Man And Nature

ECOISMI 2013

12 - Dada d'Adda - Susanna BattinSunday, June 2 inaugurated Ecoismi, 2013, an international event for contemporary art in the heart of the Natural Park of the Island Borromeo in Cassano d’Adda, Province of Milan.

Ecoismi is a public art project that reflects on the processes and transformations that relate to the territory, the environment and present condition to trigger a reflection on the dynamics of ecological and sustainable.

Through the language of contemporary art, artists, architects and designers were invited to confront the issue of balance between man and nature. During the period of residence – work in progress they have created a multisensory path consisting of twelve site-specific installations realized n the area of the Natural Park.

The event, this year at its second edition, is curated by Ylbert Durishti and young artists, selected through a call, come from all over the world. They are: TheFleetGroup (Tbilisi, Georgia), AtelierFraSe (London, England), Päivi Raivio (Helsinki, Finland), Grace Zanotto (Milan, Italy), Matteo Rota (Casirate d’Adda, Italy), Julia Jamrozik (Basel, Switzerland) , Ada Kobusiewicz (Petrovaradin, Serbia), Chiara Sgaramella (Valencia, Spain), Diana Franceschin (Milan, Italy), Giacomo Zaganelli (Berlin, Germany), Selene Volpi (Senatobia, Italy), Susanna Battin (Los Angeles, USA).

Each of them has developed the themes of the project according to its own specific declination, in a variety of shades ranging from the question of energy savings that of climate change,from the action of man on the environment to the disappearance of some species.

All artworks are made with natural materials, recycled or recovered. The artists have based their poetry on the reuse of waste materials were reinserted in a cycle that brings them back to life, where nature and art have the opportunity to renew their reciprocal myth.

ARTWORKS

Radici (Roots) by AtelierFraSe (Francesco Gorni and Serena Montesissa) is an architectural intervention to “experience” the trees as living organisms, through the creation of wood niches in which visitors take their seats. Again in wood is made by The fleet Group (Vasili Macharadze and Bessa Kartlelishvili), the sculptural work Mesh, in which the two authors report an object, the foot into the wild after being initially converted into trigonometric language.

Blackout project by Ada Kobusiewicz introduces us to the theme of ongoing climate change on our planet and invites to reflect on the question of energy savings. Also Arca (Ark) by Chiara Sgaramella is focused on raising public awareness, her work aims to celebrate biodiversity by building an ark.

The intention of Grace Zanotto with Lux Flower, a photo-luminescent flower that opens to the sun, is to create an installation that speaks of art as a possibility for dialogue between the species that live on Earth, to renegotiate the rights of all living beings.

The geometry is deeply connected to both Ramificioconnessioni by Matteo Rota – which reconstructs the vascular branching of the leaves and branches of trees tie in the three spatial dimensions through the figure of the cube – and the project Kreuzungen by Giacomo Zaganelli who wants to pay homage to the relationship between man-nature representing the contemporary environment through a large installation by floral appearance, made with linen thread.

The work Un mondo sommerso (A submerged world) by Diana Franceschin want to flip up and down and the elements earth, air and water, immersing the viewer in a hypothetical dip in the middle of a group of fish. While Skyfield, by Julia Jamrozik, is based on the idea of capturing the ephemeral and changing nature of heaven, and bring it to the ground, providing a new context for its remark.

Päivi Raivio is the author of Unwind, an installation that uses the element of the wind, is composed of aeolian harps, forming a corridor 20 meters long. The project of Selene Volpi concerns sound research of natural elements, Scatole sonore (Boxes Sheet) is an artwork composed by a collection of sculptures that play with the action of the wind.

The project Dada d’Adda di Susanna Battin, is found in many parts of the park and is in direct connection with either observation of the territory of the island and with eleven works realized by other artists.

The objective of Ecoismi is indeed to activate a process of raising awareness of environmental issues by introducing principles of “urban ecology”. It also aims to bring contemporary art to diverse audiences by implementing a model of creative enhancement of externalities of the territory.

The exhibition is open every day until 22 September. Admission is free.

More Info: www.ecoismi.org or www.comune.cassanodadda.mi.it

Representing the Natural World

by Ian Garrett

Published in the Winter edition of the CSPA Quarterly, which was focused on the 2009 United Nations Conference of the Parties in Copenhagen.  To view or order back issues, visit http://magcloud.com/browse/Magazine/38626.  To subscribe to the CSPA QUARTERLY, join us! http://www.sustainablepractice.org/join-the-cspa/

While political demonstrations traditionally pit two opposing ideologies against each other–think World Trade Organization meetings and anti-globalization activism–the demonstrations and activities around the 15th annual Conference of the Partners (COP15) were surprisingly complimentary to the talks themselves. The grassroots activists were not opposed to the political maneuverings, but rather wanted to see them go farther. This “will to move forward” allowed for creativity in demonstrations and amplified artistic activism. Curation at local museums and art sites took advantage of the agreed-upon topics of COP15, setting programming well in advance. The more guerilla forces of the art world seized the collective momentum, and artistic presentation during the two-weeks of the climate summit spanned from museum gallery to street happening. While the politicians represented their national agenda, the artists represented the natural world.

HISTORICAL REPRESENTATION

The Nation Gallery of Denmark laid the ground work for understanding the environment through artistic representation with their exhibition “Nature Strikes Back: Man and Nature in Western Art”. The aggressive titling is meant to communicate the show’s theme of man seeking dominance over nature. It focuses on how nature in art is rarely a direct representation, but a symbol for itself and man’s relationship to it. This relationship is articulated through five themes:  Exploitation, Human Nature, Order and Systems, Landscape and Disaster.

Within the exhibition, “Nature Strikes Back” offers a picture of nature that highlights a clear separation between man and the natural world. A significant point is made to articulate the significance of the landscape conceptually. Having not  appeared in European language until the late 16th Century, the word ‘landscape’ has a loaded history of invoking ownership of that which is depicted. This exhibition also clearly addresses the issues of where the border between our inner and outer natures lie, our sense of the idyllic and edenic paradise, as well as our attempts to organize. The story here is one of control and mastery of the physical world and its latter-day break down. The strike which is being made in return is one that equates judgement day to severe climate changes as retaliation against our enclosure and exploitation. This conclusion keeps man at the center of the issue though, which is problematic. It continues to define nature as a logical system to which we stand opposed and from which we will see active retaliation against our harmful activities, missing the mark on man’s inclusion within natural systems.

“Nature Strikes Back”, and its importance, is clearest when its relationship to another exhibition called “Rethink: Contemporary Art and Climate Change” is considered. “Rethink” is an extensive exhibition of installations displayed across four institutions in three spaces and the virtual world. This exhibition was also divided thematically, though perhaps more opaquely by its titles: Rethink Relations at the National Gallery of Denmark, Rethink The Implicit at the Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Rethink Kakotopia at the Nikolaj Contemporary Art Center, and Rethink Information, which was on the Internet at a satellite exhibition at the Moesgård Museum (in Århus) and as public performance throughout Copenhagen.

Man at the center of natural representation, as found in a traditional gallery format, provides the historical background of “Rethink” both in the sense of nature in art and traditions in presentation. This exhibition of contemporary pieces focuses primarily on generative and phenomenological work, with many articulating systems through demonstration and/or dramatization instead of classification. Programmed into a heavily ambulatory, semi-public space, without a fee, dynamically connected to its other locations through virtual space, “Rethink” is not just contemporary work, but contemporary presentation. The work not only speaks to being connected to natural systems like in Thomas Saraceno’s “Biospheres” and Olafur Eliasson’s “Your Watercolor Machine”, but is placed in shared open space diminishing barriers to access and the creation of connection to the work.

Together, these exhibitions, including the other locations of “Rethink”, serve as a history and foundation for looking at other artistic endeavors in Copenhagen. Individually they look at representations of our understanding of the natural work. “Nature Strikes Back” represents it as something to be classified and contained, while “Rethink” represents it as something to be experienced and studied. Paired, they reflect what has changed in our perceptions over time. And, while they inform one another, they inform the less mainstream exhibitions outside of curated space even more.

REPRESENTING THE PRESENT

Millennium Art’s “CO2 Cube”, featured in this issue of the quarterly, uses a methodology befitting inclusion in “Rethink”. It is a 27 square foot cube, reflecting the volume of one ton of carbon dioxide, and floated in the lake adjacent to the Tycho Brahe Planetarium. It features current data and video about climate change, pulled from the internet that day, streaming across its two faces which are closest to shore. While its form articulates a natural relationship of man in the contemporary world (this volume of CO2 is what the average american produces in two weeks), the media reflected on its service aims for immediacy even with the lag created by the curatorial impact of the projects relationships with the United Nations, Google and YouTube.

One can also look at the example of “7 Meters”, also featured in this issue. It is a project that’s primary visual impact was in the plentiful flashing red LEDs mounted at seven meters above the ground to reflect the anticipated sea level rise should the ice of Greenland melt. Using projected data, it creates an expansive experience throughout Copenhagen, representing the ghost of climates future by tracing a drastic change in the immediate surroundings. And there is also Mark Coreth’s “Polar Ice Bear”, a polar bear skeleton embedded within an ice sculpture of the same bear, left to melt in public. It     exchanges data for exposure to the elements. While it never completed melting due to sub-zero temperatures later in the conference, it combined a known symbol of climate change (the polar bear) with a phenomena of climate change (melting ice) to produce an effective and connective experience through its thematic representations. Both of these projects connect directly to both their immediate environment and larger environmental issues.

All three of these examples were presented in public, high traffic spaces. They focus on a human relationship by representing our downstream effects, both immediate in the sense of the cube as our CO2 output, and that which is more abstract, as with the Ice Bear’s melt created by ambient temperature (which we have a long term collective effect upon). And so, these factors articulate the next step beyond the exhibitions of “Nature Strikes Back” and “Rethink”. They continue the  narrative of natural interconnection and immediateness and highlight the core difference between those gallery shows. Whereas “Nature Strikes Back” articulates man vs. nature, “Rethink” and these public space exhibits articulate man with nature.

ACTING AS REPRESENTATIVES

The red-suited, fedora wearing Climate Debt Agents (who sing), the similarly attired, but otherwise hued Mr. Green of OxFam, the aliens of Azaaz.org, the awards-night ambiance of the “Fossil of the Day” awards. These costumed, theatrical performances infuse humor and inclusivity into the plain-clothed protesters and demonstrators. In these performative, engaging acts, once can see that the opposite of cataloging nature is taking action on its behalf. These creative, complimentary demonstrations blur protest and performance art, and exist in the realm of happenings.

The Yes Men, artists who practice ‘identity correction’ by appearing as high-powered spokespersons of corporations, were most noted for their series of press releases on Monday, December 14, 2009. Teamed with Thierry Geoffroy, a.k.a The Colonel, and headquartered at Gallery Poulsen, the Yes Men created what was likely the most effective and affective of actions, where this performance/protest integration was most clear. They called into question   Canadian environmental policy through a series of official-seeming statements that were authentic enough to fool news organizations for a number of hours during the day. This temporary hijacking of political identity no longer relies on the representational visual articulations we see in the National Gallery.  Instead this direct, subversive action on the behalf of the natural world–using the authentic voice of the Canadian government–represents nature back to man through advocacy, rather than through symbols.

The New Life Festival, organized by Wooloo.org, did not produce or display art itself, but enabled the hosting and accommodation of visitors in Danish homes. It arranged housing for over 3,000 artists and activists during COP15. This allowed many people who otherwise could not afford to be present to  observe this moment in history. The New Life Festival also addressed perceptions of Denmark’s closed-off society. Primarily documented with guest books meant to help the guests and host families get to know one another, this project has completely forfeited aesthetic representational work, symbolism or synecdoche. Instead it has enabled direct representation, articulating a peopled mass by enabling it to gather.

Along with the ambitious collection of interviews by Open Dialogues, a literary UK collective, the ecological burial contracts from the Danish art group Superflex, and the anti-Coca Cola campaign from the Yes Men, these projects define success through congregation and collective energy in defense of the natural world. Working in the name of art, they give voice to two key entities absent from COP15: planet and people.

REPRESENTING SUCCESS IN REPRESENTATIVE FAILURE

In light of what is widely regarded as the failure of COP15 itself, having been unable to reach a binding agreement politically, there is hope and elements of success to which the arts can speak. Closing the Bella Center to NGOs, and the addition of a second credentialing process (meant to remove non-political dialogue from the meetings), underscores this ‘success’. That decision reflects a perceived threat from those who did not represent a political body’s or a nation’s political interest: the people in support of the natural world itself. This group that threatens the political process is the success of these two weeks in Copenhagen. It is a group from around the globe, from all walks of life, which is made of people that are as varied as the ways a changing climate will affect them, and which is reified by gathering and identifying itself as a mass en masse.