Hot Air

Scientific evidence from Cambridge University!

We, at Arcola Theatre were thinking about getting an “air curtain” for our front door. An “air curtain” is when you have hot air blowing from above the door frame, to maintain the temperature inside although the door to the outside is open. Now we decided to close the door instead, after reading that this would cut 10 tonnes of our annual CO2 emissions. For more information about this research, look up “Close the Door” Campaign.

Go to Arcola Energy

Scientific evidence from Cambridge University!

We, at Arcola Theatre were thinking about getting an “air curtain” for our front door. An “air curtain” is when you have hot air blowing from above the door frame, to maintain the temperature inside although the door to the outside is open. Now we decided to close the door instead, after reading that this would cut 10 tonnes of our annual CO2 emissions. For more information about this research, look up “Close the Door” Campaign.

Go to Arcola Energy

Hot Air

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The Chicago Reader published a blistering review of the Cape Farewell exhibition currently at Columbia College.

“This sort of easy moralism, pandering to a like-minded audience, is bad enough. It’s the bland egotism that’s truly unsettling. The artists have put a hand on nature, framing it, manipulating it, and hauling it home like a lion pelt collected on a safari. They emulate the hubris they’re trying to indict. They suggest that nature is ours to have, hold, and fuck with. And fuck, with its sexual connotations, is the right word, too: there’s sadism in the unacknowledged, fetishized lust for control that’s put on display here. The world serves and is subsumed into the artists, who use it for their own pleasure and what they take to be its good.”

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

How to stay afloat in the welter of data

This is a cross-post from John Thackara’s Doors of Perception newsletter – one well worth signing up to:

LOOK AT THE BIG NUMBERS, NOT AT THE SMALL NUMBERS (BOOK)
[…] I’m reading a fantastically useful new book:
Sustainable energy – without the hot air. Its author, David McKay, Professor of
Natural Philosophy at Cambridge University, has responded to an urgent global
challenge: how to make sense of the conflicting claims and information bandied
about on all matters eco. The book is filled with insights like this one:
“Leaving mobile phone chargers plugged in is often held up as an example of a
behavioural eco-crime. The truth is that the amount of energy saved by switching
off a phone charger is exactly the same as the energy used by driving an average
car for one second”. Prof McKay desevres a Nobel Prize for Usefulness. I boughbt
the hardcopy, but you can download the book free:
http://www.withouthotair.com/

Don’t be put off by the vileness of McKay’s site design, though.


Go to RSA Arts & Ecology