Guest Curator

Betsy Damon’s Water Rules-Life

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Eco-artist Betsy Damon’s work Water Rules-Life will be exhibited as part of Feminist and…, organized by Guest Curator Hilary Robinson at the Mattress Factory Art Museumin Pittsburgh (USA). This exhibition, open from September 7th 2012 to May 26th 2013, aims to “show that feminism is not a single-issue set of politics but rather a multi-vocal, multi-generational and multi-cultural evolution of thinking and practices.”

Damon’s installation is “seeking lost rivers in Pittsburgh”, investigating water mismanagement by the city, and echoing a community mobilization effort in the neighborhood of  Larimer that involved rainwater harvesting.

Museum website

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art presents its annual exhibition of work by artists from the mid Hudson Valley.

The exhibition will run from June 23 to November 4, 2012 in the museum’s Alice and Horace Chandler Gallery and North Gallery.

This year’s exhibition titled Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012 is organized by guest curator Linda Weintraub. Ms. Weintraub served as the first director of the Edith C. Blum Art Institute at Bard College where she originated 50 exhibitions and published over 20 catalogues. She is the author of several books about contemporary art including To Life! Eco Art in Pursuit of a Sustainable Planet, to be published by the University of California Press in 2012.

For Dear Mother Nature: Hudson Valley Artists 2012, Ms. Weintraub invited artists to send something to Mother Nature that expresses their relationship to her and their feelings about her. What would it be? Love letter? Care package? Medal of honor? Bill for unfulfilled promises? Payment for services rendered? Prayer for guidance? Crutches for support? Bouquet of praise? Compensation for damages? Reward for effort? Entreaty for forgiveness? Pledge of devotion? Summons for misconduct? Condolences? Advice? Warnings?

You can read an interview with the curator here.

For more information about the exhibition, you can go to http://www.newpaltz.edu/museum/exhibitions/exhibitions_6.html

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Beyond the Horizon at Deutsche Bank NYC

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace
June 6 – September 21, 2011

Opening June 15th, 6:30 – 8:30pm

Deutsche Bank 60 Wall Street Gallery, NYC

Amy Lipton, guest curator

ID required for entry: RSVP HERE

Beyond the Horizon explores contemporary views of nature and habitat expressed through the tradition of landscape painting and drawing. Fourteen New York-based artists in Beyond the Horizon envision specific places from perceptual, historical and conceptual perspectives while at the same time they record the ongoing evolution of human interaction upon the environment. Previously held notions of nature vs. culture have changed for the 21st century and it is increasingly clear that all of life is one interconnected and interdependent system. Underlying the works in Beyond the Horizon is an acute awareness of environmental issues such as climate change, overpopulation, habitat changes, recycling, waste disposal, and reclamation. Some of the artists are committed to merging their art with action and implementation, while others are more interpretive. Using realism, fantasy or process as a source for imagination and transformation, they seek to create an awareness of loss and beauty in the marginal, the overused and the threatened.

Exhibition tours, an opportunity to ‘Meet the Artists’ and a panel discussion are planned

The artists are all based in the NY region and include Joy Garnett, Eva Strubel, Lisa Sanditz, Jason Middlebrook, Sarah McCoubrey, Eve Andree Laramee,George Boorujy, Peter Edlund, Sarah Trigg, Charlotte Schulz, Marion Wilson, Patricia Johanson, Aviva Rahmani,Spencer Finch

 

ecoartapace is one of the leading international organizations in a growing community of artists, scientists, curators, writers, nonprofits and businesses who are developing creative and innovative strategies to address our global environmental issues. We promote a diverse range of artworks that are participatory, collaborative, interdisciplinary and uniquely educational. Our philosophy embodies a broader concept of art in its relationship to the world and seeks to connect human beings aesthetically with the awareness of larger ecological systems.

Founded in 1997 by Tricia Watts as an art and nature center in development, ecoartspace was one of the first websites online dedicated to art and environmental issues. New York City curator Amy Lipton joined Watts in 1999, and together they have curated numerous exhibitions, participated on panels, given lectures at universities, developed programs and curricula, ad written essays for publications from both the East and West Coasts. They advocate for international artists whose projects range from scientifically based ecological restoration to product based functional artworks, from temporal works created outdoors with nature to eco-social interventions in the urban public sphere, as well as more traditional art objects.

ecoartspace has been a project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs in
Los Angeles since 1999.

Go to EcoArtSpace

Terroir at the Cheese Factory, Northern California

Finding a venue for both indoor and outdoor art installations, where foot traffic is high, is an art and nature curator’s dream. Last fall, a start up organization called Art at the Cheese Factory, invited me to guest curator the inaugural show at an historic cheese factory in Marin County, 45 minutes North of the Golden Gate Bridge. When I found out that foot traffic at the Marin Cheese Factory is 150,000 visitors a year, my immediate response was “lets do it.” I cannot tell you how many times I have organized group shows, working with over twenty artists, and then have 2,000 people actually come see the show during a two month viewing. It is so much work that I often wonder to myself “why do I do this?” After curating Hybrid Fields in 2006, in Sonoma County, I realized that art and agriculture, combined, are a regional favorite that captures the interest of both foodies and art lovers. Here where happy cows, goats, and sheep roam the hillsides, and vineyards abound, the real challenge has been engaging a culture of mostly landscape painters and object makers in a dialogue on the role that contemporary art can play in expanding the conversations on land and aesthetics. Not that there is isn’t an audience that can have this type of conversation, it has mostly been a resistance to what is perceived as an urban or “city” conversation. During a visit to the UK a little over a year ago, what intrigued me was the commitment by the government to support not only the arts in rural areas, but to also raise the level of conversation about the role rural populations play in the larger culture. It is almost as if the artist has been sent from the Art World to acknowledge what remains of the rural lifestyle that existed say in the 1950s and 60s. And, then there is the history of the place that intrigues the artist. Who lived there and why, their stories. These rich remains in rural areas are savored by artists.

Terroir: A Sense of Place is an exhibition of 28 artists from the Bay Area who through paintings, photography, sculpture, installations, and performative events offer their take on a relationship with soil, air, and water; all the elements that make up our watersheds, ecosystems, and local environment.

For more information go to the exhibition blog at http://artatthecheesefactory.blogspot.com

Go to EcoArtSpace