Malina

RIP Beatriz da Costa 1974-2012

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Roger Malina just notified the Yasmin list of the death of Beatriz da Costa after a long and courageous battle with cancer.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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SEAD Call for White Papers on Science Engineering Art and Design Collaboration

SEAD CALL FOR WHITE PAPERS on ISSUES FACING THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY SEEKING to ENHANCE COLLABORATION AMONG THE SCIENCES, ENGINEERING, ARTS and DESIGN

The US National Science Foundation -funded Network for Sciences, Engineering, Arts and Design (SEAD: http://sead.viz.tamu.edu/) is issuing an open International Call for White Papers from the community. The Principal Investigator is Carol LaFayette of Texas A&M University.

We are seeking to survey concerns, roadblocks and opportunities, and solicit recommendations for enhancing collaboration among sciences, engineering, arts and design. These position papers will be submitted as part of a report to NSF and the community from the SEAD network in the summer of 2013. With grateful appreciation for US funding, we recognize that activity connecting the sciences, engineering, arts, and design is international and, furthermore, that global involvements are essential in today’s economy. Therefore we are interested both in what US collaborators can learn from experiences in other countries, and vice versa, and also in how to foster collaborations that bridge beyond regions to nations. Cultural cross-fertilization via the SEAD network – whether from disciplinary, organizational or ethnic perspectives – is a vital component of our purpose and goals.

A SEAD White Paper Steering Committee has been assembled (http://seadnetwork.wordpress.com/sead-white-papers-steering-committee/), co-chaired by Roger Malina (ATEC, UT Dallas and IMERA, Aix Marseille University) and Carol Strohecker (Center for Design Innovation, University of North Carolina system). Submitted White Papers will be reviewed by the steering committee and posted on the open SEAD White Paper Web Site <http://sead.viz.tamu.edu/white_papers.html>. Authors of white papers will be invited to join the SEAD White Paper Working Group.

White Papers must address one significant roadblock or opportunity, in terms of the SEAD focus areas or a relevant topic of the authors’ choosing. SEAD focuses include: research and creative work, learning and education, productive partnerships across disciplines and organizations, and culture and economic development. Although a White Paper may be submitted by a sole author, we encourage collective authorship and group submissions. White Papers must include recommendations for actions to move the community forward. We welcome submission of already existing advocacy papers or reports. White Papers should be short: text up to 10 pages total, including all materials and type size no smaller than 12; video no longer than 10 minutes.

The Deadline for initial one-page Abstracts is August 15, 2012.
Submissions invited on the basis of the Abstracts will be October 15, 2012.

You may submit a White Paper via email to PI Carol LaFayette. If your submission is a video, email the link to its location in an open archive (such as uTube, vimeo, etc.) Note that White Papers in both text and video formats must include explicit recommendations addressed to specific stakeholders.

b) We welcome links to existing reports, which will be added to our compilation of precedent sources internationally <http://seadnetwork.wordpress.com/bibliography/>.

If you wish to be kept informed of the activities of the SEAD network, please email Carol LaFayette.

For further information or questions about White Papers in text or video format, contact Carol Strohecker.

Additional Guidelines for White Papers are available at http://seadnetwork.wordpress.com/2012/06/11/white-paper-guidelines . We welcome innovative ways of using online media to articulate the arguments of the White Papers. If you wish to explore experimental publishing approaches, contact Roger Malina.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1142510, Collaborative Research: EAGER: Network for Science, Engineering, Arts and Design (NSEAD) IIS, Human Centered Computing. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Lovely Weather in Inishowen, Ireland: what is climate art?

This post comes to you from An Arts and Ecology Notebook

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“how does data feel, taste, sound, look, smell?” Roger Malina, Leonardo, keynote speaker, Lovely Weather art and climate change conference, LetterKenny RCC, Nov 2010

I was briefly in Oxford this week and I had a little time to pass so I wandered into one of the oldest Museums of the History  of Science in the world. They had a display of early Islamic scientific instruments, many were for searching and understanding the skies. They were astonishingly beautiful as well as functional and were later adopted and developed through the middle ages and renaissance in Europe. Many instruments made for understanding the heavens were made in metal, some in ivory (couldn’t help thinking they looked like antique iphones as some were a similar shape, colour and size to our recent technology). The  industry and intent to know the world by all methods has long been with us.  I was thinking about this in reference to a recent Lovely Weather Culture and Climate Change conference that I attended in north-west Donegal last November. An excellent 2 day event celebrated the Lovely Weather climate artists residency project; an innovative Per Cent for Art Irish Public Art programme across 5 electoral areas, co-led by the local Donegal County Arts Office and the Letterkenny Regional Culture Centre  and co-curated by Roger Malina and Annick Bureaud of the long established Art & Science publication, LEONARDO/Olats. This was to my knowledge the first substantial culture and climate event in Ireland and the projects were in the main very thought-provoking and detailed (a catalogue of the projects can be obtained from the Donegal Arts Office).

Roger Malina, editor of Leonardo, was the keynote speaker. Roger is also an astronomer and Director of Astronomy Centre in Marseille, France. A point he made in his talk, while referencing his own experience in astronomy which has seen an explosion in technical instrument development, data production, now further accelerating with the sharing of online data networks, is that over the centuries,  scientists no longer use their senses but their instruments  to understand the world. He argued that in reference to climate change, that artists have such an important role… ‘in making science intimate….not just translating science  or making science pretty.’ He spoke of many artists who were attempting to engage with science, from many diverse practices, who were taking scientific data  and using it in their creative practices. He now sees that we are moving from a world of ‘data scarcity to data plenty but today, while we are data rich, we are meaning poor’. He described this as an epistemological (a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge) inversion. I was particularly interested how Roger described that we are in a ‘data flood… but artists can work successfully embedded in data, where data becomes an element (material) to use.” He concluded by asking us, “how does data feel, taste, sound, look, smell?”

There was an excellent example of data embedded centrally in one of the Lovely Weather residencies. Carbon Footprint is a multi-disciplinary work by Canadian born (now settled in Ireland) artist in residence Seema Goel. The piece uses local wool, spinning and knitting as a metaphor to explore climate change, carbon capture, and micro-economies in Inishowen, County Donegal, Ireland. This project worked on many levels – making hurricane data intimate in the creation of knitted items (see the knitted hat above that relates to hurricane weather data), bringing together local people of all ages to use local materials and forgotten skills (a working example of ’social sculpture’), making visible the loss of  previous local industries to global, unsustainable supply chains (while Donegal has a rich history in wool products,  this has almost entirely disappeared and local wool items are surprisingly imported from afar – this a surprise to many Irish in the audience as Donegal is famed for its fibre heritage), and creating a legacy of community craft activities in the region. It’s delightful to think of the climate data discussions, mixing with knitting patterns discussions and cups of tea (it reminded me of the global crochet coral reef project that came to Ireland’s Science gallery that I discussed last year  – both show the huge upsurge in local materials and fibre craft and just a reminder: this is also the international year of craft, as well as forests). The success in this project are the climate conversations made tangible in the community and unlike many ‘climate  and art and science projects that I’ve encountered, the legacy of the project continues:  knitting and spinning workshops continue for every skill level, from people with an interest that want to get started to those who want to share skills. For more information please contact mccartney.ruth@gmail.com

To follow is a guest post by Margaret Mc Laughlin on another of the Lovely Weather residency projects – all about dead zones (Marbh Chrios) off the coast of Ireland – a fantastic audiovisual, data come community sound project.

 

An Arts & Ecology Notebook, by Cathy Fitzgerald, whose work exists as ongoing research and is continually inspired to create short films, photographic documentation, and writings. While she interacts with foresters, scientists, and communities, she aims to create a sense of a personal possibility, responsibility and engagement in her local environment that also connects to global environmental concerns.
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