California College Of The Arts

THE FUTURE IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be, curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo, will be on display in the Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery at Trinity University from March 1- April 7, 2012. There will be an opening reception on March 1st from 5-7pm.  A gallery talk with the curator and artists will begin at 6pm.

The Future is Not What it Used To Be features works by thirteen artists exploring human incursion on the landscape. Through a variety of media, these artists offer contrasting views of the landscape as touched by human hand through both destruction and conservation.  The exhibition asks, when did nature turn from sustained into sustainable?

The exhibition features artists Ansel Adams; Jeana Baumgardner and Sandy Carson from Austin; Erik Grow and Scot Polach from San Francisco; Caleb Jagger and Todd Jagger from Fort Davis, Texas; Adam Katseff from Stanford, California; Leigh Anne Lester from San Antonio; Allie Mount from Portland, Oregon; Kristin Musgnug from Fayetteville, Arkansas; Adam Waldron-Blain from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and Liz Ward from Castroville, Texas.

Curator Amanda Roscoe Mayo is a graduate of Trinity University where she majored in studio art.  She is now the Co-Director of PLAySPACE Gallery at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, California, where she is a candidate for a Masters in Curatorial Practice. She also co-founded R&R, a curatorial collective based in San Francisco.

Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery

Dicke Art Building, Department of Art and Art History

Trinity University, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX, 78212

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 1-5pm

H20 – Preview: Matthew Hebert

This post comes to you from Green Public Art

On May 6, 2011, H20: The Art of Conservation, at the Water Conservation Garden, San Diego, CA, will open to the public. Green Public Art reviewed over 1100 artists portfolios before inviting 14 San Diego artists to participate in the exhibition which offers San Diego homeowners an artistic alternative to incorporate water conservation into their own garden spaces. Green Public Art awarded each artist a mini-grant to develop their site-specific sculptures. In the weeks leading up to the exhibition opening the artist’s concepts will be revealed on this site. Questions? Contact Rebecca Ansert, Curator, Green Public Art at rebecca@greenpublicart.com.

CONCEPT: Special Deliveries is a series composed of three sculptures with solar powered mechanical peephole dioramas within. From the exterior each piece presents itself as a rural curbside mailbox mounted to a piece of plastic lumber and planted in a terracotta pot along with some cacti. The interiors feature unique dioramas depicting historic moments in various water reclamation projects of the western states. The viewer looks through a peephole and lowers the flag on the mailbox to activate the scene within. The pieces represent the construction of the Hoover Dam, the accidental creation of the Salton Sea, and the attack on the Los Angeles Aqueduct in Owens Valley.

ABOUT: Matthew Hebert creates work that deals with technology and its effect on the domestic environment and our sense of space. His work takes recognizable furniture forms and layers new forms of use and meaning into them. Ultimately, the work generates new forms of interaction between the object, environment, and the user. Matthew received his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley; and his Master of fine Arts at California College of the Arts. He has taught at several schools including the University of Wisconsin-Madison, CalArts and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is currently Assistant Professor of Furniture at San Diego State University. 

Rebecca Ansert, founder of Green Public Art, is an art consultant who specializes in artist solicitation, artist selection, and public art project management for both private and public agencies. She is a graduate of the master’s degree program in Public Art Studies at the University of Southern California and has a unique interest in how art can demonstrate green processes or utilize green design theories and techniques in LEED certified buildings.

Green Public Art is a Los Angeles-based consultancy that was founded in 2009 in an effort to advance the conversation of public art’s role in green building. The consultancy specializes in public art project development and management, artist solicitation and selection, creative community involvement and knowledge of LEED building requirements. Green Public Art also works with emerging and mid-career studio artists to demystify the public art process. The consultancy acts as a resource for artists to receive one-on-one consultation before, during, and after applying for a public art project.

Go to Green Public Art

Rising Tide Conference REPORT


I was only able to attend one day of the three day conference last weekend in the Bay Area. Entitled Rising Tide, organized by Kim Anno, and jointly hosted by California College of the Arts, San Francisco, and Stanford University, there was a diverse mix of planning, art history, contemporary art, and design/technology.

A few highlights from the early morning session entitled Remaking/Reconceiving: I learned about Form Based Zoning Codes where the public participates in a greater way to decide what goes where in communities/cities. And, I was reminded by Amy Franceschini of the great work by former Super Mayor of Bogata, Enrique Penalosa, who encouraged performance based transformations in sustainability (like using mimes to direct traffic). Here is a short video on his vision for NYC presented last summer:

In the next session,
Bonnie Sherk (creator of T
he Farm), moderated a panel called Material Culture Sustainability. Panel description: What are new materials that artists/designer/architects are experimenting with? What materials have impacts on which industries? Where are the holes in research? What is sustainable business? How is culture sustainable? Stephanie Syjuco presented her Counterfeit Crochet handbags; Lynda Grose presented the work of young designers doing Slow Fashion in her program at Sustainable Fashion Design program at CAA. And, Banny Bannerjee, Director of the Stanford Design program, talked about how human’s are always trying to defy nature, stretch its limits, mimic nature, refer to nature, flirt with nature, evoke nature. He had a great saying: Doing Things Right, Doing the Right Things.

After lunch we got a dose of “Green Capitalism” with Amy Berk presenting her work TWCDC (Together We Can Defeat Capitalism). She showed several projects where they used signage to express anti-capitalist views like a road sign that said “Stock Market Crash Ahead” from 2000; “Capitalism Stops at Nothing” at a BART Station; and STOP BUS(H) in the bus lane in Oakland. She also presented her work bed-in-for-peace project, which she conceived in 2001 in Australia (based on Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s performance). Basically her position was that true revolution is guided by true feelings of LOVE . . . . . and she proves this by driving around San Francisco in a “FRYBRID” car that runs on moonshine and represents the ethos of Marx (Capitalist production only develops the social process of production by simultaneously underminding the original process of all wealth, the soil and the worker). Next on this panel was Simon Sadler who made some great links with Steward Brand/Whole Earth Catalogue, Buckminster Fuller (design is a scientific study not an aesthetic one), and “soft tech” (the limits to growth, and small is beautiful).

In the following session entitled Futures, Amy Balkin gave a beautiful presentation on her Air Park project. She outlined how she researched carbon credits and set up her work, presenting basically signage about her conceptual dealings around who owns the air. A description of the project: Public Smog is a public park in the atmosphere that fluctuates in location and scale. Built through financial, legal, or political activities, Public Smog is subject to prevailing winds and the long-range transport of aerosols and gases. When built through the economic mechanism of emissions trading, the park opens above the region where offsets are purchased and withheld from use. Public Smog first opened briefly to the public during 2004 above California’s South Coast Air Quality Management District, and was open over the European Union through 2008. Balkin is now working on opening the park again in West Africa.

In the final panel of the day Shelia Kennedy showed her portable light project, which is going to receive a big award in May (she couldn’t tell us which), maybe the Fuller Challenge? and David Buuck shared about his project on Treasure Island in San Francisco, a tour called “Barge” looking at the paranoid landscapes of post industrial real estate.

There was a great gathering of people and it was a pleasure to finally meet Ian Garrett and see Miranda Wright again, both from Los Angeles with the Center for Sustainable Practices in the Arts who drove up for the conference.

For those of you who attended Friday and Sunday’s presentations, please comment and fill us in.

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Go to EcoArtSpace

The Rising Tide Conference Floats Many Boats

Rising Tide Conference

Last weekend, I was at the Rising Tide Conference: Art and Ecological Aesthetics, hosted by the California College of the Arts and Stanford University and was on a panel talking about the importance of art in any vision of human sustainability. I emphasized the notion that if we’re going to make art that is supposedly also “for the Earth” that we better think about what the Earth might actually need, otherwise it’s just green paint or wishful thinking. It might be helpful to consider art for human and non-human needs from beginning to end (materials, making and where it goes after we’re done with it, and after that). What would the worms and watersheds actually notice and appreciate? They had a very diverse group of speakers and some fun architectural design ideas floating around. Met some great artists in person (finally) who I’ve been wanting to connect with: Linda Gass and Ian Garrett of The Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, to name just a few. It’s good to interconnect and jabber at these things but we need more biologists, land managers, business people and public policy experts at these conferences. All of you in those fields, please consider inviting eco-artists and their ilk to your next conference and vice versa. We need to be building ever-larger arks people. NOAA indeed…

Go to the Green Museum

Rising Tide Conference, San Francisco: April 17th – 19th, 2009

The Rising Tide conference is a series of topically organized panels, seminars, and roundtable discussions, bringing together creative professionals, scholars and students to engage in conversations and debates about the intersections of ethics, aesthetics, and environmentalism.

The event includes panelsexhibitionsfilm screenings and satellite events. Rising Tide is jointly hosted by California College of the Arts, San Francisco, and Stanford University.David Buckland from Cape Farewell is one of the keynote speakers. Panel themes include politics and capitalism, mobility, cities, rivers and oceans and material culture.

This groundbreaking conference will be jointly hosted by California College of the Arts, San Francisco, and Stanford University this spring. Our audience and collaborators come from various disciplinary backgrounds. They are artists, activists, community organizers, venture capitalists, philanthropists, students, and faculty of Fine Arts, Design, Architecture, Writing, Criticism, Curatorial Practice and Environmental Sciences who are helping to push the green revolution to a tipping point.

The conference will convene on the San Francisco Campus of California College of the Arts on Friday, April 17th, on the Stanford Campus Saturday, April 18th, and at CCA on Sunday, April 19th. We are planning a series of satellite events (screenings, exhibitions, performances, lectures…) throughout the month of April.

www.risingtideconference.org

Go to the Ashden Directory