Npo

Julie’s Bicycle Webinar Series

JBsustainingcreativity.102840

This content is reposted from Julie’s Bicycle

In January 2012, Arts Council England made environmental reporting a funding obligation for all major revenue funded programmes (Bridge, Npo’s, Mpm’s and Mdp’s). To comply, organisations must complete an environmental policy and action plan, and report their water and energy by creating an IG Tool entry.

The first annual reporting deadline is May 31st 2013. To meet it, the reporting process must be started now.

Julie’s Bicycle are running a series of webinars to help organisations report.

Webinars are free but you must register to attend. You may attend any number of webinars.

Those organisations or individuals new to environmental reporting are advised to start with Module 1. Those with more experience may wish to begin at Module 2 or 3. Some webinars will be run multiple times to give everyone a chance to attend.

We are in the process of subtitling the webinars and improving other aspects of accessibility. In the mean time please do not hesitate to get in touch with us if you have any specific needs.

Module 1 – An Introduction

1.1. Environmental Reporting: what is it, how does it affect you and why is it important?

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes. It is for the staff tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan, and submitting energy and water data through the Julie’s Bicycle IG Tools.

Aim: This webinar will provide an introduction and overview of the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements. It will explain the necessary steps to comply and the help on offer.

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Why is this happening now?
  • How does it affect you?
  • What are the benefits for your organisation?
  • What help is available?
  • What is an environmental policy and action plan?
  • What are the IG Tools?
  • Q&A

Dates: March 13th 10am – 11am | March 27th 10am – 11am

Register to attend

Module 2 – Basic Training

2.1. How to Create your Environmental Policy and Action Plan – Environmental Reporting for Creative Organisations

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes. It is for the staff tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan, and submitting energy and water data through the Julie’s Bicycle IG Tools.

Before attending this webinar you should begin developing your policy and action plan in line with our guidance. 

Aim: This webinar will take you through the process of creating an environmental policy and action plan in line with the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements.

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle – what is expected of you.
  • What is an environmental policy and action plan?
  • How can they benefit your organisation?
  • Top tips for creating an environmental policy and action plan.
  • What help is available?
  • Trouble shooting Q&A – your chance to ask the experts about any problems you are having with the environmental reporting process.

Dates: March 20th 10am – 11am | April 10th 10am – 11am | April 24th 11am – 12pm | May 1st 10am – 11am

Register to attend

2.2. How to Use the IG Tools – Environmental Reporting for Creative Organisations

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes. It is for the staff tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan, and submitting energy and water data through the Julie’s Bicycle IG Tools.

Before attending this webinar you should have created an IG Tool account.

Aim: This webinar will take you through the process of using the IG Tools in line with the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements.

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • What are the IG Tools?
  • How can they benefit your organisation?
  • Collecting data – how to ensure you have the information you need in the correct format.
  • Creating your first IG Tool entry – step by step.
  • Trouble shooting Q&A – your chance to ask the experts about any problems you are having with the environmental reporting process.

Dates: March 6th 10am – 11am | April 10th 11am – 12am | April 17th 11am – 12am | May 1st 11am – 12am

Register to attend

Module 3 – Specialist Advice

3.1. Small is Beautiful – Specialist Advice on Environmental Reporting for Organisations with Five Employees or Less

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes with five employees or less. It is for operational staff tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan, and completing an IG Tool entry.

Before attending this webinar you must have registered an IG Tool account and begun work on your environmental policy and action plan.

Aim: This webinar provides practical guidance for organisations with five employees or less on complying with the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements.

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • What you need to focus on as a small organization.
  • Using the IG Tools as a small organisation – where the benefits lie.
  • Creating an environmental policy and action plan for a small organisation – focusing on what counts and amplifying your efforts.
  • Industry case study.
  • Trouble shooting Q&A – your chance to ask the experts about any problems you are having with the environmental reporting process.

Dates: May 8th 11am – 12am

Register to attend

3.2. Planning, Engaging and Acting – Specialist Advice on Environmental Reporting Organisations with 100 Employees or More

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes with 100 staff or more. It is for operational staff tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan and completing an IG Tool entry.

Before attending this webinar you must have registered an IG Tool account and begun work on your environmental policy and action plan.

Aim: This webinar provides practical guidance for organisations with 100 employees or more on complying with the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements. 

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Setting the scope: realistic targets and recruiting help from across your organisation.
  • Using the IG Tools as a large organisation – dealing with large amounts of data.
  • Creating an environmental policy and action plan for a large organisation – creating useful tools for use throughout your organisation.
  • Industry case study.
  • Trouble shooting Q&A – your chance to ask the experts about any problems you are having with the environmental reporting process.

Dates: April 17th 10am – 11am | May 15th 11am – 12pm

Register to attend

3.3. Finding Opportunities in Complexity – Specialist Advice on Environmental Reporting for Mpm’s and Large Multi Venue/Activity Organisations

This webinar is for large Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes with multiple venues and/or activities, including arts festivals. It is for operational staff  tasked with creating an environmental policy and action plan, and completing an IG Tool entry.

Before attending this webinar you must have registered an IG Tool account and begun work on your environmental policy and action plan.

Aim: This webinar provides practical guidance for Mpm’s and other large multi venue or multi event organisations on complying with the Arts Council’s environmental reporting requirements. 

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Setting the scope: how to manage large estates and complex reporting structures to fulfill requirements.
  • Focus on the IG Tools: how to collect data and create an account for multiple activities, accounts and entries.
  • Focus and prioritisation – environmental policies and action plans for complex, multi activity organisations.
  • Industry case study.
  • Trouble shooting Q&A – your chance to ask the experts about any problems you are having with the environmental reporting process.

Dates: April 24th 10am – 11pm

Register to attend

Module 4 – Taking it Further

4.1. Changing Light Bulbs or Changing Minds? The Case for Sustainability and Future Proofing of the Arts

This webinar is for heads of Arts Council England’s Major Revenue Funded Programmes.

Aim: This webinar explores the issues and implications of Arts Council England’s environmental reporting requirements and builds the case for cultural leadership on sustainability.

The webinar will include:

  • Opening address by Alison Tickell, CEO of Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Key note and discussion from leading voices within the creative industries.
  • Q&A.

Dates: April 3rd 10am – 11am

Register to attend

4.2. Learning from Experience: Case Studies of Organisations who are leading on sustaianbility

The webinar will include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Speakers from creative organisations leading on sustainability. Challenges faced, opportunities found and practical examples to learn from.

Dates: May 8th 10am – 11am | May 15th 10am – 11am

Register to attend

If you have any suggestions for organisations you would like to see feature in this webinar, or topics you would like covered then please let us know atsupport@juliesbicycle.com

4.3. Big ambitions for year two – What are the opportunities beyond the May 31st reporting deadline?

This webinar is for Arts Council England’s major revenue funded programmes. It is for all employees of Npo’s and Mpm’s already making progress on sustainability.

Aim: This webinar demonstrates the organisational, financial and reputational benefits of a continued commitment to sustainability.

This webinar wil include:

  • Introduction to the Arts Council’s environmental reporting and Julie’s Bicycle.
  • Sustainability benefits beyond the scope of the Arts Council reporting.
  • Communicating sustainability.
  • Measuring touring impacts.
  • Why measure audience and business travel?
  • How to be a leader on sustainability.
  • Q&A.

Dates: May 22nd 12pm – 1pm

Register to attend

4.4. Arts Council England’s Environmental Reporting 2013: Troubleshooting

Environmental experts Julie’s Bicycle host an open troubleshooting clinic on Arts Council England’s new environmental reporting requirement for Npo’s and Mpm’s. Please send any specific questions in advance to support@juliesbicycle.com.

Dates: May 22nd 10am – 12pm

Register to attend

If you have any questions regarding the webinars please email ussupport@juliesbicycle.com 

ecoartspace joins Destination Schuylkill River at the Manayunk Eco Art Fest


Recently I’ve been traveling back and forth to Philadelphia working with five artists who are installing temporary public art projects along the Manayunk Canal in Philadelphia. These projects open on September 25th and 26th in conjunction with Destination Schuylkill River and the Manayunk Eco Arts Festival. Destination Schuylkill River is a NPO whose mission is to celebrate life along the river and to connect communities to the river through planning, programming and projects. The weekend event brings together artists, crafters, green businesses, and ecologically-concerned community groups to share resources and education about green and healthy living and will be a celebration of artistic, sustainable, and local green initiatives. Manayunk is located a few miles west of Center City, Philadelphia.


The Manayunk Canal is part of the Schuylkill River Trail and is designated as a National Historic District. Once a navigable waterway for industrial cargo, the Canal was completed in 1818 and runs for several miles adjacent to banks of the Schuylkill. The river ends its 128-mile journey in Philadelphia, passing through East Falls and Manayunk before emptying into the Delaware. A recently restored towpath on the banks of the canal is the site for five artist’s projects that address issues of sustainability.

For some background history of the site – in papers dated 1686 between William Penn and the Lenni-Lenape, the Lenape referred to the Schuylkill River as “Manaiung”, their word for river, which literally translates as “place to drink”. As fate would have it, this once industrial mill town has become a trendy bar and restaurant destination.Early settlers farmed the land above the hills of Manayunk, and the abundance of natural resources and the Industrial Revolution spurred development of the community. Along the Schuylkill mills sprung up with products as varied as cloth, paper, gunpowder, lumber, milled wheat and corn, and pressed oil from flax. The Schuylkill Navigation Company Canal provided power to the mills along the river and allowed coal to be transported to the steam engines of Philadelphia from a hundred miles upstream. The original towpath was the path used by mules as they pulled canal boats carrying coal and passengers through the water. As a part of Pennsylvania’s earliest slackwater canal system, the original navigation system was a 108-mile series of dams, locks, slackwater and canal segments created to bring coal from Schuylkill County to Philadelphia.


Today, the Canal is no longer in use for industry, most of the mills have closed and the city has eventual plans to open the locks and revitalize the water system.The original mule path has been restored for pedestrians and bicyclers to become part of a river greenway system that stretches for miles. Destination Schuylkill with funding from the William Penn foundation asked ecoartspace to invite several artists to create temporary site-specific works along the canal for the festival.


Wisconsin based artist Roy Staab spent over two weeks working at the site. First he carefully selected the best location along the Canal where his ephemeral sculpture would be most visible, while at the same time protected from strong winds. He chose to work between two trees whose branches overhang the water, and in between two bridges so that visitors would have different perspectives for viewing the work. He then set out to find wild plants nearby that he harvests in order to create the lines to make his sculpture. He used invasives such as Japanese Knotweed and Purple Loosestrife which were both flowering and actually quite beautiful, (though no one wants these invasive and fast spreading plants – so it was great that he could make use of them.) Roy also used Goldenrod and other native plants. He then created 4 long lines using a weaving and knotting procedure with biodegradable sisal rope. The lines measure approximately 180 ft long in length and suspend 20 ft from the trees. He titled the work, “Suspended Between the Living and the Dead” referring to the two trees being used as his support. Roy mostly worked alone but he had a few college interns and great support from Destination Schuylkill and the Manayunk Development Corporation staff, in particular, board member Garrett Elwood spent a lot of time on the water. Roy entertained neighbors in the community and got a lot of attention, both positive and negative (local fisherman were not happy). However, mostly the town appreciated having a world traveler like Roy working in their midst. He has created ephemeral installations such as this one around the world for the past 30 years in the U.S., Europe, South America and Asia. His works may last days or a couple of weeks, or months depending on weather and the forces of nature.


Chrysanne Stathacos has traveled to Philadelphia from Toronto to create an 8ft wooden flower poem which she plans to float on the Manayunk Canal. For the past several weeks she has been researching water plants such as Lilies and Lotus Flowers to determine which plants will be best to tag a ride in her floating sculpture, which spells the word PURIFY. She chose this word as a reminder of the importance of wetlands and clean water, and that we can all do our part to help heal the environment. Chrysanne is a multi-media artist whose artistic concerns intersect with spirituality and a communion with the natural world. Her art is influenced by Eastern and Western traditions and she works to connect indigenous ritual to contemporary art.


Habitat for Artists is a Hudson Valley-based collaborative group initiated by artist Simon Draper in 2008. ecoartspace has worked with HFA on several previous projects including last summer in the exhibition Down to Earth at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education. One of HFA’s studio/shed structures will be located in a park in between the Canal and Main St. Parts of this shed were previously used at SCEE, so they have a small travel footprint. The sheds are comprised of recycled material, old lumber, windows and doors and are used by artists as studio spaces (each only six by six feet) both inside and out to examine how they might redefine their creative space, needs and process. The Manayunk HFA shed will be open during the Festival, artists Simon Draper, Todd Sargood and others will be on site for visitors to engage with and participate in the making of art.


Women’s Work by NYC performance artist Chere Krakovsky will be an extension of her recent Clothesline performance held at Solar One, overlooking NYC’s East River. This will be her third performance piece in Philadelphia, following her 2008 work, The Neighbors Next Door at International House at UPenn. All of Chere’s works are situated where the everyday

and the creative co-exist. She will wash her clothes and hang a clothesline along the Manayunk Canal to address issues of energy conservation, domesticity and traditional women’s work. Looking back to her own grandmother, Chere reminds of a not too distant past where wind and sun power were harnessed to dry the laundry. The work asks us to reflect on our over-consumption of energy in a time of economic decline. Chere has invited the community to participate by bringing an item of clothing that will be hung on the clothesline.


RAIR (Recycled Artist-In-Residency) is an exciting, new non-profit in Philadelphia located within a construction and industrial materials recycling facility. Initiated by Fern Gookin, a recent graduate from Philadelphia University’s Sustainable Design Program, RAIR’s mission is to create awareness about environmental issues by encouraging creative ways to divert waste from landfills. RAIR works to bring art and sustainability together through an artist-in-residency program. RAIR currently has two artists piloting the program, Billy Blaise Dufala and Machele Nettles, and they will be located on Main Street exhibiting their works and hosting a kids art making project.


The Manayunk Eco Arts Festival is a joint effort of the Manayunk Development Corporation and Destination Schuylkill River funded by the William Penn Foundation.



Images top to bottom:

Historical Canal photograph, 1918

Roy Staab, Suspended Between the Living and the Dead

Chrysanne Stathacos, Purify (work in progress)

Habitat for Artists at Schuylkill Center

Chere Krakovsky, Clothesline at Solar One

RAIR, Billy Blaise Dufala, Tricycle

Go to EcoArtSpace