Open Calls

Call for Applications: The Arctic Circle 2020

he Arctic Circle 2020 seeks applications from international contemporary artists of all disciplines, scientists, architects, educators and innovators alike.

Application guidelines for The Arctic Circle 2020 programming are now available for download from our website. Please visit: www.thearcticcircle.org and click on Apply.

We look forward to hearing from you and learning more about your work, 
The Arctic Circle

This call is issued November 15th, 2019. The application deadline is January 15th, 2020


The Arctic Circle is a nexus where art intersects science, architecture, and activism–an incubator for thought and experimentation for artists and innovators who seek out areas of collaboration to engage in the central issues of our time.


For complete listings of News & Events please visit: The Arctic Circle, www.thearcticcircle.org

Wassaic Project 2020 Summer Residency FAMILY Open Call

Application opens: October 21, 2019

Deadline: December 4, 2019, midnight

Residencies are 1–8 weeks in length and applicants accepted through this program are considered full participants of the Wassaic Project Artist Residency Program.

Residents are selected by a review committee composed of the Wassaic Project Co-Directors, the Residency Director, and professionals in the field. Successful residents will be selected based on the quality of their work, commitment to their practice, and their ability to contribute to the community at large.

The Wassaic Project broadly defines “Family” as comprised of a group of more than one individual where there is an in-house, and dependent, caregiving relationship. The Wassaic Project recognizes that artists who have caregiving relationships, as providers or recipients, often opt-out of peer community building for practical reasons. The Wassaic Project aims to provide family accommodations which increase access to our residency program.

Examples of caregiving may include, but are not limited to:
Parent/Child (parent is caregiver)
Child/Parent (child is caregiver)
Partner/Partner (where one partner is a supportive caregiver of other and cohabitation is required for caregiving)
A recipient of caregiving.
A self-selection into this application for separate and additional housing space by identifying as a Family applicant.

Residents are selected by a review committee composed of professionals in their field, the Wassaic Project Co-Directors and Residency Director. Artists and writers will be selected based on the quality of their work, commitment to their practice, and ability to interact positively with the community at large.

The Wassaic Project cultivates and supports a community for emerging and professional contemporary artists, writers and other creatives. Housed in historic, landmark buildings, the residency program offers between nine and thirteen artists each month the opportunity to live and work in the heart of a rural community. The Wassaic Project seeks artists working in a diverse range of media who want to produce, explore, challenge, and expand on their current art-making practices, while participating in a community-based arts organization. The Wassaic Project welcomes and values participants of all identities and backgrounds.

STUDIOS + FACILITIES + ACCOMMODATIONS
Residents will receive an adaptable raw studio space in a historic livestock barn. All studios are roughly 200-300 square feet. Artists will have 24 hour access to their studio and accommodations which include a private residence with three bedrooms, living room, kitchen, and two full baths. Residents also have access to workshop facilities as well as the potential for expansion of workshop space and the possibility of working outside. The residency’s workshop facilities include a Wood Shop, Print Shop (silkscreen studio) and a kiln. 

PROGRAMMING
Two to three times a month, artists-in-residence are invited to sign up for one-on-one studio visits with Visiting Artists/Critics. Our embedded critics – Ghost of a Dream – also make group studio visits each month, along with our Residency Director and additional WP staff. All residents are invited to participate in a monthly evening of artist’s talks and presentations, as well as Open Studios towards the end of their residency.

FINANCIAL INFO + FELLOWSHIPS:
In an effort to serve and support emerging artists, we are able to subsidize residencies for all individual artists who do not have other forms of support. Thanks to the generous support of donors and grants, the fee for the Family artist residency is $900 per month per resident, which may be prorated. We may provide up to $300 per month in additional financial assistance based on artist need.

Our intention is for financial assistance to be given to artists for whom it would be impossible to attend without financial support. If that is not the case for you, please do not apply for assistance. Financial assistance is provided to reduce financial hardship; our allocation is not based on merit. Each year the amount of financial assistance we are able to give is determined by our budget, which fluctuates annually.

EDUCATION FELLOWSHIP:
Our expanded Education Fellowship program awards three free 2-3 month residencies in exchange for extensive participation in the Wassaic Project’s education programming, which connects the local community to contemporary artists and artistic practices. Recipients of Fall and Spring Education Fellowships will work primarily as Teaching Artists in our Wassaic X Webutuck program, which builds critical thinking and creative problem solving skills through collaborations between emerging artists and public high school students. Recipients of the Summer Education Fellowship will work as Teaching Artists and facilitators in many of our summer programs including Art Scouts, a free summer camp for K-6th graders, and Art Nest, our drop-in making space. All Education Fellows will gain extensive curriculum-building and teaching experience.

Wassaic Project
37 Furnace Bank Road
Wassaic, NY 12592

For more information about the Wassaic Project’s Summer Program:
https://www.wassaicproject.org/artists/summer-residency

How to apply:
https://www.wassaicproject.org/artists/applications

Website:
https://www.wassaicproject.org/

For more info about the Education Fellow:
https://www.wassaicproject.org/artists/education-fellowships

Contact info:
Will Hutnick
Residency Director
will@wassaicproject.org

Photo by Verónica González Mayoral

Open Call: THE WALL 2020 | Trestle Gallery

Trestle Gallery is pleased to announce a new open call opportunity for site-specific projects for The Wall. Trestle Gallery will select 4 artists (or artistic collaborators/collectives) for the 2020 calendar year to execute a site-specific drawing, painting, or installation on our 8 x 10.25 foot entrance wall at our 850 3rd Avenue location. These projects will remain on view for approximately 2 months, with an opening reception that coincides with our other gallery programming. Applications are open to all artists (NY-based or otherwise) but selected artists must be available to install and deinstall their own projects. Trestle will provide a modest stipend to help cover expenses related to the production of the work. Selected artists will be notified in the Fall of 2019. 

Trestle is committed to creating and supporting a diverse and inclusive environment for all participants. Artists of all genders, communities, abilities, and cultures help us fulfill our mission to hold a space promoting excellence for all.

Dates for The Wall 2020:

January 17 – March 8 | March 20 – May 10 | July 2 – August 30 | September 11 – November 1

Submission Guidelines:  

  • You may submit up to 5 images of your current work to provide some context for your proposal. If you have previously executed a site-specific wall work, please include it with your images.
  • Please make your proposal as detailed as possible. You may also submit up to 3 images to further illustrate/supplement your proposal.
  • Acceptable media include drawing, painting, sculpture, fiber art, ceramics, photography, and/or mixed media. Installations may extend up to 24 inches from the wall. Unfortunately we cannot accept proposals which include video, sound, or any other electronic components.
  • Images must be in .JPG or .JPEG format, 1000 pixels on longest side, titledLastnameFirstname_Title.jpg
  • CV, Statement, and Bio must be submitted in PDF form, titled: LastnameFirstName_CV.pdf; LastnameFirstName_Statement.pdf; LastnameFirstName_Bio.pdf; 
  • National and international artists are welcome to apply, but selected artists must be available to install and deinstall their own projects

[Click here to access photos, floor plans, and sketch up models of The Wall at Trestle]

Music Declares Emergency

Julie’s Bicycle has joined forces with the Music Industry to declare a climate and ecological emergency. In the last week we’ve received more than 1,000 signatures on the declaration, from those who represent a broad spectrum of the UK music community, including institutions such as:

Abbey Road Studios, AIM, the Association of Independent Festivals, Beggars Group, Believe, The BRIT School, Festival Republic, Kambe Events, Music Venue Trust, Powerful Thinking, Sony Music UK, United Talent Agency, Universal Music UK, Village Underground, Warner Music UK, Warner Chappell Music UK

plus artists such as: 
Bernard Butler, Beth Orton, Bonobo, Caribou, Carleen Anderson, Ezra Furman, Fay Milton (Savages), Floating Points, Foals, Geoff Barrow, Hot Chip, IDLES, Imelda May, Jon Hopkins, Kathleen Hanna, Maribou State, Mick Hucknall, Nadine Shah, Nitin Sawhney, Pretenders, Radiohead, Sam Fender, The Cinematic Orchestra, This Is The Kit, Tom Odell, plus hundreds of other artists and businesses.Music professionals can sign up below or you canfollow it all on social media:#MusicDeclaresEmergency.JB is also a signatory to Culture Declares Emergency, representing the broader performing and visual arts community – sign up to Culture Declares here.
Join: Music Declares Emergency

Open call for artists living in rural and remote locations

A selective membership programme for artists living rurally + interested in art + ecology.

Creating a vast global network of connected topographies and reaching to the world’s most isolated places, the Arts Territory Exchange (aTE) facilitates collaboration between artists in remote and wilderness locations such as, islands, deserts, refugee camps, small communities or for those that feel themselves to be ‘remote’ in other ways, cut off from the networks that usually sustain a practice.

Member artists are invited to exchange materials exploring ideas of territory, locality and place; documents from their postal/digital exchanges become part of an interactive living archive and evolving resource. aTE also hosts events, bringing together exchange participants and helping them to realise their collaborations in the form of exhibitions, lectures, publications, ‘face-to-face’ and virtual residencies.

The programme is particularly interested in working with artists who are or have become disconnected from the resources (such as academic institutions, audiences, debate and critique) that often stimulate practice, and in addressing the remoteness—be it due to geography, rural isolation, disability, refugee status, economic disadvantage, parenthood, displacement or disenfranchisement of any kind—that may be a barrier to the conversation and dialogue that nourishes artistic practice.

aTE promotes artists’ work and offers a number of alternative residency opportunities including their ‘Residency by Correspondence’ where artists are paired up with counterparts across the world to make and create work.

Membership applications are open until August 31st 2019 and they are reviewing applications on a rolling basis. Apply here.

Find more information on the aTE website and instagram: @artsterritoryexchange

Membership benefits include:

  • Becoming part of a world-wide network.
  • Having your work included in a permanent collection, the aTE Archive.
  • Automatic inclusion in our ‘Residency by Correspondence’ Programme (with entitlement to re-pairing as and when necessary).
  • The opportunity to have your work selected by interesting independent curators as part of a rolling exhibitions schedule.
  • Opportunity to be included in aTE publications.
  • Opportunity to apply for ‘face to face’ subsidised residency programmes
  • Opportunity to apply for travel and work development funds as and when they are available.
  • An artist profile on our website with links to your website/social media.
  • Promotion of your work in the form of blog articles and social media posts (in consultation with you).

Contact Gudrun@artsterritoryexchange.com with any questions.

The post Open call for artists living in rural and remote locations appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Artist Opportunity – Public Art Commissions in Edinburgh

Call for artists to take part in an ambitious public art programme in partnership with Vastint.

We are working in partnership with international real estate organisation, Vastint, to deliver an ambitious public art programme as part of their building development in Fountainbridge, Edinburgh 2019/2020.

This programme will respond to the unique social and industrial heritage of the area. It will also be informed by a recent community consultation report that sets out a vision for a green public realm, promoting wellbeing, natural places to play and unwind, as well as areas for plants, trees and wildlife to flourish.

These permanent commissions will be integral to the architectural design and planning process of Vastint’s development.

Deadline for Notes of Interest
18 August 2019

For more information, please contact Sarah-Manning Shaw: programme@edinburghprintmakers.co.uk

Visit: https://www.edinburghprintmakers.co.uk/our-future-home/present/blog-article/public-art-commissions-edinburgh

The post Artist Opportunity – Public Art Commissions in Edinburgh appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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COAL Prize 2019 – Call for entries open till 9 September

For its tenth edition in 2019 the COAL Prize will, in collaboration with the Platform on Disaster Displacement and DISPLACEMENT: Uncertain Journeys, tackle an essential subject:  displacement related to disasters and climate change.

Since 2009, an estimated one person per second has been displaced following sudden-onset disasters. Disasters such as droughts, floods, earthquakes and tsunamis have left many victims without shelter, clean water and basic necessities. Meanwhile, slow changes, such as desertification and sea level rise, also force people out of their homes. Environmental factors are often intrinsically linked to the same political, economic and social factors that cause migration. Consequently, we find ourselves facing an “ordeal common to all: the ordeal of finding oneself deprived of land. […] We are discovering, more or less obscurely, that we are all in migration toward territories yet to be rediscovered and reoccupied” (Bruno Latour, Down to Earth, 2018). 

A World Bank report released in March 2018 indicates that 143 million people around the world could be displaced by 2050 as a result of these impacts if nothing is done to halt climate change. 

However, significant progress has been made in recent years to address the gap in international law for cross-border disaster-displaced persons and to improve protection of internally displaced persons (IDPs) due to disasters and climate change. The challenge lies in ensuring the political commitments made in the Global Compact for Migration, the Global Compact for Refugees, the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction, the UNFCCC Task Force on Displacement, and the Nansen Initiative Protection Agenda turn into concrete action in the areas most impacted by climate change.  

In September 2018, UN Secretary-General António Guterres delivered a passionate speech calling upon world leaders and policymakers, who for too long have “refused to listen,” to come out of denial. He emphasized that they have the power to change the game. 

Tackling the enormous challenge we face begins by making it visible. Thus the COAL association, in this special edition of the COAL Prize, invites artists from all over the world to share their testimonies and visions for a world more respectful of ecological balance and climatic justice. Through their creations, they can encourage policymakers to understand and act on the reality of displacement caused by climate change. Presented at COP25 in Chile, the COAL Prize will be present at the negotiating table to help ensure that political decisions translate into concrete changes for a shared and livable Earth. 

With the support of the Ministry of Culture and the Ministry of Ecological and Solidarity Transition and the sponsorship of the Ministry of Culture, the Museum of Hunting and Nature, the François Sommer Foundation, the Platform on Disaster Displacement and its cultural program DISPLACEMENT: Uncertain Journeys.

DOWNLOAD THE OPEN CALL

Address any questions to : CONTACT@PROJETCOAL.FR

Image credit : Alex Hartley, Nowhereisland, winning project of 2015 COAL Prize.

Opportunity: Participate in 52 Stitched Stories

A community arts project creating a postcard piece of textile art every week for a year is seeking new communities to participate.

The 52 Stitched Stories project began life on Arran but, very quickly, jumped the water to West Kilbride. Members in each community produce a postcard piece of art work for as many weeks as possible in 2019 as possible. On Arran this is limited to ‘stitched’ work but in West Kilbride all media is included. The participants have monthly meetings to share their work, processes and swap ideas. This month the two groups came together for a fascinating sharing event. The work will be exhibited in the Barony gallery in March 2020. It has already proved to be a remarkable project that is sustaining both individual practice and community bonds. Being part of something bigger has created a feeling of belonging. At sharing meetings it is obvious just how many of the pieces use recycled materials and Upcycling processes and this has been particularly rewarding.

Call for communities to participate

This is a call for new communities who would like to begin their 52 Stitched Stories journey in 2020. We are meeting with interested groups or individuals to support them in their preparation and also looking at new and innovative ways of connecting the communities involved in the project. If you would like to find out more visit our new website or email Fiona at earththreadsuk@gmail.com

The post Opportunity: Participate in 52 Stitched Stories appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for Proposals: Ecosomatics, near Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 23-25 2020

We are inviting contributions to a three-day residential symposium at the Pierce Cedar Creek Institute in Michigan (April 23rd to 25th, 2020), funded and supported by the University of Michigan (Departments of English, Dance, Theatre, National Center for Institutional Diversity, Initiative on Disability Studies, Graham Sustainability Institute and the Program in the Environment) in collaboration with the Black Earth Institute.

We are looking for:engagements with Body/World in movement, in touch and sense, in somatic play, technique, repetition and training, in relationship. We welcome full-mouthed messy matter and fleshy multispecies engagement across and beyond boundaries. We hope to shape a complex tool-set for living in a changing natural world which impacts people differently, dependent on histories of violence and their attendant environmental effects.

The symposium invites creators/critics of performance, movement, somatic training, writing, and visual/social practice related to emergent genres such as solarpunk, climate fiction, eco-arts, and interspecies dialogue, and their relationships to social justice organizing and experimental practice. The academic aims of this project make interventions into disabled futurities (Kafer, 2014), kinship networks (Haraway, 2016), and organizing (brown, 2017), and extend the discussions begun in our Movement, Somatics and Writing symposium (2010) and in the collection Somatic Engagement(Kuppers, ed., Chainlinks, 2011).

The symposium hopes to be a training ground and a research site where we figure out how participatory and artistic practices can allow us to feel things and livelinesses differently, and how we can invent new appreciation and embodiment practices for human and other eco-diversities. We will be in praxis together. Thus, we are not looking for papers, finished performances, portfolios, or readings; we plan to experiment. Come and share the excitement of your creative and critical research, and present an (indoor or outdoor) generative workshop, exercise, or technique session based on your passions. Keep in mind that our host is a nature center, environmental education center, and biological field station, and won’t have particular performance technologies. We will provide disability access (please let us know of your needs).

Deadline: August 1st (participants will be informed of acceptance by September 11th).

Selected participants have the opportunity to be published in our “Ecosomatics” issue of the Journal of the Center for Sustainable Practices in the Arts.

Participants will receive free room and board at the Institute, and up to $250 as partial reimbursement for travel expenses.

Application Process:

Please send the following to petra@umich.edu and cvfair@umich.edu:

A CV, a sample of your writing (creative, experimental, performative, or critical), and a brief statement about why and how you would like to participate. You can also send URLs etc. for performance or visual arts material.

We are looking forward to hearing from you,

Catherine Fairfield and Petra Kuppers (Symposium Directors)

Confirmed Participants:

Aimee Meredith Cox is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and African American Studies at Yale University. In all of her work, she enjoys exploring the seamlessness of dance, ethnography, pedagogy, and the the politics and poetics of writing in making community across the boundaries of institutional spaces and disciplinary mandates.

Angela Hume, assistant professor of English and creative writing at University of Minnesota, Morris, is currently at work on a critical book about poets’ and poetry’s relationship to radical women’s and LGBTQ+ health movements. Her full-length poetry book is Middle Time (Omnidawn, 2016) and a new chapbook, Meat Habitats (DoubleCross), will be out in 2019.

Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren, Ph.D., Director, Folded Paper Dance and Theatre (Hong Kong/Seattle), creates work that links heritage, performance and ecology across geographical locations. Her recent work, At the Water’s Edge (Maryland Institute College of Art) on climate change will be expanded into a set of traveling workshops and portable performances in Hong Kong and India.  A Fulbright-Nehru Scholar (2017-2018, Kerala), she is currently developing her research on Traveling Exchanges into a series of articles and performance projects as well as serving as the inaugural editor of Journal of Performance and Cultural Studies (The Centre for Performance Research and Cultural Studies in South Asia).

DJ Lee is author/editor of eight scholarly books, most recently The Land Speaks: New Voices at the Intersection of Oral and Environmental History (Oxford University Press, 2017). Her creative work has appeared in Narrative and The Los Angeles Review of Books. She is director of the NEH-funded Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project, and her creative nonfiction work about the wilderness, Remote: A Love Story, is forthcoming from Oregon State University Press.

Bronwyn Preece lives in British Columbia, where is honored to be a guest on the Traditional Territory of the Salish Peoples.  She is an improvisational, site-sensitive performance eARThist, author, editor, community-engaged applied theatre practitioner, pioneer of earthBODYment, poetic pirate, avid hiker and boundary-pushing renegade.  Her PhD was titled Performing Embodiment: Improvisational Investigations into the Intersections of Ecology and Disability.

Conference Directors:

Catherine Fairfield is a PhD candidate in English & Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She earned her BA in English at the University of Exeter. Her research interests include environmental humanities, feminist theory, and experiential education. Her dissertation explores the role of literature in how we learn to sustain, care for, and survive with our material environments. When not writing or teaching, Catherine likes to learn about the world through bird-watching and sketching her dog, Gracie.

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community performance artist, Professor of English and Women’s Studies at UM, Artistic Director of an international disability performance collective, The Olimpias, and co-director of Turtle Disco, a somatic writing studio. She is a Fellow of the Black Earth Institute (2018-2020), and a 2019/2020 Hunting Family Faculty Fellow at UM’s Institute for the Humanities, with her new book project, “Eco Soma: Speculative Performance Experiments.”

The 2019 Artists & Climate Change Incubator – New York

New York City
Monday-Friday, July 22-26, 2019
10am-5:30pm
Fee: $385
Leader: Chantal Bilodeau

Calling all artists, activists, scientists, and educators who want to engage or further their engagement with climate change through artistic practices! Join The Arctic Cycle for the third year of the Artists & Climate Change Incubator, July 22–26, 2019 in New York City. All disciplines are welcome and individuals from traditionally underrepresented populations and communities are encouraged to attend. The Incubator is an inclusive environment that supports diverse perspectives.

During this 5-day intensive, participants interact with accomplished guest speakers from fields such as environmental humanities, climate science, climate change activism, and visual and performing arts. Work sessions allow everyone to dig deep into the challenges and concerns of working at the intersection of arts and climate change such as embracing activism without sacrificing personal vision and artistic integrity, letting go of the idea of “product,” and bringing the arts to non-traditional audiences. Group exercises and discussions cover a range of topics including:

  • How to think about climate change as a systemic issue
  • How to effectively engage communities
  • How to take the arts out of traditional venues to reach underserved populations
  • How to develop collaborative projects with non-arts partners to achieve specific goals
  • How to reframe climate change narratives to energize audiences

Limited to 20 participants. 

All sessions will take place at The Lark, 311 West 43rd Street, New York, NY 10036. Availability is on a first come, first serve basis. Participants are responsible for their own travel and accommodation. For more information, visit the website or contact The Arctic Cycle at: info [at] thearcticcycle [dot] org.

The Incubator will also be offered in Alaska in May. For more info, click here.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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