008) Can or Should Artists Attempt to Creative Verifiable Change?In O’Reilly, S., Beauchamp, P. (Eds.) Sense in Place, Site-ations International. Cardiff, Wales: Centre for Research in art and Design, University of Wales Institute Cardiff, and Dublin: Dublin Institute of Technology DIT, Ireland.

Tarr, J, Muller, T. and Collins, T. (2008) Pittsburgh’s Three Rivers From Industrial to Environmental Infrastructure.In Mauch, C. and Zeller, t. (Eds.) Rivers in History: Designing and Conceiving Waterways in Europe and North America. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Collins, T. (2008) Art Nature and Aesthetics in the Post Industrial Public Realm.In France, R. (Ed.) Healing Nature, Repairing Relationships: Restoring Ecological Spaces and Consciousness. Chicago, ILL: Green Frigate Books.

Collins, T. (2007) Catalytic Aesthetics.In the publication from the conference, Artful Ecologies, Falmouth: University College Falmouth.

Collins, T. and Goto, R. (2005)An Ecological Context.In Miles, M. (Ed.) New Practices/New Pedagogies: Emerging Contexts, Practices and Pedagogies in Europe and North America. Lisse, Netherlands: Swets and Zeitlinger.

Goto, R. andCollins, T. (2005)Mapping Social and Ecological Practices. In Miles, M. (Ed.) New Practices/New Pedagogies: Emerging Contexts, Practices and Pedagogies in Europe and North America. Lisse, Netherlands: Swets and Zeitlinger.

Collins, T. (2004)Aesthetic Diversity.In Strelow, H. David, V., (Eds.) Herman Prigann – Ecological Aesthetics: Theoretical Practice of Artistic Environmental Design. Berlin, Germany: Berkhäuser Verlag, AG.

Collins, T. (2003)Lyrical Expression, Critical Engagement, Transformative Action: An Introduction to Art and the Environment. Community arts network: Reading Room,Arts and the Environment [online]. Burnham, L. (Ed.), [cited 22nd February 2007]. Accessed via Community Arts Network at: <http://www.communityarts.net/readingroom/archivefiles/2003/06/lyrical_express.php> (Subsequently translated into German) Lyrischer Ausdruck, Kritisches Engagement, Transformative Aktion. Hagia Chora Magazine, #17, 1/2004. Germany: Dietzenbach. pp. 14-19. (translated into French), Expression Lyrique, Engagement Critique, Action Transformatrice : une Introduction à l’Art et à l’Environnement. In Ecologie et Politique, #36, June 2008,Éditions Syllepse.France: Paris ) pp. 127-153.

Collins, T. and Goto, R. (2003)Art, Landscape, Ecology and Change. In Hall, T. and Miles, M. (Ed.)Urban Futures. London:Routledge.

Collins, T. (2003)Postindustrielle Landschaft-Nine Mile Run: Interventions in the Rust Belt: The Art and Ecology of Post-Industrial Public Space. In Genske, G.D. and Hauser, S . (Ed.) Die Brache als Chance:Eing Transdisziplinarer Dialog Uber Verbrauchte Flachen. Berlin, Germany:Springer-Verlag.

Collins, T. (2002)Conversations in the Rust Belt. In Herzogenrath, B.(Ed.)From Virgin Land to Disney World: Nature and Its Discontents in the America of Yesterday and Today. Amsterdam and Atlanta: and Rodopi.

Pinkham, R. and Collins, T. (2002)Post-Industrial Watersheds: Retrofits and restorative redevelopment (Pittsburgh Pennsylvania). In France, R.L. (Ed.) The Handbook of Water Sensitive Planning and Design. London, New York, Washington D.C.: Lewis Publishers.

Collins, T.(2001)The Rust–Belt Dialogues: An Artists Concept Model for Public Dialogue about Urban Stream Restoration. Ecological Restoration,19(3).

Collins, T. (2001)3 Rivers – 2nd Nature the River Dialogues. InBennet S. and Butler, J. (Ed.)Localities and Regeneration and Diverse(c)ities.Exeter: University of Plymouth, Bristol: Intellect Publishing.

Ferguson, B., Pinkham, R. and Collins, T.(1999) Re-Evaluating Stormwater, The Nine Mile Run Model for Restorative Development. Snowmass Colorado: Rocky Mountain Institute.

Collins, T., Dzombak, D., Rawlins, J., and Tamminga, K., Thompson, S.(1999) Nine Nile Run Watershed, Rivers Conservation Plan. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania:PA Dept of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Collins, T. and Savage, K.(1998)Learning to See Assets as Well as Liabilities, opportunities as Well as Constraints. Public Work, Management and Policy,2(3), pp. 210-219

Bingham, B., Collins, T., Goto, R., and Stephen, J.(1998) Ample Opportunity: A Community Dialogue. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University.

Collins, T. and Goto, R. (1997)Urban Reclamation. Leonardo,30(3).

Collins, T., Goto, R., Barnes, R., and Yuen, S.(1993) Aqua Pura(V. Trostle, V. andJ. Redensek ed.).San Francisco California: San Francisco Art Commission and the San Francisco Department of Water.

Collins, T., Farabough, L., Oppenheimer, and M., Richards, P. (1991) Art Along the Waterfront: A Guide to Opportunities for Public Artists and Public Art on the Embarcadero of San Francisco(J. Redensek ed.).Sacramento California:The California State Arts Council.

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland