Ongoing Project

Water: Traditional Knowledge

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Recognising the value of Traditional Knowledge is an ongoing project.  The United Nations University’s Institute of Advanced Studies Traditional Knowledge Project contributed to the 5th World Water Forum in 2009.  The proceedings published on their web site give a hint of the depth of this area.

There are various reports bringing traditional knowledge to bear on national and international water policy, including Northern Voices, Northern Waters from the North West Territories, the Anishinabek Report from Ontario and A Policy Statement on North Australian Indigenous Water Rights.

What is striking about all of these documents is that the meaning of water rights is deeply embedded in beliefs, cultural histories and traditional knowledge, but that the recommendations are framed in the modern management language of leadership, recommendations and executive summaries.  This ability to frame critical issues with respect and also with impact is a particular strength of the voice of indigenous peoples: Gavin Renwick relates that the Elders talk about the need to be “strong like two people” meaning to be strong in the western culture, and also strong in the traditional culture.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

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Toby Smith Exhibition | theprintspace blog

During the harsh winter of 2010 Toby Smith spent three months in the Scottish Highlands beginning an ongoing project to document the renewable energy industry.

Above ground Smith captured dramatic panoramas, vast arctic-like scenery and alluring night images lit by the moon and stars. Below ground he explored hidden underground tunnels, engineering marvels and colossal turbine halls.

Now, for the first time, Smith exhibits a selection of his images from the initial phase of ‘The Renewables Project’ which celebrates the union of striking landscapes and sustainable energy structures.

Exhibition Opening Thursday Night! | theprintspace blog.

Fallen Fruit: SHOW US HOW YOU EAT

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1EVMWpO8VA

Fallen Fruit introduces Show Us How You Eat, a participatory online video project, 2010, and is seeking your videos of eating, up to 60 seconds in length.

Though there are endless images of food in art, and even still images of food in peoples mouths, we realize there is very little documentation of people actually eating. In Show Us How You Eat we solicit participants around the world on YouTube to send us one-minute clips of them eating not preparing, cutting, or cooking, but actually eating, chewing and swallowing food. These clips are combined into an endless stream of smiling mastication, a meditation on the act of eating that connects each and every one of us.

A selection of the videos submitted to Show Us How You Eat will be included in an exhibition, Fallen Fruit Presents The Fruit of LACMA (June 27-November 7, 2010), as part of EATLACMA, a year-long investigation into food, art, culture and politics.

HOW TO ENTER

Contact information: In order for your work to be considered please include your name and e-mail address with your entry.

Deadline: This is an ongoing project, but in order to be considered for inclusion in the Fallen Fruit Presents the Fruits of LACMA exhibition, submit your entry before May 31.

MORE INFO HERE: YouTube – SHOW US HOW YOU EAT.

Lima and LA


Although Los Angeles is not quite the desert that Lima, Peru is, this event at the MAK center in Hollywood still looks interesting. More at www.makcenter.org

THE MAK URBAN FUTURE INITIATIVE (UFI) PUBLIC FORUM SERIES PRESENTS:

Los Angeles + Lima: Probing the Urban Desert
A conversation between UFI Fellow Alexia Leon and Christian Stayner

For the MAK UFI Public Forum, Leon and Stayner discuss their ongoing project on the “urban desert” (developed in collaboration with Peruvian art curator Jorge Villacorta). Leon and Stayner shall critically consider the role of the architect in shaping the future development of arid lands. They will also present their observations on the points of intersection between Lima and Los Angeles, both places that have sprung up from the desert. Leon and Stayner’s subject will take them into issues of urban settlement, population density, social transformation, and the use of history by architects and urban planners.

Tuesday, April 7
Reception at 6:30 pm
Presentation at 7:00 pm, followed by Q & A

MAK Center for Art and Architecture, L.A.

Schindler House
835 North Kings Road
West Hollywood, CA 90069

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