Theaters

Sustainability in Theater Unconference (SIT-U 2013) Registration now open

SIT_logo_web_smRegistration now open

Last year, we presented the first national Sustainability in Theater conference. Please join the Minnesota Theatre Alliance August 19-20, 2013 for a reunion at this year’s Unconference. Compared to 2012’s gathering, the 2013 event at the Southern Theater will be less structured with a greater emphasis on energetic discussions, using Open Space format. All topics related to sustainable practices for our organizations, our craft, our environment, and our community are welcome.

Early bird registration is only $15-$20 per person if you register before by July 15th!

Learn more and register now at http://mntheateralliance.org/content/register-sit-u

See the SIT 2012 conference archive at http://minnesotatheateralliance.org/sit/archive_about.php

Learn about Open Space meeting format at http://www.openspaceworld.org/cgi/wiki.cgi?AboutOpenSpace

Join the Sustainable Theaters Group on our Web site at http://sustain.minnesotatheateralliance.org/

Like the Sustainable Theaters Group Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/SustainableTheatersMN

 

Minnesota Theater Alliance

308 Prince St. #270

Saint Paul, MN 55101-1437

(651) 789-0787

 

Web: http://mntheateralliance.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaTheaterAlliance

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheaterAlliance

Sustainability in Theater Conference Recordings Online Now!

Sustainability in Theater: People, Planet, Profit, Purpose

A blended conference dedicated to providing tangible, practical strategies to implementing greener theater practices, ensuring theaters remain a vital part of our community.

Day One (WEBCASTED LIVE): Learn

A full day of learning and networking, featuring sustainability experts, sustainability in theater pioneers and success stories.

All Day One activities were broadcast online – and are NOW AVAILABLE.

Please find the recording of the conference online! http://bnw.qwikcast.tv/

2nd Thought Theatre Returns to Dallas, goes green

Last year STT went green.  We switched to purely internet based marketing and eliminated playbills in favor of digital projections.  We used the money we saved to pay more to our artists as we strive to be a leader in production quality in the community. This year we are taking things one step further.  Audiences will use their smart phones to either download the playbill to their device at home or scan a QR code to interact with the website and download the playbill to their device once they arrive.  Other theaters tell you to turn your cell phones off.  But not us.  We want you to leave them on, in silent mode of course,” said Chris LaBove.

Second Thought Theatre will be announcing the 2011-2012 Season in the coming weeks.

All shows in STT’s 2011-2012 Mainstage Season will be performed in Bryant Hall on the Kalita Humphreys Campus, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd Dallas, TX 75129.  To make a donation or to find out more information, please visit www.2tt.co

via 2nd Thought Theatre Returns to Dallas.

sustainability in theatre


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The Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, a Los Angeles-based non-profit arts infrastructure organisation, presents an overview of current trends and practices in sustainability for theatre from around the world. We will be looking at UK initiatives from Julie’s Bicycle, the Arcola Theatre and White Light LTD, as well as those of the Broadway Green Alliance, York University in Toronto, Mo’olelo Performing Arts in San Diego and other theaters, arts organisations and artists from around the globe. Join us to learn about the growing momentum towards ecologically-minded arts making! www.sustainablepractice.org/fringe

Sustainability in Theatre | Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2010

The Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, a Los Angeles-based non-profit arts infrastructure organisation, presents an overview of current trends and practices in sustainability for theatre from around the world. We will be looking at UK initiatives from Julie’s Bicycle, the Arcola Theatre and White Light LTD, as well as those of the Broadway Green Alliance, York University in Toronto, Mo’olelo Performing Arts in San Diego and other theaters, arts organisations and artists from around the globe. Join us to learn about the growing momentum towards ecologically-minded arts making! www.sustainablepractice.org/fringe

via Sustainability in Theatre | Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2010.

Ten Things Theaters Need to Do Right Now to Save Themselves – Theater – The Stranger, Seattle’s Only Newspaper

1.Enough with the goddamned Shakespeare already.

2.Tell us something we don’t know

3.Produce dirty, fast, and often.

4.Get them young.

5.Offer child care

6.Fight for real estate

7.Build bars

8.Boors’ night out

9.Expect poverty

10.Drop out of graduate school

via Ten Things Theaters Need to Do Right Now to Save Themselves – Theater – The Stranger, Seattle’s Only Newspaper.

Message vs. Action

This Post was originally posted to Mike Lawler’s ecoTheaer blog on April 25, 2007. We are reposting it here to share this ecoTheater classic with new readers while MIke continues to regain his health. You can read his blog about his ongoing battle with cancer, The “C” Word, by clicking here.

In 1992, American Theatre ran an article called Green Theatre: Confessions of an Eco-reporter, in which Lynn Jacobson traveled to three performing arts companies–Merrimack Repertory in Lowell, MA, the Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans, and Dell’Arte Players Company in northern California–and wrote about the work they were doing on the allegedly emerging front of “Green Theatre.”

In the fall of this year my first published foray into “greening” our theaters is slated to appear in the pages of American Theatre too–over fifteen years after Jacobson wrote, at the close of her piece, “Can theatre save the earth? I don’t know. But from sea to polluted sea, I’ve seen it trying.” Well, Jacobson was certainly right about one thing: Theater can’t save the earth–at least not alone. But, it does seem that it can make more of an effort than it has. Because, though Jacobson failed to really take it into account in 1992, the greening of our theater isn’t just about putting on ecologically themed work. It’s also about putting on ecologically friendly work, whether it be new, old, experimental, or otherwise.

In my research, I am struggling to find theater artists out there who are striving for a more sustainable approach to theater production. If you are one, or know of one, get in touch with me–I’d love to hear from you.