James Brady

Sea Change / Tionndadh na Mara

Swan1-600x415Cape Farewell’s Northern Isles Expedition 

From 19 August – 8 September Cape Farewell sails from Orkney to Shetland via Fair Isle with 2 crews of 11 artists and scientists on the 113-year-old Shetland community boat, the Swan. Sailors include Ursula Biemann, Julie Brook, James Brady, David Cross, John Cumming, Bryony Lavery, Ruth Maclennan, Deirdre Nelson, Karine Polwart, Inge Thomson, Jennifer Wilcox, Tom Rand and Tam Treanor. Along with scientists from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton and the International Centre for Island Technology, Heriot-Watt University, the artists will pursue research and new collaborations relating to climate impacts on ocean ecologies, fisheries, energy production and peatlands.

Sexy Peat / Tìr mo Rùin

Highland Print Studio and Cape Farewell are delighted to announce the commissioned artists for the Sexy Peat project, celebrating the ecology and heritage of the Lewis blanket bog and highlighting the significant role that peat plays in climate regulation. Alex Boyd, Anne Campbell, Jon Macleod, Kacper Kowalski, Murray Robertson and Paul Slater will follow summer residencies in Lewis with printmaking workshops in Inverness, leading to a touring exhibition of new work.

Follow Sea Change and on Twitter @CFSeaChange. 

Gaia Cabinet in Liverpool

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The Gaia Project in Liverpool created the Gaia Cabinet as an informal working and interaction space during the Liverpool Biennial.  Featuring work by a number of artists including James Brady, David Haley, Anne Earnshaw and Rebecca McKnight, to name a few.

Brady focused on dead leaves and leaf mould,

David Haley often writes on walls,

Anne Earnshaw’s images of water,

Rebecca McKnight’s exploration of food chains,

All images are from the Gaia Project web site.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

High Tide COP15 Project: Numbers

Between James Brady and Aviva Rahmani, they calculated close to 1 million people are engaged directly or indirectly in ecological art or audience members for it’s ideas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Ecoart

This is how we estimated it:

1. How many schools/ museums/ books-journals internationally the ecoart list serve alone (about 100 invited members) represents (ie., including residencies, publications, group & individual exhibitions)?

2. Estimate 2,000 audience venue impact total (av. 20 times 100 per person, a conservative figure I think)

3. Each venue represents about 200 min audience access per… = 400, 000 if my math is correct…+ secondary effect has to double that figure = close to 1 million (chatter with family members & friends assuming at lease one conversation per person and then there are workers for each venue: guards, bookkeepers, etc)

That’s a mighty constituency.

via High Tide COP15 Project: Numbers.