Drawing

Eco Design and Sustainable Production Practice with Sholeh Johnston / Julie’s Bicycle at WSD2013

Sustainability-Julies-Bicyle-2webThurs 12 Sept 14.30 – 16.00

The Willow Theatre

Drawing on practical examples and research into sustainable production practice, Sholeh Johnston from pioneering group Julie’s Bicycle will discuss how designers and makers are developing new ways of working, using new materials and technologies, and engaging their supply chain to green their work.

Sholeh will be joined by expert speakers to explore what “eco design” means in practical terms, as well as the wider role of designers and makers in shaping a more sustainable performing arts sector.

Open to all.

Price: £6

BUY TICKETS 

Key contributors

Sholeh Johnston; Arts Programme Manager; Julie’s Bicycle – http://www.juliesbicycle.com

Donyale Werle – http://www.donyalewerle.com/

Tanja Beer – http://www.tanjabeer.com/

 

Agnes Denes stretches the canvas as far as it can go – NYTimes.com

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Thanks to Amy Lipton for highlighting this interesting article in the NY Times on Agnes Denes and her multifaceted work.  If you don’t know Wheatfield – a confrontation, then check it out, but also look at Denes’ drawing.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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“ID”ographs!

This post comes to you from Cultura21

“ID”ographs is a drawing activity in which you create your own personally meaningful symbol.

It is a publication of ARTSpring, a China-based curatorial hub that brings art practitioners together with organizations that are searching for new ways of carrying out their activities and connecting with people. IDographs was designed as part of an ongoing workshop series held with a group of university and high-school students in Shanghai.

For more information about ARTSpring programs and publications, please visit art-spring.org

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Artists and Scientists

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Artist Lisa Roberts worked with scientists investigating the life of Krill deep in the ocean.  Lisa Roberts’ drawings, based on a very blurry video from the bottom of the ocean, articulates what she could see.  She focused on understanding the ‘dance’ to the point that she could draw and then animate it.  Lisa was not illustrating something scientists already knew.  Rather by working with scientists, her drawing and animation skills enabled everyone to understand something no-one hitherto knew.  She ended up as co-author of a paper in the Journal of Plankton Research.  The web site Antarctic Animation also demonstrates the to-and-fro of dialogue between artist and scientist working out what’s going on.

 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

The Big Draw under The Black Cloud

bigdrawbristol
Two projects we’ve been involved with came together in a good way this weekend. The idea forThe Black Cloud, the public shelter artwork created by Heather and Ivan Morison emerged out of a Bristol residency the RSA Arts & Ecology Centre organised back in 2007, with the support of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Curated by Situations, the shelter has been hosting a series of community events based loosely on how we imagine our uncertain future – all held literally under The Black Cloud.  After the discussion it was also host to The Big Draw, the Campaign For Drawing’s great project to get as many people drawing as possible. This year is their tenth year and they asked The RSA Arts & Ecology Centre to pick one of the themes; we chose Look to the future: work together to combat climate change.

Michaela Crimmin, Head of Arts at the RSA was down there this weekend and took this on her phone.

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology

Darwin’s tree: the Eureka moment

Tania Kovats’ TREE will be unveiled at the Natural History Museum tomorrow. It’s a special commission for Darwin 200. In an interview with Tom Bailey for RSA Arts & Ecology, she talks about the process of thought that led her to take a thin section from a 200-year-old oak tree. There’s one great section in which she mentions the extraordinary page from Darwin’s notebook,  in which he’s written “I think”, then drawn his first representation of the evolutionary “tree of life”, and then about what it makes her aspire to as an artist:

What, if any, other artistic interpretations of evolutionary theory, or natural history, have influenced your work?

The I think drawing is definitely a drawing that I’ve been compelled by for quite a long time, partly because of how amazingly well it describes a moment of conception. It’s like the idea is happening in front of you when you look at that drawing. In drawing there’s an exchange between thought and the mark that you make, the drawing becomes a trace of that moment. So I think that drawing is so exciting, partly because it’s also very simple. The thing that compels me about Darwin’s evolutionary theory is that you have a really simple answer to a very big, complex question. A lot of the artworks that I feel are strongest (and I strive to do this in my own work) are incredibly simple in essence, but may have many complex readings that can be projected onto them. A dumb art work is one that you can usually talk about the longest. An artwork that has something very simple at its core then lends itself to constant reflection, and lots of layering can go on.

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology