Illustrations

The Foraged Book Project

220583_103475879807133_1603288737_oA collaboration between renowned forager Fergus Drennan and artist James Wood to produce a unique book made entirely from plants foraged from the wild, and to host related public events that will offer participants deeply engaging interactions with the natural world including food making and participating arts.

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Together Fergus and James will collaborate on the production of a book. Physically every material used within the book will be foraged and processed by either Fergus or James. The content of the book will include information, recipes, illustrations, tips and hints on foraging and processing materials for food and art equipment. The book will show the wonderful possibilities that lie within the natural landscapessurrounding us. It will get people interested in foraging and will offer different perspectives on derelict urban plots, parks and green spaces – revealing the potential of how these spaces can be used beyond walking spots.

Whilst Fergus and James will develop the book as collaboration, a key part of the project will be to pass on the information and techniques we learn during the research stages of the books production to a wider audience as well as allowing them to participate in a form of sustainable art. To achieve this, we will carry out a number of workshops and wildlife tours that include teaching and performing some of the recipes used within the book whilst keeping a continued focus on some combined Artistic outcomes. For more information on up and coming workshops, exhibitions and tours join our mailing list or watch our twitter and facebook pages as well as the Workshops section of this site.

http://www.theforagedbookproject.co.uk/

Foraged Book on Facebook

“Making It” by Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen on bookshelves

Roman Jaster of mammut magazine is  happy to share that a book he designed has just been published.

Making It, Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen’s follow up to their much celebrated The Urban Homestead, is now available.

The book is a project-based how-to manual for the urban homesteader. It’s a joyful read packed with tons of useful information to get off the grid and start making things.

His talented collaborator Teira Johnson created the beautiful illustrations, while he designed the book.

You can take a look at it here: http://www.amazon.com/Making-Radical-Home-Post-Consumer-World/dp/1605294624

Feast on the Bridge at Southwark Bridge [11 September]

Southwark Bridge will be closed to traffic and transformed into a magical feasting environment as part of The Mayor’s Thames Festival, London’s largest free outdoor arts festival.

Curated by artist Clare Patey, Feast on the Bridge is a spectacular communal ‘harvest supper’ that aims to reconnect an urban public with the growing cycle and invite people to reclaim a public space in the heart of their city, share a meal and a conversation, dance and make merry.

This year’s Feast on the Bridge is designed by a team of artists lead by theatre designer Cathy Wren, who has created a chorus of scarecrows to line each side of the bridge. Rows of banqueting tables will run the entire length of the bridge which is covered by specially commissioned tablecloths with illustrations and food-related stories collected from Londoners by artist Sophie Herxheimer.

via Feast on the Bridge at Southwark Bridge [11 September].

Art for oil; protest and dystopianism


St Pauls – a late afternoon plunge, from Flooded London, 2009 by Squint Opera, a series imagining London in 2090.

The 2010 Art For Oil Diary is available now, price £5, full of illustrations like Squint Opera’s depiction of a man diving into the flooded ruins of St Paul’s Cathedral in a London flooded by rising waters. It’s a good snapshot of art as agitprop, containing works by Peter Kennard & Cat Picton PhillippsBeehive CollectivePedro Inoue and the Ultimate Holding Company.

If you want to argue that agit-prop strenghtens the resolve of the converted and increases the distance between them and those whose minds really do need to change then this is a casebook study, but hey, as a mass of work it does have real energy. The works that don’t beat you over the head with visions of a dystopian future often work better, like UHC’s trees breathe, ads suck taken from their Spring Shrouds series, originally commissioned by agit-comedian Mark Thomas, in which the Manchester collective covered 100 ad shells with plain white shrouds.

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology