Landscape Artists

Space is the place

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Landscape in Artists’ Films

14 Jun 2011 – 4 Jul 2011 (Every Tuesday at 18:30)

Glasgow Film Theatre invites you to a four-week course Space is the Place: Landscape in Artists’ Films.

Landscape has long held a fascination for the avant- garde. This course examines how British filmmakers such as William Raban, Chris Welsby, Emily Richardson, Andrew Kötting and Patrick Keiller have gleaned images directly from the landscape of their surroundings and incorporated them creatively into the fabric of their films. Led by Aimee Mollaghan.

The course comprises four illustrated seminars and discussions accompanied by key readings held in the GFT Learning space.

Full details on the course or please pop in to GFT / call box office on 0141 332 6535 to book a place.

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

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Stunning Views of Glaciers Seen From Space | Wired.com

To a geologist, glaciers are among the most exciting features on Earth. Though they seem to creep along at impossibly slow speeds, in geologic time glaciers are relatively fast, powerful landscape artists that can carve out valleys and fjords in just a few thousand years.

Glaciers also provide an environmental record by trapping air bubbles in ice that reveal atmospheric conditions in the past. And because they are very sensitive to climate, growing and advancing when it’s cold and shrinking and retreating when its warm, they can be used as proxies for regional temperatures.

Over geologic time, they have ebbed and flowed with natural climate cycles. Today, the world’s glaciers are in retreat, sped up by relatively rapid warming of the globe. In our own Glacier National Park in Montana, only 26 named glaciers remain out of the 150 known in 1850. They are predicted to be completely gone by 2030 if current warming continues at the same rate.

Here we have collected 13 stunning images of some of the world’s most impressive and beautiful glaciers, captured from space by astronauts and satellites.

from Stunning Views of Glaciers Seen From Space | Wired Science | Wired.com.