Chris Taylor

Art, Environment, and Place

Many innovative approaches to form and content are evolving in contemporary arts practice that transcend traditional boundaries of art making. Many artists are integrating various field and research strategies borrowed from the natural sciences, geography, and other disciplines to create rich interdisciplinary works of art that are often collaborative and experimental in nature. The interdisciplinary nature of these art works encourages a diverse and varied audience.

This honors seminar course (HONORS 413 Section 02) scheduled for Fall 2010 at San Diego State University will be centered around focused readings, discussions, presentations, screenings, and field trips. Students will conceive and execute a final project proposal that may take the form of a hybrid documentary, temporary site-specific artwork or installation, digital multimedia feature, performance, text, or other work that addresses social, cultural, environmental, geographical, and/or political issues of a local or regional ecology, site, or subject. Special emphasis will be placed on projects that are collaborative, incorporate sustainable design strategies, promote environmental awareness through education, and/or directly encourage audience participation. Projects, possibly collaborative in nature, will be distilled, executed, and documented at the conclusion of the course. A background in art is not required to take this course. Students from all academic and disciplinary areas are encouraged to apply.

The course will culminate in an immersive three-day weekend field study workshop at the Salton Sea scheduled for the weekend of November 19 – 21, 2010. During this workshop students will be able to directly experience and respond to place over an embedded field research period.  Visiting artist/architect,Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, will join us for this weekend field experience. Students will be prepared before embarking on the field trip through readings and presentations on diverse topics related to the site including but not limited to regional water politics, agricultural/real estate economies, local ecologies, military presence, tourism, outsider art, fringe subcultures among others. A culminating art exhibit and publication will be organized to document student interdisciplinary projects resulting from this course and workshop.

This course will meet Wednesdays from 4 to 6:40 pm in PSFA-113 during fall semester 2010..

via Art, Environment, and Place.

OUR MAGNIFICENT EARTH:Loomstate Celebrates The 40th Anniversary Of Earth Day

40 Drummers Ceremony Led By Hisham Akira Bharoocha (SOFT CIRCLE)
Kid Millions (ONEIDA)
Butchy Fuego (PIT ER PAT / ASKA)
Benjamin Vida (SOFT CIRCLE)
Robert AA Lowe (LICHENS)
DJ Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear)
Psychic Readings
Face Painting

Wednesday, April 14th
7-10pm

GOOD UNITS AT HUDSON
356 West 58th St (Between 8th + 9th Ave)

RSVP@LOOMSTATE.ORG

Free Bus Pick Up On The Bowery Every 30 Minutes From 6:30PM-9:00PM
From: ROGAN STORE, 330 Bowery ST (Corner Of Bond)
To: GOOD UNITS AT HUDSON, 356 W 58th ST

FRIENDS OF LOOMSTATE: PAMELA LOVE, GOOD UNITS AT HUDSON, KEDS, PERRIER, VITA COCO, FASHION LOVES, TRACKSTAR, SPOKE VISUALS, and THE SMILE.


Land Art Internet Coma

Thanksgiving long past, and holiday feasts ahead, but I’m already stuffed, thank you, with this years’ steady eco-art diet of Land Art adventures and COP15 coverage. It’s hard not to feel overwhelmed with art-nerd-glee. There is such a thing as an information coma, I swear.

The art-and-landscape dishes started churning out of the Nevada Museum of Art kitchen with its LAND/ART symposium way back in June: that event kicked off a summer-into-fall series of lectures, performances, exhibits and tours that made NMA the best excuse to want to go to Nevada since Burning Man. Later in the year Land Arts of the American West, a field program directed by Chris Taylor, took some lucky followers on a tour of renowned site-specific installations and Land Artworks. Unfortunately, some of us had to stay at home with our Winnebagos, experiencing most of the glory over the internet.

This month, while the delegates at COP15 tried to negotiate our way into a non-binding middle ground, Ian Garrett and William Shaw told us what artists were doing to mitigate the damage. There’s great coverage of actions, protests and memes by Shaw on the RSA blog– Garrett did comprehensive exhibition coverage and interviews for CSPA. It seems the artworks that struck the most resonant chord were also political actions: New Life Copenhagen, The Yes Men’s fake press release, actions that addressed COP15’s inaccessibility and ineffectiveness. Comedian Eugene Mirman voiced a couple of unanswered questions. The philosophical culmination is GOOD COP, an alternative Bella Center installed at Gallery Poulsen Contemporary Fine Arts in Copenhagen, where everyone from Daryl Hannah to Bill McKibben got some time on the mic to make their international declarations. If the dialogue keeps running this fierce, I’m not worried. That is to say: Burp.

Go to the Green Museum

APInews: Panel: Art + Land Reclamation, Urban Ecology

The role that art, architecture and design play in land reclamation and urban ecology is topic of an upcoming panel at Parsons the New School for Design in N.Y.C. The panel, set for April 10, 2009, will discuss transdisciplinary fieldwork in art, landscape architecture and industrial reclamation, focusing on the field methods of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech and the Incubo Atacama Lab in Chile. Land Arts, directed by Chris Taylor, is a field program that investigates the intersection of geomorphology and human construction beginning with the land and extending through the complex social and ecological processes that produce contemporary landscapes. The Incubo Atacama Lab project began when the curatorial exchange organization Incubo invited Taylor to bring the working methods of Land Arts to Chile. Taylor will participate along with Incubo artists and more.

via APInews: Panel: Art + Land Reclamation, Urban Ecology .

Report from CAA 2009, Los Angeles

This was my fourth College Art Association conference over a ten year period. My first being in Los Angeles in 1999. Not only did I attend that year because I lived in LA at the time, I was also interested to attend a studio session entitled Off the Mainstream, Into The Mainstream. The session included three chairs and nine artists presenting the state of environmental art from the 1990s, including mostly artists from California. This was the panel that set me on course to participate in an ecoart dialogue listerve online for the last ten years.

Ten years later, CAA 2009, was once again in LA, although this time there were several panels that crossed over into the realm of science or ecology including:
Proof: Art Illuminating Science with artists Lillian Ball and Aviva Rahmani; Green Foundations: Curricular and Environmental Sustainability with Linda Weintraub; Place Markers: Artists, Technology, and Landscape; The Ecological Imagination: From Land Art to BioArt; and Land Use in Contemporary Art, Part I & II.

Since I lived in Los Angeles for more than twenty years, I decided this CAA to propose a paper for the Land Art panel to present examples of artists working outdoors in Southern California from 1999-2008. I focused on work that was least invasive and noted a progression of a land ethic by artists who were in the following exhibitions: Malibu Art Ranch 1997; SaFARi at the Old LA Zoo 1998; Escondido Phoenix 1999; Newtown Trail Markers 2001; Earthworks NOW Biennial 2003/5; HDTS 2001-2008; and MOISTURE 2001-2008. Other panelists included Kimberly Paice from University of Cincinnati who gave a talk “On Wheat” that mostly focused on Agnes Denes’ Wheatfield: A Confrontation. She also presented Dennis Oppenheim’s’ field work “Cancelled Crop” and “Directed Seeding” both from 1969. Chris Taylor, co-creator of Land Arts of the American West, a program operating from Texas and University of New Mexico, presented a visual diary of a caravan road trip he took with students to cultural sites and earth/land art sites in the desert Southwest over a two month period in one semester. They create ephemeral work on the land and return to the campus to create work for a gallery exhibition. Ann Wolfe with the Nevada Museum of Art gave a paper on Chris Drury and his Mushroom work they recently comissioned him to do. The Museum sponsored the Art+Environment conference in Reno last fall where Ann also gave a presentation. Her emphasis was that the Museum in Reno is the first of its kind to make Art+Environment its curatorial thematic. She also announced that the Director of the program, William Fox, has begun to create an archive of ephemera related to projects created in and near Nevada in the desert (Heizer/deMaria).

Land Art is a term that mostly refers to a movement from the 1970s, large-scale or monumental earth art, meant to be seen from far away. You often hear this term from Europe, particularly from the UK, to describe earth art, smaller works in the landscape, even ephemeral. However, after this panel, I believe there was some consensus that Land Art is a historical term referring to work created in the desert Southwest and does not define the type of work being done today. Panel Chair Kirsten Swenson referred to this new work as a Land-based Art Practice. And, from there, the medium is the message. As we know, there is still plop art happening (even at High Desert Test Sites). And, much of the art that is created outdoors is simply using nature as a gallery or cheap studio space. The real trick is to work with the land but not impact it, thus the title of my talk
Land Ethics:Post Land Art. Some better examples of this would include audio tour projects like Invisible 5 & Jack Rabbit Homestead by Kim Stringfellow, or more urban/rural dialogic/relational mapping/tour projects like Fallen Fruit or LA Urban Rangers.

Or, how about Bruce Nauman’s proposal for a sky writing in 1969 entitled “Leave the Land Alone.” This is a work I only found out about in the inaugural issue of Mammut magazine (Fall 2008), in an article with the same title written by Andrew Bernardini. He stated that this was Nauman’s response written in a letter to a gallery who invited him to participate in an earth art exhibition. The work was never realized and the letter has not been found. This sounds like a perfect project for the Center for Land Use (CLUI) to execute with Nauman, in the clear blue skies of Nevada?

 

Go to EcoArtSpace