Contemplation

Are They Edible? (entertainment you can taste)

Odysseus

CONTRIBUTE HERE

ARE THEY EDIBLE? has been selected to be presented by La MaMa Theatre Puppet Series – a bi-annual puppet series presented by the reputable La MaMa Theatre.  It will preimere from November 7-10, 2013 at The Club.

Are They Edible? is a multi-sensory puppetry performance inspired by Homer’s epics: the Iliad and the Odyssey. It takes place in an interactive setting in which food consumption is used as a way to engage the audience in a tactile discourse on the relationship between war, heroes, and hunger (or the urge to consume).

Initiated by war then cursed by pride, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey are tales of war, of the construction and destruction of heroes, of how hunger and thirst for violence are never satisfied, and of wearied soldiers’ journey – and ultimately one soldier’s journey home. While our memory mostly lingers around the heroic acts associated with these tales, I want to emphasize the image of only ONE soldier, Odysseus, succeeding in returning home and his son Telemachus, meanwhile, growing up to join him in slaughtering the suitors. Through this act, Telemachus becomes the next hero preparing for another Trojan War. This parallels how we encourage and celebrate the sacrifices from our generations of military service.

During the performance, audiences will be served food along with red wine. In addition, they will be led literally on their feet to journey through different puppetry stations as a way to put them inside the experiences similar to Odysseus’ and a given birds’-eye view of the scope of atrocities with the eerie sense that this is all constructed for their enjoyment and available for their consumption or manipulation.

The tone the piece sets out to create is of uneasy playfulness, where at times the audience is able to taste, enjoy, and comment on the action with one another, and at other times will be lulled into private contemplation through immersive visual, aural, and sense-of-taste experiences.

We are working hard towards making this premiere a great success but need a little extra financial help to support all the wonderful artists who are involved in the project, many of whom I’ve been collaborating with for years. This project is blessed by their talent and commitment so please join me in supporting them by making a donation today.

Because this is an “all or nothing” type campaign, I am setting the goal at $6,000 to cover the costs of supplies and puppet creation as well as ARTISTS and every dollar that exceeds this goal will continue towards supporting the artists involved with my new performance.

Artists involved in this production include:

  • Torry Bend (Set and Puppet Designer – since 2011)
  • Burke Brown (Lighting Designer – since 2011) * Andrew Butler (Performer – since 2012)
  • Nikki Calonge (Performer – since 2011)
  • Elizabeth Eggert (Technical Direction)
  • Nicole Greene (Stage Manager – since 2011)
  • Phillip Gulley (Video Designer – since 2012)
  • Connie Hall (Culinary Designer – since 2011)
  • Karl Hinze (Composer)
  • Amy Jensen (Dramaturg – since 2011)
  • Tom Lee (Puppet Designer & Builder)
  • Maggie Robinson (Performer)
  • Rachel Schapira (Props and Puppet Designer – since 2012)
  • Margaret Schedel (Sound Designer) – Bobby McElver was the original designer but unfortunately his schedule won’t allow him to work on this.
  • Julia Sirna-Frest (Performer – since 2011)
  • Matthew Stephen Smith (Playwright)
  • Marisa Lark Wallin (Performer – since 2011)
  • Meghan Williams (Performer) and Puppet Designer – since 2011)

AGUAZERO Call for Art

Theme:
We are inviting submissions in water-based medium on or with paper.
The competition has an environmental agenda requesting submissions to reference the contrary character of climate change. For example, increased desertification and the escalating effects of weather events such as flooding and soil erosion.
The work should be based on observation, experience and invention. It must be as involved with the process and materials of painting/drawing etc. as with the response to climate change.
We are interested in works that invite close scrutiny and, like environmental events in the world around us, reveal themselves gradually and steadily over time, prompting reaction and renewed contemplation of the ecological challenges the world faces.
Prize:
A two week residency at Cortijada Los Gázquez / Joya: arte + ecologia, Andalucía, Spain including travel costs within Europe (not accommodation while in transit). Winners from outside of Europe can have their travel expenses paid once they are within the EU.
The winner will have sole use of a thirty square meter studio and 20 hectares of land for the period. Accommodation and meals are included as is collection and return to the nearest public transport system. Resident artists will be featured on the Joya: arte + ecología web page, which will include biographical information and images. The work undertaken during the residency will also be documented and entered into our archive.
http://www.losgazquez.com/en/joya/

Nature and Peace at Geumgang Nature Art Biennale by guest blogger Anke Mellin

Geumgang Nature Art Biennale was first held in 2004 and again in 2006 and 2008. This year it is titled “Nature and Peace.” Yatoo was founded almost 30 years ago in Gongju, in the Chungnam Province, 150 km south-west of Seoul. Yatoo, is the name of the Korean Nature Artists Association which organizes the Geumgang Nature Art Biennale and means “Thrown into the field”. The Korean artists use the term “thrown into field,” because, as Koreans, they feel the responsibility for nature is theirs. Why? Korea is a unique country in many ways. As a technically advanced society, it lives collectively in respect for ancient culture and nature. It requires individuals to responsibly share their experiences abroad, to learn from other cultures how to honor nature because many countries have this problem now. This has resulted in Korea being one of the largest Land Art or Nature Art centers in the world.

Within the exhibition’s title, and the rhetoric of the artworks is a reflection of how people could behave so as not to discourage or disrupt other species, the way they have discouraged swallows. How can one live in harmony with the whole of nature? Art gives us advice in finding answers to this sticky question. Trees, water, light, sound and even wind become a part of the artist‘s installations. They will be standing on site for some time and the site will change its form and structure with help form nature itself. The whole process can be observed in the park and at the Geumgang riverbank throughout the year.

The combined rich and diverse histories of this year’s participants guarantees a high level of quality work. We have 15 artists from 13 different countries: Ghana, Cameroon, India, Poland, USA, Germany, Peru, Philippines, Netherlands, New Zealand, USA, Canada, Hungary, Bulgaria and Japan, and 12 artists from the host country, South Korea. The character of each creator’s piece is shaped by the unique culture, history and geography of his or her country of origin. Each piece is also marked by the artist’s specific relationship to nature. It is not surprising that the installations differ from each other to such an extent.

Nereus Patrick Cheo, Cameroon (above), was inspired by debris washed up onto the beach by the Atlantic to create “The Watch Tower Kiosk.” He used found plastic water, beer and soft-drink bottles to make an open structure which talks about a worldwide problem: A great majority of the world’s population consume water and drinks from these bottles but at least half of these bottles are never recycled. His project entailed the construction of a Kiosk-like shape 5m high and 3 x 4m wide. The kiosk is a dome shaped sculpture beautifully created from used bottles woven together with wire on a base of bamboo, wood and nails. Utilising the bottles as an artistic statement, he has given them a new life.The work offers an opportunity for attention, care and open vistas for reflection on how we interact with our environment.

For Roger Tibon, Philippines (above), the watchwords “nature and peace” are a metaphors for a journey uniquely associated with the boat. This is not surprising considering that the Philippines are comprised of more than seven thousand islands. Many of them are inhabited by people who have never left them, and often travel by boat. The boats are more than just a way of movement and communication for them. The boat, with three figures on it, has been installed hanging under one of the cities bridges enabling many people travel over this traveling symbol. Of course the real contemplation begins when we reach a beautiful riverbank and silently, listening to sound of the water and gaze at the sculpture from a distance.

New Zealand artist, Donald Buglass’ Cell (above), relies on the beauty of physics to hold itself up. Cut sections of tree trunk support each other and demonstrate a link between the constructive tendencies of humans and the environment. “Cell” represents the beauty and balance of nature. It is the cells of plants, nucleus of an atom or, perhaps, the rising sun. At the same time it portrays a fundamental shape for shelter (in this case, one we are excluded from) and the peace and security that this might otherwise offer us. His work also has underlying references to the ancient graves at Yeonmisan.

Karen Macher Nesta (above), Peru, is an artist who believes in specific interaction between mother earth and Her inhabitants. In the ancient beliefs of her country, the land must be respected. Consequently people offer gifts to nature: fruit, animal blood, coca leaves etc., asking Her to be more fertile and calm. Earthquakes are also in her nature, and if it comes to this kind of disaster it means that She is angry. The artist used rabbits as a symbol of fertility because of their fast reproduction capacity. The rabbit figures were made from clay, and were designed to last for a short period of time in order to return to the earth where they came from (some cement has been added to extend this period). Over thirty larger-than-life rabbits are located around main path in the Ecological Park. The rabbits will eventually disappear and be absorbed into the forest floor.

The work of Pawel Chlebek Odebek, Poland, refers to central values such as family, love and care. In “The New Generation” (above) the artist points out the mystery of new life and implies its dependence on our care. The art-work is a pine sapling planted in soil between the two large opposing torsos, male and female. Eventually the project will result in the interaction between the carved form and nature’s power (as the growing tree trunk expands). Time is co-creator of this piece.

For these artists, nature and peace are much more than just words.

Facts:

Organizer – Korean Nature Artist Association Yatoo (established 1981)

The year of the first Nature Art Biennale – 2004

Term of exhibition – three months, from 16th September until 15th November 2010

2010 Participants:

Korean: Chunchung Kang, Heejoon Kang, Hyunhie Ko, Soonim Kim, Yongik Kim, Haesim Kim, Bongi Park, Seunghoon Byun, Seunggu Ryu, Eungwoo Ri, Chungyeon Cho, Kang Hur

International: Chintan Upadhyay (India), Donald Buglass (New Zealand), Eizo Sakata (Japan/France), Ichi Ikeda (Japan), Karen Macher Nesta (Peru), Karin van der Molen (Netherlands), Nereus Patrick Cheo (Cameroon), Patrick Tagoe-Turkson (Ghana), Pawel Chlebek Odebek (Poland), Roger Tibon (Philippines), Ryszard Litwiniuk (Canada/Poland), Suzy Sureck (USA), Toni Schaller (Germany), Sandor Vass (Hungary)

The full article will be published in the upcoming second issue of WEAD magazine online soon HERE.