Derelict

The Foraged Book Project

220583_103475879807133_1603288737_oA collaboration between renowned forager Fergus Drennan and artist James Wood to produce a unique book made entirely from plants foraged from the wild, and to host related public events that will offer participants deeply engaging interactions with the natural world including food making and participating arts.

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Together Fergus and James will collaborate on the production of a book. Physically every material used within the book will be foraged and processed by either Fergus or James. The content of the book will include information, recipes, illustrations, tips and hints on foraging and processing materials for food and art equipment. The book will show the wonderful possibilities that lie within the natural landscapessurrounding us. It will get people interested in foraging and will offer different perspectives on derelict urban plots, parks and green spaces – revealing the potential of how these spaces can be used beyond walking spots.

Whilst Fergus and James will develop the book as collaboration, a key part of the project will be to pass on the information and techniques we learn during the research stages of the books production to a wider audience as well as allowing them to participate in a form of sustainable art. To achieve this, we will carry out a number of workshops and wildlife tours that include teaching and performing some of the recipes used within the book whilst keeping a continued focus on some combined Artistic outcomes. For more information on up and coming workshops, exhibitions and tours join our mailing list or watch our twitter and facebook pages as well as the Workshops section of this site.

http://www.theforagedbookproject.co.uk/

Foraged Book on Facebook

Open source city: Vancouver

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Focus on the  Zen question: “What can we not do?” Not cut down weeds, not tidy up derelict ground, not plan, organise, manage and control parts of our cities.  Asking how an open source ethos might affect urban living. Read the rest of the article in the Vancouver Observer here.

Oliver Kellhammer is leading a week-long investigation into some of these topics entitled Open Source City: Field Study at Emily Carr University from June 20-24th. It’s part of the Continuing Studies Program and there is still space available. More info here: http://www.ecuad.ca/programs/courses/CESE/355/SU01

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland