Solar Power

Two sustainable art shows

This post comes to you from Cultura21

August 3nd – October 30th, Arte SusteMobile, Hamburg / RE-ART t(W)oo, Otterndorf (Germany)

Arte SusteMobile  is an art and design exhibition which focuses on sustainable traffic and mobility. Some of the themes exhibited are : art in public transport, innovative means of public transport, human powered vehicles, flying and driving with hydrogen and solar power, solar airships, bionic structured airplanes, one world transport, energy efficient and noise reductive technologies and much more… In total over 70 artists, designers and university teams from 20 nations are involved.

RE-ART t(W)oo – shows art and design in the context of recycling, waste and social development. 55 artists from 15 nations exhibiting their works made from all kind of waste and scrap plus other positions pointing onto social and ecological problems and challenges.

Both exhibitions are curated by Samuel J. Fleiner.

For more information about the project : click here and here

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Powered by WPeMatico

TRANSported and Digging Deeper 2 new exhibitions from ecoartspace NY

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

200x104xcbcff747f1caeb2e8d22a022c43a305b.jpg.pagespeed.ic.KUQuFfjopGecoartspace NY currently has two new exhibitions on view. TRANSported, commissioned by Arts Brookfield is presented as part of the New Museum’s Ideas City Festival 2013. TRANSported features two site-specific, interactive installations housed within and utilizing the unique features of the 20-foot shipping container. Both projects relate to the Festival’s theme of “Untapped Capital.”

Tender, by Seth Kinmont

Seth Kinmont, whose project Tender begins in Sara D. Roosevelt Park on the Lower East Side as part of Ideas City Streetfest on May 1st, engages the public with a sculptural installation and daily performance. Seth Kinmont will mint and issue his own currency out of his shipping container. The project will present visitors with freshly stamped coins and newly printed bills whose value shifts from fixed to fluid, transforming the items into a kind of lottery ticket that could be considered a souvenir, a token, a piece of art in itself — or a chance to win a work of art that has the potential to generate its own value. Tender will move to Brookfield Place on May 6th.

Art Pac-Kit, 2 artists studios complete with solar panels, green roof and rainwater collection

Habitat for Artists, an artist collective based in New York’s Hudson Valley, transforms their metal container into a vehicle for dialog and conversation in their piece called Art Pac-Kit. Two hybrid studios and a central hub for shared engagement become evolving spaces for a series of public interactions with groups such as Solar One and the Hudson Valley Seed Library as well as individuals that explore aspects of self-reliance. Solar power and rainwater will be collected from the rooftop, which will also be home to a square-foot garden, while exterior walls will be covered with a vertical garden and a public message board where visitors can leave written suggestions and ideas. Discussions on conservation and sustainability will be held in a central hub connecting the studios. Both projects will remain on view at Brookfield Place (formerly World Financial Center Plaza) and open to the public daily from 10am – 6pm through May 27th.

“My title TRANSported refers to the history of this site as a shipping port where New York Harbor meets the Atlantic Ocean. TRANSported also suggests ways in which Seth Kinmont and Habitat for Artists are both using materials to visually transport viewers into different realities and presenting possibilities for the imagination to soar. As a curator whose work has long focused on environmental issues, I am thrilled to be working with the Ideas City Festival’s theme of Untapped Capital which states as their goal: an examination of surplus resources that may be under-recognized or underutilized, ranging from people and raw materials, to ideas, networks, varied resources, and modes of communication and provides a meeting place for developing alternative thinking as regards new methodologies, new solutions, and new goals.” Amy Lipton

Digging Deeper at Franklin Street Works in Stamford CT is a component of Strange Invitation which brings together 3 collaborative teams. The exhibition asks “What happens when you invite an artist who defines him/herself as both social activist and organizer to do a project at a gallery space?” Each component of Strange Invitation reflects a mix of art and activism, addressing themes informed by the participants in-depth work with local communities. Digging Deeper focuses on sustainable agriculture, entrepreneurship, and artists who create projects informed by our relationships to natural environments. The exhibition includes an outdoor artist studio and greenhouse created by Simon Draper and Michael Asbill, as part of Habitat for Artists (HFA) in partnership with the Hudson Valley Seed Library; The Franklin Street Works Heritage Garden and Farmstand by Andrea Reynosa, a civic ecology investigation into local youth, regional watershed/foodshed awareness, heirloom crop production and entrepreneurship; and a gallery exhibition featuring works by Joan Bankemper, Andrea Reynosa, Jenna Spevack, Elaine TinNyo, Linda Weintraub and HFA. Digging Deeper is on view at Franklin Street Works through June 16, 2013. The art space and café are open to the public on Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday: 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. with extended hours on Thursdays, 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Linda Weintraub, Let Us Eat the Colors of Nature’s Spectrumconsists of twenty-sixfoods harvested from Weintraub’s gardens, preserved through canning, and arrayed according to the color continuum they suggest.

ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

Powered by WPeMatico

Top Solar Power US States (Per Capita)

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Of course lists, top-tens and the like are a very particular way of seeing the world, but this analysis, published on the blog CleanTechnica, of the USA by State and population is very interesting.  It shows how much solar PV is installed per capita (i.e. per head of population).  They have also published stats for wind power.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Sustainia100 – 100 sustainable solutions

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Sustainia is a consortium of partners representing civil society, businesses and experts. The concept of “Sustainia” is developed by the Scandinavian think tank Monday Morning in a collaborative effort with global companies and foundations.

It is a concept for communicating a sustainable future based on concrete and tangible know-how and technologies – a global collaborative platform for building a model and vision for a sustainable future. The model of Sustainia represents best practice, knowledge and technologies that already exist. It is inspired and designed by world leading companies, institutions and experts.

Sustainia100 was launched at  Rio+20, in the first edition, they guide you through solutions from 56 countries on six continents. From solar power in Sudan, to sustainable fashion in Switzerland; from water-cooling in Canada to solar-cooling in Singapore; from buses in Brazil, to smart buildings in Sydney.

The solutions they present have been organized  into sections for the citizen; the CEO; the advocate; the engineer; the venture capitalist; and the politician. They also clearly say which sector (buildings, food, fashion, etc.) each solution impacts, and how each solution benefits economic, social, and environmental sustainability.

[issuu width=420 height=346 embedBackground=%23000000 backgroundColor=%23222222 documentId=120625132501-355e52f1ae0a4a5d8953f8ad303c3222 name=sustainia100_3 username=sustainia_me tag=rio unit=px v=2]

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Arcole Sustainable Solutions for a Fair Future series continues Thursday

A brief reminder about the next event in the Sustainable Solutions for a Fair Future series.

Join us this Thursday from 6pm, as Charlotte Webster from Solar Century will be discussing the global potential of solar power, including macro and micro uses; barriers to uptake and new policies, and the UK story of solar power. We’ll discuss what’s happening on the ground and what individuals can do.

Founded in 1998, Solar Century is the UK’s largest independent solar energy company and has delivered a number of high profile projects including the Eden Project, the CIS Tower and the Big Brother House. Solar Century is working on the largest solar housing project with 650 homes in South Yorkshire powered by solar electricity by 2012.

Cycle Sunday organised in partnership with Artsadmin, will take place on 12 June. It will be a jam-packed day with events, discussions, workshops and artistic interventions all about bikes and cycling. Click HERE for more information

Solar One Gives Presentation at ecoartspace NYC

On Saturday, April 25th at 6:30 join ecoartspace in NYC to hear the “I Heart PV” presentation by Christopher Neidl from Solar One. Christopher will give an overview of why solar photovolatics (PV) are a good fit for NYC and the types of policies that the state and city can pursue in order to grow solar’s contribution to our energy mix over time.

Launched by Solar One in 2008, “I Heart PV” is a people powered campaign that mobilizes citizen support for pro-solar policies and educates New Yorkers about the potential and benefits of solar power here in the five boroughs.

The Habitat for Artists project will continue this summer at Solar One’s City Sol Festival at Stuyvesant Cove Park at 23rd Street and the East River, stay tuned for more info.

Saturday April 25th at 6:30 pm at ecoartspace, 53 Mercer Street, 3rd Fl. NYC
SEATING IS LIMITED – PLEASE RSVP!
amy@ecoartspace.org

Go to EcoArtSpace

Earth Hour and the curious effect of candlelight

This Saturday from 8.30pm to 9.30pm is Earth Hour.  All over the world people will switch off their lights for sixty minutes. Public institutions worldwide will go dark. Myself, I’m going round to my friend Paul’s house where we will eat dinner in candlelight. Paul has to take part, of course; he works for the WWF who are behind the whole concept that draws 2,700 towns and cities, 20,000 businesses and millions of people in 84 countries around the world together for an hour.  It’s part symbolic gesture, and partly a way of engaging us all in the idea of using less. Of course the idea of being thrilled at the prospect of using less for an hour could have very middle-class, Presbyterian tang to it. Using less is possibly not quite as exotic to the billions worldwide for whom electricity is a historically recent miracle.

But it’s worth doing for another reason too; there is something fabulous about darkness, something that is easy to lose touch with if you’ve grown up with the idea of electricity being cheap and plentiful. Using less doesn’t have to be a hair-shirt thing.

I was reminded of this last year when I went off-grid for a month with my kids in Devon, using only solar power, paraffin lamps and candles for light. I wrote a piece about it for The Observer:

While I wait for the water to boil I fill the lamps with paraffin; the shack is lit by candles and oil lamps. Snow starts to pelt down outside. I wonder if I’m underprepared.

After eating, we get out a board game; the kids crowd round the table. Despite the icy cold outside, the shack is suddenly lusciously warm.

A red glow seeps from the stove. Our faces are pink in the paraffin light.

Electricitylessness is an astonishing novelty in the modern age. My daughter’s friend says: ‘I keep reaching round the doors expecting to find a light switch.’ Instead, they carry torches or candles to light their way. ‘It’s fun lighting candles,’ says Tomas with a dangerous glint in his eye. I remind him that this building is made of wood.

Electricity fills every corner of a house with light. In contrast, the paraffin lamps on the table light only our faces; it has the miraculous effect of drawing people together into a close, sociable circle. It’s like being in a 17th-century Dutch painting. I am suddenly reminded of the joy of being a boy during the power blackouts of the Seventies.

I step outside. In an exceptionally starry frost, I look in through the windows at the children playing contentedly at the table and feel curiously proud of having provided for them, in a hunter-gatherer-type way. It’s a sentiment that doesn’t strike me much at home.

Image: The Matchmaker by Gerrit van Honthorst (1592-1656)

EDIT:

As viral campaigns go, this one is kind of genius, and shares Caravaggio-type lightint with the painting above. Warning. Won’t watch it if you’re squeamish. Contains grauitous violence.

 

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology