Art Program

I-Park 2013 Artists-in-Residence Program Application

Screen-Shot-2012-12-02-at-6.37.05-PMApplication Deadline for Visual Arts, Music Composition/Sound Sculpture, Creative Writing, Moving Image: February 18, 2013

Application Deadline for Environmental Art, Landscape/Garden Design, Architecture: April 1, 2013

Self-directed, multi-disciplinary artists’ residencies will be offered from May through November 2013. Most sessions are 4-weeks in duration and are offered to those working in the Visual Arts, Music Composition/Sound Sculpture, Architecture, Creative Writing, Moving Image and Landscape/Garden Design. There is also a special Environmental Art Program in 2013.

Except for the $30 application fee, the residency is offered at no cost to accepted artists and includes comfortable private living quarters, a private studio and meal program. International applicants are welcome. To defray the cost of travel, four $750 grants will be awarded in 2013 to non-North American artists.

For details and to apply, visit http://www.i-park.org/residency-programs/2013-residency-program. Contact: iparkapplications@gmail.com or 860-873-2468.

 

 

The Sun behind the Clouds

This post comes to you from Cultura21

A meditation about the sky by Ettore Favini and He-He

Parco Arte Vivente´s (PAV) 2012 art program, dedicated to the Ethos of the living,  is being concluded with the dual-person show The Sun behind the Cloudsby Ettore Favini and the Anglo-German duo He-He(Helen Evans, UK and Heiko Hansen, D).

The exhibition, curated by Claudio Cravero, proposes a new vision of the sun (Favini) and the clouds (He-He), two natural phenomena explored as issues of a both aesthetic and ethical meditation, but also acting on the stage of a even more careless relationship between man and world.

From the 31th October 2012 till the 13th January 2013 the different artworks and installations can be seen at the living art park in Turin, Italy.

For more information on PAV and the exhibition:http://www.parcoartevivente.it/pav/index.php?lingua_sito=2

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Down to Earth at the Schuylkill Center

My current curatorial project Down to Earth: Artists Create Edible Landscapes is underway at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education (SCEE) in Philadelphia, a show with 6 artists or artist teams, each creating a work about sustainable agriculture. The show takes place at a section of SCEE’s 3oo-plus acre site called Brolo Farm, complete with an abandoned farm house, barn, and farm fields that have not been actively used for decades. The overall site of the Schuylkill Center is the largest privately-owned open space area within the city limits of Philadelphia – featuring a variety of habitats including woodlands, meadows, five teaching ponds and wetlands. In addition, there are four miles of hiking trails and 7 sculpture/shelters from a current exhibition titled Gimme Shelter, commissioned by SCEE’s environmental art program.

The artists in Down to Earth are Joan Bankemper (NYC) who is creating a new version of her Medicinal Herb Garden, a large-scale garden planted in the form of an archaic feminine figure; Knox Cummin (Phila., PA) is building a rain water collection sculpture which contains a “room” garden by Ann Rosenthal and Steffi Domike (Pittsburgh, PA) titled An American Roots Garden, planted with herbs and vegetable indigenous to Native Americans such as squash, corn and beans; Simon Draper and the Habitat For Artists Collective including Todd Sargood and E Odin Cathcart (Hudson Valley, NY) have begun work on Drawn from the Garden, an art studio, potting shed, and 7 raised bed gardens, 2 of which local artists and school groups have been invited to adopt. Stacy Levy (Spring Mills, PA) will create a work titled Kept Out, a deer exclosure built partially in woodlands and partially in fields as an experiment of sorts to see what will grow when the deer are absent. Last but not least is Susan Steinman’s (S.F., CA) Urban Defense, a permaculture apple orchard housed within a built structure based on the pentagon form that the seeds make when you look inside a sliced apple.

I spent 5 days at the site last week, helping the artists get started, it was warm and sunny but low humidity, unusual for Philly but great working conditions. I’m pleased to see these projects start to take shape after several months of research on the part of the artists and discussion and planning with myself and the SCEE staff. The maintenance requirements of these living artworks after the planting (watering, weeding and eventual harvesting) are not to be underestimated. Ann and Steffi’s American Roots, will benefit from the rainwater being collected above and a hose system running through the beds, but the watering for the other gardens has not been completely resolved other than running a long hose from the farm house to the fields.

Creating “gardens as art” requires lots of advance planning, time in the field with the appropriate tools, ammending the existing soil, tons of compost – and plain old hard labor. Isn’t that always the case working outdoors? Real farmers deserve our utmost respect and this show aims to draw connections between art (culture) and working the land (cultivation). In conjunction with this exhibition The Schuylkill Center will soon be selling fresh produce from it’s own “Market Garden”. They have partnered with Urban Girls Produce (UGP) to begin growing a variety of organic fruits and vegetables, dedicating 1 ½ acres of their site for food production. UGB will plant, tend, and harvest all season to bring fresh produce to the Philadelphia market as well as having a weekly produce stand at Brolo Farm near the artists’ sites.

The rewards of presenting Down to Earth will be great as the artist’s gardens start growing (opening September 12th) and especially when we enjoy a harvest meal with the public on October 25th.

Go to EcoArtSpace