Art Culture

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS featuring SOLAR ART

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Michigan’s [USA] Great Lakes Bay Region located approximately 90 minutes north of Detroit including five main cities: Bay City, Frankenmuth, Midland, Mt. Pleasant and Saginaw will be hosting a month-long celebration of art, culture and science in October 2013 called Fall In… Art and Sol.

SOLAR ART is any work of art that incorporates solar technology to harness the power of the sun to affect its design. Solar Art combines Design + Technology + Environmental Education.

The celebration will feature the world’s first major solar art exhibition. The exhibition will be unique in combining the display of works of international and national designers, a competition open to everyone, and an educational initiative involving approximately 1,000 students from throughout the region. We are very excited to show the results of these three initiatives together during October.

You can download the Competition’s Trifold below with details on honorarium, selection criteria, exhibition details and competition dates.

Please contact us if you have any further questions. We take this opportunity to encourage you and your friends to participate.

PLEASE, SHARE THIS OPEN CALL ANNOUNCEMENT!!!

LINKS:
Festival’s website: http://fallin-glbr.com/
Exhibition: http://fallin-glbr.com/solar-art/solar-artist/
Educational Initiative: http://fallin-glbr.com/solar-art/educational-workshops/
Competition: http://fallin-glbr.com/open-call-for-proposals/

AGENTS OF CHANGE AND ECOLOGICAL CITIZENSHIP – new summer school programme from 10 to 22 July 2011

This two week workshop:

  • provides an opportunity to explore the many different ways and levels on which we can be or become better `agents of change´ and how we can deepen our understanding of ecological citizenship
  • provides a form for exploring the importance of imagination in transformative work
  • enables participants to  develop forms of creative cultural action that relate directly to each of our own life-work situations

The workshop is embedded in the exploratory practices and research of the Social Sculpture Research Unit and informed by its network of active members and associates. In this sense it also provides an introduction to social sculpture and its role in bringing about a viable word.

The program me is led by artist Shelley Sacks, head of the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes University, and Dr. Hildegard Kurt from and. Institute for Art, Culture and Sustainability in Berlin.

Please enrol as soon as possible. Places are limited.

Über Lebenskunst. Initiative for Culture and Sustainability

The “Über Lebenskunst” project is turning the city of Berlin into a showcase for initiatives that bring together culture and sustainability and examine new models for action.

Whether neighborhood gardens, urban beekeepers, carrot mobs, Wiki woods, sewing cafés or climate pirates on the Berlin’s Spree River – around the world, new forms of ecologically sustainable living models are being put to the test.
The Call for Future is directed at everyone who wants to come up with ideas both in and for Berlin. We are looking for art projects and social initiatives conceived to go beyond what we think is possible. That make the impossible a reality. The art of sustainable living in the 21st century needs not only global expertise, it needs the dedication and the innovative spirit of local initiatives.

Application deadine: May 24, 2010

“Everyone’s a part” – the trailer for the Call for Future.

See the movie in large scale

HOW TO BECOME AN ARTIST FOR SUSTAINABLE LIVING

It’s easy. Please fill out our form (making sure it’s legible) and submit it in either German or English by May 24, 2010.

Please download the form here:

DeutschEnglishFrançaisSrpski/Hrvatski/Bosanski |  PolskiEspañolTürkçeTiêng Viêt

In a two-phase selection process, applicants who are selected in the initial round will be asked to submit supplementary material (business plan, information about relevant previous projects, project planning, etc.) at the beginning of June 2010. An international jury made up of representatives from the realms of art, culture, media, politics, science and civil society will confer on which projects should receive funding by the the end of June 2010. The successful participants will be invited to present their projects at a kick-off workshop September 7-9 at the House of World Cultures in Berlin. The chosen projects will be given conceptual and financial support up through the theme festival to be held in June 2011.

How to submit your application
The application deadline is May 24, 2010 (postmark date/date of e-mail)
# by e-mail to call@ueber-lebenskunst.org
# by mail to

House of World Cultures
The “Über Lebenskunst” project
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin

… or submit your application in person at the reception.

The House of World Cultures at

Google Maps

If you have questions about the Call for Future, you can contact the Über Lebenskunst team.

Just send an e-mail to Info@ueber-lebenskunst.org or call us:

Mon-Fri from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Tel. 030 397 872-20
FAQ

Frequently asked questions about the Call For Future

Application

1. Who can apply?
Anyone can apply. Individuals, groups, families, residential communities, citizens’ initiatives, associations or organizations from the realms of art, culture, media, architecture and urban development, science and research. Applicants who are NOT residents of Berlin have to work together with a local partner. Because the idea is to focus on model artistic projects and social initiatives that build on models from elsewhere both in and for Berlin, we are expressly seeking these types of partnerships.

2. Which application documents have to be submitted?
For the pre-selection process, it is sufficient to submit the form (in German or English) which you have personally filled out and signed. Supplementary materials such as drawing, photos, manuscripts, recordings, audio files or DVDs can also be submitted. These materials will not be sent back. They will remain in the House of World Cultures.

3. How are projects selected?
As part of a two-phase selection process, a pre-selection will be made on the basis of the application documents submitted. The preselected applicants will be informed in writing at the beginning of June and asked to submit additional information about the planned project (résumé, business plan, information about previous projects, etc.). The Über Lebenskunst jury will confer on project funding at the end of June 2010.

4. What kind of funding can I expect?
In addition to financial funding of up to €20,000 per project, initiatives may receive both technical and/or conception all advice for project implementation from the Über Lebenskunst team. The participants selected by the jury will present their concepts at an (internal) kick-off workshop to be held September 7-9, 2010.
All participants that make the second round will be invited to a dinner the day before the kick-off workshop. The focus here will be getting to know each other in person and networking among the relevant actors in Berlin.

5. Can third-party resources be incorporated into the project?
Co-funding is possible.

6. Why is the call limited to Berlin?
In the 21st century, local ideas always have to be applied globally. Which is why we are primarily directing our call to local initiatives or to people who will implement their ideas and projects together with partners in Berlin, focusing (implicitly or explicitly) on global issues.
In addition, the future of humanity lies in the urban realm. Already today, more people live in urban regions than in rural regions around the world. Global urban co-existence must be conceptualized in a way that gives new value to living and is continuously reinvented. Today, people from roughly 190 different countries live together in Berlin. This is just one more reason that Berlin is a model city for ecologically sustainable living models for the 21st century.

via Über Lebenskunst. Initiative for Culture and Sustainability.

Fallen Fruit: SHOW US HOW YOU EAT

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1EVMWpO8VA

Fallen Fruit introduces Show Us How You Eat, a participatory online video project, 2010, and is seeking your videos of eating, up to 60 seconds in length.

Though there are endless images of food in art, and even still images of food in peoples mouths, we realize there is very little documentation of people actually eating. In Show Us How You Eat we solicit participants around the world on YouTube to send us one-minute clips of them eating not preparing, cutting, or cooking, but actually eating, chewing and swallowing food. These clips are combined into an endless stream of smiling mastication, a meditation on the act of eating that connects each and every one of us.

A selection of the videos submitted to Show Us How You Eat will be included in an exhibition, Fallen Fruit Presents The Fruit of LACMA (June 27-November 7, 2010), as part of EATLACMA, a year-long investigation into food, art, culture and politics.

HOW TO ENTER

Contact information: In order for your work to be considered please include your name and e-mail address with your entry.

Deadline: This is an ongoing project, but in order to be considered for inclusion in the Fallen Fruit Presents the Fruits of LACMA exhibition, submit your entry before May 31.

MORE INFO HERE: YouTube – SHOW US HOW YOU EAT.

Weimar Art and Sustainability Summer School « Sustainability and Contemporary Art

Learn about the Beuysian school of art and sustainability on this progressive summer course.

ART AND SUSTAINABILITY – new Summer School program in English within theInternational Weimar Summer Courses from 27 June – 10 July 2010.
This 12 day `theory-practice´ program runs annually in the summer. It actively engages participants in an introductory exploration of social sculpture and aesthetic questions relevant to the shaping of an ecological and socially just future. It looks back to Goethe, Schiller, the Bauhaus and Joseph Beuys and forward to developing new forms of social sculpture / connective practive appropriate to the challenges of the 21st century.
The program is led by artist Shelley Sacks, head of the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes University, and Dr. Hildegard Kurt from and. Institute for Art, Culture and Sustainability in Berlin.
Enrolment closes on 30 April 2010. Please enrol as soon as possible. Places are limited.

via Weimar Art and Sustainability Summer School « Sustainability and Contemporary Art.

ART AND SUSTAINABILITY – New summer school program in English

ART AND SUSTAINABILITY – new Summer School program in English within the International Weimar Summer Courses from 27 June – 10 July 2010.

From Goethe and Schiller through the Bauhaus to Social Sculpture. Forum for Creative Action: The Shaping of a Humane World as an Aesthetic Challenge

This 12 day `theory-practice´ program runs annually in the summer. It actively engages participants in an introductory exploration of social sculpture and aesthetic questions relevant to the shaping of an ecological and socially just future. It looks back to Goethe, Schiller, the Bauhaus and Joseph Beuys and forward to developing new forms of social sculpture / connective practive appropriate to the challenges of the 21st century.

The program is led by artist Shelley Sacks, head of the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes University, and Dr. Hildegard Kurt from and. Institute for Art, Culture and Sustainability in Berlin.

Enrolment closes on 30 April 2010. Please enrol as soon as possible. Places are limited.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Dr. Hildegard Kurt
und. Institut für Kunst, Kultur und Zukunftsfähigkeit e.V. (und.Institut)
(and. Institute for Art, Culture and Sustainability)
Leitung Büro Berlin / Head Berlin Office
Koburger Str. 3
D – 10825 Berlin
Tel. +49 (0) 30 782 74 12
Fax + 49 (0) 30 78 71 26 95
www.und-institut.de
www.hildegard-kurt.de
www.wachsende-skulptur-lueneburg.de

Fallen Fruit Presents EAT LACMA

February–November 2010

EAT LACMA is a year-long investigation into food, art, culture and politics. Fusing the richness of LACMA’s permanent collection with the ephemerality of food and the natural growth cycle, EAT LACMA’s projects consider food as a common ground that explores the social role of art and ritual in community and human relationships. EAT LACMA unfolds seasonally, with artist’s gardens planted and harvested on the museum campus, hands-on public events, and a concurrent exhibition, Fallen Fruit Presents The Fruit of LACMA (June 27-November 7, 2010). It culminates in a day-long event (November 7, 2010) in which over fifty artists and collectives will activate, intervene, and re-imagine the entire museum’s campus and galleries. EAT LACMA is curated by Fallen Fruit—David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young—and LACMA curator Michele Urton.

Go to EcoLOGIC LA

Art rationing: the culture of less

There is talk of rationing in the air. Hilary Benn, Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural affairs has done the maths and warns that population growth and climate change will affect our future food security. Amongst the green left, there’s a nostalgic enthusiasm for this kind of wartime frugality. A rush of books is digging up techniques of how the wartime generation coped with shortage.

After decades of plenty, we are coming to believe we are overburdened by consumption. I’m sure a lot of the world would find this more than a little ironic, but let’s not knock it. A culture of less would be a good thing.

But I started wondering whether it’s not just food and goods we should be thinking about having less of. What if the culture of less were to mean less culture as well? I remember listening to a talk by director Mike Figgis a couple of years ago in which he likened cultural over-production to global warming. The inventions of photography, then magnetic tape and now digitisation means that all culture is now permanent. Nothing is thrown away. New culture constantly pours into the lake at an ever increasing rate, but the lake is now dammed. “Is there too much culture?” asked Figgis. It was an idea that created a few ripples at the time.

If artists are suggesting we could live with less, should we also be living with less art? What if we had cultural rationing books. You might only be allowed five CDs a year, five books, two exhibitions, four films, one orchestral concert and two gigs. Would that make you choose what you consumed more carefully? What would you cut out? And (though the numbers of artists thrown on the dole queue would be huge) would the experience you took away from each encounter stamp itself a little deeper on your mind?

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology