Masters Degree

Landscape Dissertation/Project Prizes

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Tim Collins highlighted that nominations are invited by the Landscape Research Group for PhD, Masters and Undergraduate dissertations and projects.

The deadline for submissions:

  • Undergraduate prizes is 15 September 2012,
  • MA and PhD prizes are both 15 November 2012.
  • Announcement will be made by 30 May 2013.

See below for further details:

Landscape Research Group is an interdisciplinary organisation the members of which include academics and practitioners from a range of disciplines including geography, landscape design, landscape architecture and planning. The Group publishes the scholarly journal Landscape Research. Part of the Group’s remit is to encourage innovative research on landscape related issues amongst students.

To this end we now have three Doctoral degree prizes, three prizes for Masters dissertations or projects and three prizes for undergraduate dissertations. The prizes are available to students who have completed a PhD, Masters degree or undergraduate degree and have produced a dissertation and/or project in a subject area with a landscape focus in the year Oct 2011 – Oct 2012.

We have also established a new online prize environment that asks course directors and research degree coordinators to register and nominate students online. If you are interested in doing so, please send me an email with your name, your academic title, as well as university address, email and phone number to awards@landscaperesearch.org. You will be enrolled on our system and able to nominate students directly. Once nominated students will receive an email with instruction to upload their thesis and supporting appendices to be considered for a prize. [http://www.landscaperesearch.org/student_section] .

Landscape Research Group Prizes

    • Up to three Doctoral Prizes at £500 for original contributions to knowledge
    • Up to three Masters Prizes at £350 for significant academic and creative inquiry
    • Up to three Undergraduate Prizes at £250 each for rigorous analysis and output

We make our prizes in a broad range of fields as befitting the landscape topic. We request that course leaders or doctoral programme coordinators make their nomination in one of three categories, also identifying the academic area (to the subject level) in your school that provided the academic setting and primary academic support for the degree.

Our categories include:

    • Humanities: Including cultural geography, history, archaeology, literature or philosophy.
    • Science, Planning and Management: material geography, environmental management, material geography, planning, and science.
    • Art and Design: architecture, art, design and landscape architecture.

For further information see the Landscape Research Group website.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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ESRC-Scottish Government/ Forestry Commission Scotland PhD Studentship

All the Trees (detail), Chris Fremantle, 2010

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Applications are sought from suitably qualified candidates for a joint ESRC-Scottish Government PhD three-year (‘+3′) studentship. The project entitled ‘Designing and Managing Forests for Health’ has been developed in collaboration with the Forestry Commission Scotland and seeks to examine the links between forestry and community health across Scotland.

The successful candidate will be based in the Centre for Research on Environment, Society and Health (CRESH) in the School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh. They will also be active members of the university’s OPENspace Research Centre and the Human Geography Research Group.

Applications will be particularly welcome from candidates with a social science / environmental background (e.g. geography, landscape architecture, sociology, environmental science), and quantitative methods will be emphasised in project and training plans. Applicants must have a Masters degree or equivalent in an appropriate field. A working knowledge in GIS would be advantageous.

Start Date: September 2012

Further details on the project and information on how to apply can be found here.

http://cresh.org.uk/esrc-scottish-government-forestry-commission-scotland-studentship/

The deadline for submission is 27th April 2012. Interviews will take place during May 2012.

Applicants may discuss the project with any member of the supervisory team: Prof. Jamie Pearce (jamie.pearce@ed.ac.uk), Prof. Catharine Ward Thompson (c.ward-thompson@ed.ac.uk) or Dr Niamh Shortt (niamh.shortt@ed.ac.uk).

The first supervisor is Jamie Pearce, Professor of Health Geography, Institute of Geography, School of GeoSciences University of Edinburgh, Drummond Street Edinburgh EH8 9XP

Tel: + 44 131 650 2294

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Economical and Eco-Friendly Clothing Art

The tagline of creative collective Sewing Rebellion is “Stop Shopping, Start Sewing!” Founded by Carol Lung-Bazile, AKA FrauFiber, in 2006, this eclectic group of men and women sew to save money and impact the way Americans think about clothing and garment production. The nearly lost arts of mending and reusing clothing are explored twice monthly in Brooklyn. New chapters of this organization are popping up all over the United States, encouraging thousands of men and women to become sewing-empowered. Many international chapters have opened, bridging differences in culture and economics to bring people together around the sewing machine.

The main aim of Sewing Rebellion is to provide individuals with the skills necessary to fix clothing and create exciting new garments out of articles that would otherwise go to waste. In fact, cutting down on consumer waste is one of the stated goals of the NYC Chapter of Sewing Rebellion. Every year, millions of used clothing items are thrown away or sit in closets and thrift shops, gathering dust. It doesn’t take a masters degree in sustainability to see that these items contribute to landfill overcrowding and encourage garment manufacturers to continue producing cheap, expendable clothing. The garment industry is notorious for exploitation and the widespread use of sweatshop labor.

Sewing Rebellion members hope that encouraging consumers to fix worn or broken items will help cut down on demand for poorly-constructed articles. In turn, they hope a decrease in demand for cheap, new clothing would force manufacturers to pay their employees living wages in return for constructing high-quality, durable garments.

Recent press about the Sewing Rebellion movement has highlighted how the group helps consumers save money and teaches fun, essential sewing skills. Ranging from instruction on darning socks and replacing buttons to repairing zippers and refitting dresses, group meetings offer something for sewers and aspirants of all levels. A recent article in the Washington Post highlights the economic and environmental advantages associated with learning how to repair clothing. Repairing pockets, replacing buttons, and sewing busted seams helps consumers extend the life of their clothing. Replacing fewer items means spending less money. This is a fun form of frugality that is well-suited to tough economic times.

Sewing Rebellion chapters also encourage members to seize upon and express their own unique sense of style. Millions of Americans buy the exact same shirts, jeans, skirts and outerwear from the same stores every year. It is difficult to look unique in a clothing market saturated with cheap items that are similar in quality and appearance. Reusing and repurposing old garments is a wonderful way for individuals to recycle waste and to express their own taste. Garment swaps sponsored by the group encourage individuals to take advantage of the old maxim that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

Frau Fiber’s movement has caught fire as a fun and stylish way to save money and reduce waste. Economic struggles have encouraged many individuals to find creative ways to protect their pocketbooks and to get the best value out of the things that they own. Sewing Rebellion is a collective of women and men who embrace the ethos of frugality while promoting creativity and style awareness. The less you shop and the more you sew, the more you save. The logic underlying Sewing Rebellion is beautifully simple.