Open Calls

International Award Celebrates a Greener Edinburgh Fringe

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Applications are now open for the 2014 Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, celebrating the greenest and most sustainable shows on the Edinburgh Fringe.

This project, a partnership between Creative Carbon Scotland and the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, rewards shows which engage their audiences with sustainability, take responsibility for their environmental impacts, and think big about how the arts can help to grow a sustainable world.

Applications are open from February 19th to July 18th, with a shortlist announced in The List on July 30th, and the winner announced in a ceremony at Fringe Central on August 22nd.

“We believe artists and cultural organisations are uniquely placed to address the challenges brought on by climate change,” says Ben Twist, Director of Creative Carbon Scotland.

“This major award celebrates and publicises their innovative work during the Festival Fringe.”

The award for Sustainable Production on the Fringe was first launched in 2010 at the Hollywood Fringe and Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

“We see the arts as the best driver of sustainable societies and it’s not just our opinion: data shows that performance promotes positive environmental, social, and economic impacts,” says Ian Garrett, Director of the CSPA.

“The fringe model provides an ideal platform to start working with sustainable ideas through all of the freedoms and restrictions the festival allows!”

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of cultural organisations using the arts to help shape a sustainable Scotland.

The Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts is in the Arts is a Think Tank for Sustainability in the Arts and Culture.

Shows can apply now at http://www.sustainablepractice.org/fringe/

Previous Edinburgh recipients include: The Pantry Shelf (2010), a satirical comedy that takes place in any ordinary pantry shelf, produced by Team M&M at Sweet Grassmarket; Allotment (2011) by Jules Horne and directed by Kate Nelson, produced by Nutshell Productions at the Inverleith Allotments in co-production with Assembly; The Man Who Planted Trees (2012) adapted from Jean Giono’s story by Ailie Cohen, Richard Medrington, Rick Conte and directed by Ailie Cohen, produced by the Edinburgh’s Puppet State Theatre; and How to Occupy an Oil Rig (2013), by Daniel Bye and Company, produced at Northern Stage. Awardees have gone on to future success on the Fringe and presentations around the world including as close as Cardiff for World Stage Design, and as far as New Zealand and all across the US and Canada.

Contact:

Ben Twist, Director, Creative Carbon Scotland
ben@creativecarbonscotland.com
0131 529 7909
www.creativecarbonscotland.com

www.sustainablepractice.org/fringe/

Image Credit: EFF

The post International Award Celebrates a Greener Edinburgh Fringe appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Arts and Ecology: emerging uses for digital technologies

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Digital Creativity is a journal devoted to the intersection of the creative arts and digital technology. Concerned with both the practical and the theoretical, Digital Creativity offers a unique forum to researchers and practitioners involved in the interdisciplinary nature of making or using digital media in creative contexts. They include such disciplines as fine art, graphic design, illustration, photography,
printmaking, sculpture, 3D design, interaction design, product design, textile and fashion design, film-making, animation, games design, music, dance, drama, creative writing, poetry, interior design, architecture, and urban design.

Proposal for a special issue of Digital Creativity Vol 25 No 4

Call for papers

In this special issue, they explore the emergent practice known broadly as ‘Arts & Ecology’, a set of practices in which arts practice engages with the natural world.
Practice might be issues-based or activist in nature, or may simply have a desire to reflect upon or engage directly with nature or ecology. This special issue of the journal seeks writers, theorists, practitioners, and other researchers who can reflect on this practice and on emerging and emergent uses of digital technologies within it. Can it be said that there is a new awareness of and a newly-emergent practice of nature writing? Are ecological artists using technologies in different ways? Do
ecological pressure impact upon how we use, develop and fuel our technologies? Can renewable energy play a part in a technological arts practice? Are digital technologies changing the ways in which people can engage with the natural world? How are cultural practices remixing the digital world with the more-than-human and other-than-human worlds? We welcome philosophical and/or theoretical reflection as well as detailed descriptions of practice or critique.

Important dates:
Abstracts are due on May 1, 2014
Short/long papers are due on: July 10, 2014
Final, revised papers are due on: August 23, 2014
Expected publication: November, 2014

More Info.

———-

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

- Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
- Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
- Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
- Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Powered by WPeMatico

Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The project provides a unique opportunity with much of the land within Hadleigh Country Park being designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest as it is a haven for around 1,300 species of wildlife including the shrill carder bee, the emerald damselfly and the weevil hunting wasp. The local environment also supports dark-bellied Brent geese.

Public Art Online Commissions – Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity.

(Deadline was 3 March 2014)

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Residency Opp and Green Teas(e) Reflections – Creative Carbon Scotland

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Our friends and colleagues at Creative Carbon Scotland have a call out for artists to participate in a residency,

Mull is a multi-disciplinary weekend-long residency which explores the question, ‘What would it mean to be an artist working in a sustainable Scotland in 50 years’ time?’ through artistic practice and conversation. We’re looking for up to ten artists to apply their curiosity and unique skills to imagining what being an artist in a sustainable Scotland might look like in the future – what that would mean, how it would affect artistic content, what infrastructure it would require in order to function and how artists and the arts will have shaped a sustainable Scotland.  More info here.

They have also been running a programme of Green Tea(se) in Glasgow to build up the discussion about what a sustainable city and cultural sector might look like.  They’ve been blogging the outcomes of the events.  Green Teas(e) is part of a wider EU project called the Green Arts Lab Alliance. To find out more, click here.

If you want to contribute to imagining a more sustainable cultural sector, then come along and join the conversation. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Margaret Tait Residency

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The Margaret Tait Residency is an opportunity for early career artists working with film and moving image to undertake a focused period of work on Orkney.  Deadline 9am 4 April 2014. 

The Margaret Tait Residency aims to support and develop the skills of an emerging Scottish or Scotland-based artist working within film and moving image. It was developed for artists early in their career who would benefit from a focused period of development in a stimulating environment outwith their typical studio base.

The recipient of the Residency will travel to Stromness Orkney in summer 2014 and be based there for eight weeks. They will be given accommodation, studio space, artist support at Pier Arts Centre and living expenses. After the Residency, they will complete a series of mentor sessions with prominent artists, as well as film production courses as requested and required. The artist is expected to then deliver a film or film event by February 2015 for inclusion in Glasgow Film Festival’s programme.

Applications are now sought from the sector. The deadline is 9am, Friday 4 April 2014.

Selection process:

Who can apply?

  • Scottish artists or artists based in Scotland.
  • Emerging artists, early in their career (graduating in the last three to five years in a relevant course), who work in film and moving image.
  • There is no age restriction.
  • We regret that we cannot accept applications from artists who are students.

To apply, please send the following:

Timeline:

  • Eight weeks to be spent in Stromness, Orkney in summer 2014 (dates negotiable between May–September).
  • Further support and training to take place in UK between September–December, based on your needs and aims.
  • Film screening at Glasgow Film Festival, February 2015.
  • Film to tour beyond Glasgow, with assistance from GFF–from March 2015 onwards.

Deadline for nominations: 9am on Friday 4 April 2014.

2012 Margaret Tait Residency winner Sarah Forrest

The inaugural Margaret Tait Residency was supported by the Creative Scotland Creative Futures Programme, LUX and the Pier Arts Centre. The panel selected Sarah Forrest as the recipient of the Residency which took place in summer 2012 at Pier Arts Centre in Stromness Orkney for six weeks. After the Residency, Sarah completed six mentor sessions with prominent artists, as well as camera skills and sound editing courses in London and Glasgow.

Sarah Forrest’s film, that now, screened to a busy Cinema 2 audience on Friday 17 February 2013 at GFT, and was well received. Sarah then took the film back to Orkney in April 2013 for a screening at Stromness Town Hall, alongside Blue Black Permanent by Margaret Tait and has since screened at Belfast, Leeds and Rotterdam.

You can read more about Margaret Tait at LUX online.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

OPEN CALL: ARTLEAKS GAZETTE NO.2

This post comes to you from Cultura21

(An)Other Art World(s)? Imagination Beyond Fiction

The first issue of the ArtLeaks Gazette was aimed at bringing critical awareness of the challenges and obstacles of the contemporary art system. While they considered this a necessary initial step in enacting meaningful transformations of this system, ArtLeaks now feels the need to move beyond exposure and breaking the silence into ways of engagement, or what does it mean to be agents of change in the art world today?

285480_126216727472868_5264206_n

The main question that the second issue of the ArtLeaks Gazette addresses is: What are the conditions and possibilities of alternative art worlds? And because they ask about that which is yet to come, how can people engage and use their imagination, avoiding, at the same time, the traps of utopian thinking? In many ways, these questions are precisely related to the challenge of special and temporal limitations, of the continuity of building more engaged institutions, sustainable socio-political practices, something which people can come back to and extend. It seeks to bring together a host of proposals for practices, platforms, organizations and ask how people can push further beyond their being too local and temporary. One step towards this is recognizing the international character of the resistance, calling for a different way of making a critical art, of running institutions and of doing politics as people translate their aspirations and practices into a new cycle of struggles.

They welcome contributions in a variety of narrative  forms, from articles, commentaries, and glossary entries, to posters, drawings and films. The deadline for entries is the 31st of March 2014. Contributions should be delivered in English or as an exemption in any language after negotiations with the editorial council. The editorial council of ArtLeaks takes responsibility of communicating with all authors during the editorial process.

Please contact them with any questions, comments and submit materials to: artsleaks [at] gmail [dot] com.

They will publish all contributions delivered to them in a separate section. However, they take full responsibility in composing an issue of the gazette in the way they feel it should be done.

More Information

———-

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

- Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
- Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
- Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
- Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Powered by WPeMatico

Grant to provide, promote or publicise health

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Originally posted on CHRIS FREMANTLE:

Scottish Government grant funding to national voluntary organisations which provide, promote or publicise health or health-related services. The list of previous grants includes several arts organisations as well as a number working in the environment.

National Voluntary Organisations 16b Grants

The deadline for applications is Friday February 21, 2014.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Mull – Weekend Residency, thinking about Art & Sustainability

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Artist Residency Callout

Mull is a multi-disciplinary weekend-long residency which explores the question, ‘What would it mean to be an artist working in a sustainable Scotland in 50 years’ time?’ through artistic practice and conversation. We’re looking for up to ten artists to apply their curiosity and unique skills to imagining what being an artist in a sustainable Scotland might look like in the future – what that would mean, how it would affect artistic content, what infrastructure it would require in order to function and how artists and the arts will have shaped a sustainable Scotland.  Creative Carbon Scotland is partnering with Comar on the beautiful Isle of Mull to mull over these complex questions with artists who may or may not have previously thought about environmental sustainability in relation to their work.

1038233_16b89ac2

Background and context

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe artists and cultural organisations have a significant role to play in envisioning, inspiring and influencing a more sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

Over the past year Creative Carbon Scotland has initiated a number of artistically-led projects including the CO2 Edenburgh exhibition in partnership with Edinburgh Art Festival; a workshop with Imaginate and children’s theatre makers imagining and developing a sustainable children’s theatre network; and more recently Glasgow Green Teas(e).

Building on this, Mull will invite artists to imagine what it would mean to marry creativity and environmental sustainability in their practice. The weekend will be led by facilitators – composer Dave Fennessy and producer Suzy Glass – but will also be steered by those taking part, recognising the relatively untrodden grounds of the questions we’re asking.

The residency has a number of objectives:

  • To provide artists who may or may not have previously thought about environmental sustainability in their practice with the space and stimuli to consider how it might drive new ways of working;
  • To create a ‘greenprint’ of the skills and ways of working that might constitute a sustainable artistic practice;
  • To use this ‘greenprint’ as the starting point for thinking about how Creative Carbon Scotland and the cultural sector can best support and work with artists in this capacity;
  • To nurture a creative network which embeds environmental sustainability at its core.

What will it involve?

Mull takes the disrupted and changing climate as the starting point for thinking about how artists might do things differently. It asks how the world might look in 50 years’ time and what role artists might play in the changes to come as well as what unique skills they can bring to this new context. Considering approaches to making art, as well the actual content and the infrastructure it lives within, we’ll work to imagine the future and understand the necessary steps towards it to stimulate some initial responses to these questions.  By the end of the weekend we’ll open up our ‘greenprint’ and ideas to a wider public discussion.

What we’re looking for

We’re looking for inquisitive artists who can bring big ideas to a group setting and who are keen to ask questions of themselves and established ways of working. The residency is open to artists from any discipline, whether or not they have previously considered environmental sustainability in their approach to working.

What to expect

Artists should expect a relatively open-format two days with facilitation by the group as well as Dave and Suzy. There may be the opportunity for some artists to lead a ‘session’ during the weekend, bringing a particular response or angle to theme of environmental sustainability and artistic practice. Artists will not be expected to develop or produce anything specific during the two days– the residency is about being thoughtful. On the final evening, we’ll open the doors to a public conversation with the opportunity for presentation of a ‘greenprint’ and further discussion.

The residency will take place from Friday 28th – Monday 31st March 2014 at Comar on Isle of Mull, leaving Edinburgh or Glasgow midday on 28th and returning early afternoon on 31st March. Participants will be paid £100 for their attendance and travel expenses from within Scotland, accommodation and catering will be covered by Creative Carbon Scotland.

Application

Please read this section carefully and make sure you send the right information with your application.

Applications should include the following information:

  • Name and contact details (including email address)
  • An outline of your experience to date (no more than 500 words) and a CV
  • Some examples of your works or links to them online or related material (for example reviews etc. if your work is not able to be distributed online)
  • A short outline of why you would like to take part and what you hope to gain from taking part
  • A short proposal of a ‘session’ you might lead during the residency  in response to the question ‘What would it mean to be an environmentally sustainable artist working in Scotland in 2050?’ or a future artwork/project which engages with this question

Please send your application to Gemma Lawrence at gemma@creativecarbonscotland.com by 9am on Monday 3rd March. 

Image: Glen More, Isle of Mull, pennyghael2 and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

The post Mull – Weekend Residency, thinking about Art & Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Holland: Conference on the future sustainability of European culture organisations

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

The conference ‘The Future Is Not What It Used To Be’ aims to develop a range of practical strategies and tactics for the future sustainability of European culture organisations.

futureisnotwhatitused

‘The Future Is Not What It Used To Be’ is a three-day, interdisciplinary working conference on 2-4 April 2014, presented by Trans Europe Halles, Melkweg and P60, taking place in Amsterdam and Amstelveen, The Netherlands.

Key issues and questions will form the basis for in-depth discussions, workshops and presentations at the conference. For instance, one of the conference-workshops entitled ‘Big Change – Towards a Sustainable Cultural Organisation’ will be a hands-on workshop about introducing sustainable methods into a cultural centre.

The host organisation P60 and its adjacent cultural organisations will be used as examples. By identifying areas requiring improvement, diagnostics and developing strategies, this workshop builds on the Sustainability Charter and the expertise developed by Trans Europe Halles.

The idea of the conference is to explore how cultural organisations can meet the needs of the future: What are the prospects are cultural organisations operating in a future of reduced resources and a changing European society?

‘The Future Is Not What It Used To Be’ is for anyone employed in or connected to the cultural sector. It will also offer the opportunity for policy makers and politicians to engage in discussions with culture practitioners on work-related topics and issues.

‘The Future Is Not What It Used To Be’ is organised in partnership with Culture Action Europe, European Cultural Foundation, GALA, IETM, Kunsten ’92, On The Move, Res Artis, Trans Artists and VNPF.

Until 14 February 2014, registration as an early bird with a reduced price will be available. More information on the programme will be available on the conference website from 7 February. 

» www.tehfuture.net

———-

Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.

Go toThis post comes to you from Culture|Futures

Powered by WPeMatico

ESA Arts 2014. Arts and its contexts: cross-disciplinary dialogue

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The 8th midterm Conference of the European Research Network Sociology of the Arts will take place at „Babes-Bolyai” University in Cluj-Napoca from 4 to 6 September 2014, and will be conducted in English. The general theme of the conference is Art and its contexts: cross-disciplinary dialogue.

The Research Network Sociology of the Arts aims to provide the sociological context for understanding the multifaceted and interwoven social aspects which characterize the art worlds. A key aim of this conference is to promote collaboration and scholarly exchange between scholars of the arts, to support the presentation of new research projects and to offer inspiration for the further development of sociology of the arts; in other words sociological approaches to art and their tense but promising relations with other approaches by cultural studies, art history, philosophy and aesthetics.

Therefore, researchers from all social sciences disciplines, philosophy and humanities, as well as PhD students and artists who are interested in inter- and trans-disciplinary dialogue are welcome to participate in this conference and create special sessions. Papers on this theme are invited, with the expectation that they may include a broad nexus of sub-issues around alternative approaches to art and its contexts, the social and the aesthetic, willing to cross the divide between sociology and aesthetics. Proposal deadline will be Febuary 15th, 2014.

The programme will be thematically broad and open for presentations to all core areas of arts sociology.

Call for proposals.

Website and general information.

———-

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

- Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
- Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
- Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
- Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

Powered by WPeMatico