Boeckel

Su Grierson’s Intersections

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cbd20ef485c2df479f9d4944622b1c81The survey exhibition Intersections by Su Grierson opens this Sunday 30th June in Perth Concert Hall’s Threshold artspace,

Exhibition runs 30 June – 30 November 2013

Mon-Sat 10am-5pm (until 10pm on performance nights)

Commenting on her new project which features a combination of photography, video and sound installations as well as interactive elements across previously undiscovered art display areas in Perth Concert Hall’s Threshold artspace Su said,

Using combinations of video, sound and image I create installations that draw attention to, question, visually stimulate and propose the issues of my attention.

My hope is that through vision the work can stimulate thought and perhaps new understanding.

The Sunday Brunch opening is free and all are welcome but are asked to email numbers to i.nedkova@horsecross.co.uk

As well as selected earlier artworks which engage with contemporary landscape in non-traditional ways, Intersections features a newly commissioned work for the 22 screen Threshold wave. This new work follows from a 10-week residency in Fukushima Japan where she was able to visit the nuclear, earthquake and tsunami disaster areas and meet with the still dispossessed refugees as well as experience the beautiful snowy mountains of the Province (documentation on ecoartscotland here).

The accompanying book Intersections details Su Grierson’s land related art projects over the last 17 years and unusually includes invited texts from other professionals working in the rural arena, including John Brennan head of the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Edinburgh, Paul Kingsnorth writer and poet, Sascha Grierson organic farmer, Tristan Gooley writer, navigator and explorer and Jan Van Boeckel anthropologist, filmmaker and educator.

Rather than following the more usual pattern of using the book to position her work within the arena of contemporary art, Su has chosen to take the opportunity to relate it to the work of other professionals working in the rural environment.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Su Grierson’s correspondence from Fukushima Province collected

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Su Grierson has, with the assistance of Jan van Boeckel, collected her blogs from her residency in Fukushima Province in Japan which were posted to ecoartscotland.  She has added a lot of new images which did not originally feature.  The blogs describe her time meeting and living with people affected by the tsunami and nuclear meltdown.  Her visit took place two years after the event, but the consequences remain with the people on so many levels.

Ecoartscotland is pleased to include this collection as part of the ecoartscotland occasional papers.  There are hi res and lo res version available for download here: Su_Grierson_Corresponding_from_Fukushima_Province_Japan_hi_res Su_Grierson_Corresponding_from_Fukushima_Province_Japan_lo_res

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Approaches to Arts-based Environmental Education by Jan van Boeckel

Image from Nature Art Education site

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The Shorelines Symposium which took place at Rozelle Maclaurin included presentations by two keynotes Ian McGilchrist (author of The Master and his Emissary), Chris Drury (artist) as well as a number of others.

The Symposium was organised in conjunction with Alison Bell and Cathy Treadaway‘s exhibition Shorelines currently at in the Maclaurin Galleries.  It was great that a Symposium of this quality took place in Ayr.  We need more of this quality of thinking and discussion.

Jan van Boeckel of the Nature – Art – Education research group at Aalto University, School of Art and Design, Helsinki, gave a short paper entitled Angels talking back and new organs of perception: Art making and intentionality in nature experience.  He has provided the abstract and link to the full paper.

ABSTRACT

This article is about the role of artistic process in connecting to the natural environment. In my research I have explored what participants experienced and learned when they engage in different types of arts-based environmental education (AEE) practices that I have facilitated. The premise of AEE is that efforts to learn about our (natural) environment can effectively take their starting point in an artistic activity, usually conducted in groups.

I found that, on the whole, two major orientations can be distinguished. One starts from the point of aesthetic sensibility: the tuning in with the senses, or with “a new organ of perception” (Goethe), in order to perceive “the more than human” with fresh new eyes. This tradition can be traced back to (but is by no means limited) to the Romantic Movement. Art in this context may help to amplify the receptivity of the senses and strengthen a sense of connectedness to the natural world.

The other major orientation in seeking bridges between nature and art builds on a view of artistic process as leading to unexpected outcomes and “emergent properties.” The fundamentally singular experience of making a work of art may evoke an aesthetic object that becomes a “self-sufficient, spiritually breathing subject” (Kadinsky). The art work can be spontaneously generative and multi-layered with meanings, some of which even ambiguous and paradoxical. But perhaps more importantly: it can catch the participant of an AEE activity by surprise; overwhelm him or her as “coming from behind one’s back.” The element of improvisation, of taking in the new and unanticipated and accommodating for it, is the core quality here.

These two orientations, when practiced as part of AEE, have implications to how we relate to nature through art. In the closing of this article I address the question whether it is possible to bridge the dualism between the two orientations.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland