Open Calls

Opportunity: Project Artist Hawick Flood Protection Scheme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

May 2016 – October 2016

Deadline for applications:  Monday 25th April 2016

Fee:  £4000

A unique opportunity has arisen for a Project Artist to work closely with the engineering and project team around the Hawick Flood Protection Scheme (HFPS) and engage communities in the development and design of proposals which can be taken forward within the scheme.   The key priority of the HFPS works is to protect the town from the effects of a ‘1 in 75’ year flood event on the River Teviot, but the works also offer opportunities to incorporate imaginative place-making proposals, including for permanent public artworks, which can be taken forward into the second phase of the HFPS.

This opportunity has been enabled through a partnership between Scottish Borders Council, CH2M (scheme engineers) and the Creative Arts Business Network (CABN), and has already involved initial engagement with community groups around potential proposals.

More information is available on the CABN website – http://www.cabn.info/opportunities/project-artist-hawick-flood-protection-scheme.html


Image: http://www.oldemaps.co.uk/Hawick-map.htm

The post Opportunity: Project Artist Hawick Flood Protection Scheme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Job: Sustainability Coordinator at the School of Art Institute of Chicago

Duties

1. Competition Coordination – Develop, plan, coordinate and implement activities including, but not limited to, Recyclemania, other competitions and programs related to sustainability at SAIC. Both the manner in which these activities are organized and the nature of their content should be geared towards achieving buy-in and habit transformation from student, faculty and staff community members.

2. Project Management and Policy Development – Encourage and facilitate sustainability programs initiated by student, faculty and staff community members. Foster and coordinate new ideas and concepts for sustainability programming themes and identify materials and resources to supplement, expand or replace existing sustainability programming.

3. Committee Development – Assist Sustainable SAIC (Committee) in defining goals, performance metrics and a long range plan for sustainability at SAIC. Monitor and evaluate program effectiveness, document performance trends, and recommend and implement modifications to improve program effectiveness.

4. Department Liaison – Represent SAIC’s sustainability programs to the University; maintain liaison with groups, programs, offices and departments at SAIC to achieve sustainability objectives; serve on Sustainable SAIC committee.

5. Reporting and PlanningWork with community stakeholders to submit SAIC’s annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions Report, as part of the schools Carbon Commitment, as well as compiling information for Chicago’s Energy Benchmarking Ordinance. Collect and track energy data for such reports. Lead the SAIC community in developing a Climate Action Plan as well as AASHE STARS. Coordinate efforts to establish and report on a Resilience Commitment. Create process for updating plans and reports on annual basis.

6. Department Programs – Work with Facilities Services to maximize potential of waste diversion programs – recycling and composting.  Expand services where necessary. Initiate campaign to rework signage for programs.

7. Accounting and Budget Tracking – Assist in the preparation of budgets and grants; monitor, verify and reconcile expenditure of budgeted funds as appropriate.

Perform other related duties incidental to the work described herein.

  • Experience working in higher education
  • Bachelor degree in art or sustainability related field preferred.
  • Experience in program administration and knowledge of the SAIC community necessary to plan, coordinate and implement a variety of program activities and events across schools and departments.
  • Excellent analytical, communication and organization skills; an ability to self-motivate, multi-task and to work in a fast-paced environment; to work under deadlines; and the ability to work closely with students, faculty and administrators from various schools and central administration.

The position is full time M-F. Located in SAIC.

Application Time Out Warning

The Art Institute of Chicago requires all applicants to complete an online application to be considered for employment. 60 minutes are allotted for applicants to complete the employment application. The application will automatically time out after 60 minutes. If you are unable to submit the completed application at this time, please choose the “Save for Later” option to avoid losing the information you have entered so far.

Closing Statement

The Art Institute of Chicago is an equal opportunity, equal access employer fully committed to achieving a diverse and inclusive workplace.

You can find the original post by CLICKING HERE

CLIMARTE SPECIAL EVENT (VIC): POSTER PROJECT

CLIMARTE has commissioned eleven Australian artiststo design posters that engage the community on climate change action, and convey the strength, optimism, and urgency we need to move to a clean, renewable energy future.

Artists Angela Brennan, Chris Bond, Jon Campbell, Kate Daw, Katherine Hattam, Siri Hayes, Martin King, Gabrielle de Vietri & Will Foster, Thornton Walker, Miles Howard-Wilks have created posters that speak from the heart.

Posters will be displayed in an exhibition at the LAB-14 Gallery at the Carlton Connect Initiative University of Melbourne, as well as on poster sites throughout Melbourne.

CLIMARTE would like to thank the City of Melbourne, Purves Environmental Fund, the Connect Initiative, and Plakkit for their generous support of the CLIMARTE Poster Project 2016.

          

Event
Poster Project Exhibition

Exhibition Dates
5th – 28th May 2016

Opening Night
Thursday 5th May 2016
6:00pm

Venue
The University of Melbourne
LAB-14 Gallery at
the Carlton Connect Initiative
700 Swanston Street, Carlton

Stay tuned for more!

Call for Papers: Art and Political Ecology

The upcoming issue of Seismopolite Journal of Art and Politics will discuss art’s relationship with political ecology: What role does art have to play – if any – under the precariously situated human and environmental consequences of neoliberalism and its political geography? Which potentials can be found in locally situated artistic discourses and re-imaginations of political ecology, for influencing global discourses on climate change? How can the dialogue between culturally and historically different ecological imaginaries and eco-philosophical traditions be significant in an era marked by unprecedented threats to the environment?

Contributors from diverse disciplines are invited to submit essays, reviews or interviews that address the theme ‘Art and Political Ecology’, through a high variety of possible angles.

Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Artistic strategies as forms of eco-activism.
  • Eco-activist, artistic platforms for cooperation.
  • Experimental formats of political ecology: artist/ research residencies, cross-disciplinary fieldwork.
  • Cooperative projects in political ecology between artists and researchers from diverse scientific fields.
  • Eco-poetics and eco-aesthetics, across all art forms.
  • Artistic eco-activism in response to restrictions to the freedom of expression.
  • Indigenous ecological imaginaries in art.
  • Ecopoetics and the political ecology of ‘space’ and ‘place’ in art.
  • Ecological imaginaries and eco-philosophical traditions in a cross-cultural and historical perspective.
  • Potentials and disadvantages related to the integration of eco-activism in the global contemporary art scene.
  • Critical artistic thinking on eco-aesthetics/ eco-activism in relation to neoliberal geopolitics.

Please send your proposal (abstract or draft), a brief bio and samples of earlier work to submissions@seismopolite.com  within April 8, 2016. Submission deadline, final text: April 29, 2016.

www.seismopolite.com

Back issues: http://seismopolite.com/artandpolitics

Thank you very much, and all the best,
Paal Andreas Bøe
Editor-in-Chief

www.seismopolite.com
paal.andreas.boe@seismopolite.com

Short Course – Transcribing Landscape – Portraits and Tales

From our Friends at Schumacher College / https://www.schumachercollege.org.uk/courses/short-courses/transcribing-landscape-portraits-and-tales

With Fiona Benson, Richard Povall and special guestartist – Garry Fabian Miller

Join us for this residential week as we explore our relationship with landscape; part of Schumacher College’s Art and Ecology Programme.  Transcribing Landscape is convened by poet Fiona Benson and artist-researcher Richard Povall. Our special guest is the renowned photographic artist Garry Fabian Miller (link is external).

‘Garry Fabian Miller is one of the most progressive figures in fine art photography. Born in 1957, he has made exclusively ‘camera-less’ photographs since the mid 1980s. He works in the darkroom, shining light through coloured glass vessels and over cut-paper shapes to create forms that record directly onto photographic paper. These rudimentary methods recall the earliest days of photography, when the effects of light on sensitised paper seemed magical.’ – Martin Barnes (link is external) (Curator of Photography at the V&A)

How do we mark the world around us, and how does it mark us? The narrative of landscape exposes how we feel about our planet, how we act in it, how we care for it, how it moves us. Deeper forms of connection to the non-human through word, act, and imagining help us find other forms of knowledge and ways of being in the world. Can we gain new understandings of the ecology of our planet and our world at a time when this seems perhaps more important than ever? Science and its knowledges are failing to move us, to jolt us into feeling the fragility of the planet in which we all live, despite the clarity of their evidences and the increasing baldness of their language.

You will spend time in the landscape of the beautiful and diverse estate at Dartington Hall, walking, listening, meditating, making, marking, exploring, accepting, questioning, and writing. There will also be time for private making as well as group sessions and critiques.

The course links to a two-day symposium the following week (June 29-30) entitled ‘Language, Landscape and the Sublime’ which picks up on many of the themes you can explore in this short course. Participants of this short course will receive a £100 discount off of the Symposium fee when booked alongside this short course. If you would like to take advantage of the short course and symposium rate, please register below and email: shortcourseadmin@schumachercollege.org.uk to let us know.

Find more information about the Language, Landscape and the Sublime two-day symposium a twww.languagelandscape.info (link is external).

Summer School: Artistic and other Creative Practices as Drivers for Urban Resilience

September 5-7, 2016, Museu Municipal de Espinho (Portugal)

Summer school organized by the Centre for Social Studies (CES) at the University of Coimbra, in collaboration with the ESA Research Network Sociology of the Arts, and linked to the Midterm Conference being held in Porto on September 8-10, 2016.

The summer school is being held immediately before the 9th ESA RN2 Midterm conference, in the small coastal town of Espinho, within the Metropolitan Area of Porto.

Course description summary
Urban sustainable development requires enhancing urban resilience. In this Summer School, we look at resilience as a space for translocal bottom-up learning, emerging artistic-cultural-ecological approaches or as a ‘Space of Possibilities’: Resilience as openness, possibility, emergence, praxis, mutual learning and doing . . . not a 10-point governmental program to be implemented.

Several key characteristics of resilience (redundancy, diversity, learning modes, and self-organization) can potentially be fostered in urban neighborhoods through creative practices entangling natural and cultural resources and processes such as “ecological art” and “social practice” interventions, “urban gardening” projects, autonomous social-cultural centers fighting against gentrification, and artivist actions that question unsustainable city planning and societal behaviours. However, how far does the potential of such practices reach? When and how do they scale up to wider urban institutions as drivers of transformations, fostering systemic innovations? What limits and challenges do they encounter? How far do they foster urban resilience towards sustainability as a transformative search process of fundamental change, or are they coopted into neoliberal urban development?

The summer school, conceived as an extended workshop, will explore comparative insights across different urban initiatives and projects. We invite researchers, artists, and practitioners to address together several sets of questions and reflect on their empirical research, previous project experiences, and expertise from different cities.

Participants
Researchers (multidisciplinary), graduate students and post-docs, artists, and practitioners working with community-based artistic and sustainability/resilience initiatives

During the pre-registration process, applicants are asked to submit [HERE] a brief statement on the relevant project(s)/initiative(s) with which they are involved, and why they want to attend the summer school. These statements will be reviewed as part of the participant selection process.

Deadline: Sunday, May 1, 2016.
All applicants will be notified of selection process results by Monday, May 16, 2016.

Coordinators
Nancy Duxbury (CES) and Sacha Kagan (Leuphana University Lüneburg; ESA RN2)

Core Team

  • Nathalie Blanc, Le Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France
  • Hans Dieleman, Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Mexico; Cultura21
  • Nancy Duxbury, Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal
  • David Haley, Manchester Metropolitan University, England
  • Verena Holz, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Germany
  • Sacha Kagan, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Germany; ESA RN2; Cultura21

Registration
Earlybird rate (by May 31): € 150
Late rate from June 1: € 165

Fee includes: Summer School registration and materials | Welcome BBQ or dinner on Sept 5 | Lunch on Sept 6 and 7 | Breaks (5). (Accommodation and dinner on Sept. 6 at own cost.)

Maximum number of registrations: 25 | Minimum number of registrations: 20

This is a self-funded, non-profit Summer School.

For the full course description, detailed programme, bios of the core team, online pre-registration, and more, please visit: http://www.ces.uc.pt/cessummerschool//index.php?id=13412&id_lingua=2&pag=13413

Opportunity for Project Artist – Hawick Flood Protection Scheme

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Excellent opportunity for an artist to be part of a team working on flood protection – looks like a chance to shape thinking. Comes from CABN in the Borders.

May 2016 – October 2016
Deadline for applications:  Monday 25th April 2016
Fee:  £4000

A unique opportunity has arisen for a Project Artist to work closely with the engineering and project team around the Hawick Flood Protection Scheme (HFPS) and engage communities in the development and design of proposals which can be taken forward within the scheme.   The key priority of the HFPS works is to protect the town from the effects of a ‘1 in 75’ year flood event on the River Teviot, but the works also offer opportunities to incorporate imaginative place-making proposals, including for permanent public artworks, which can be taken forward into the second phase of the HFPS.

This opportunity has been enabled through a partnership between Scottish Borders Council, CH2M (scheme engineers) and the Creative Arts Business Network (CABN), and has already involved initial engagement with community groups around potential proposals.

More information is available on the CABN website –http://www.cabn.info/opportunities/project-artist-hawick-flood-protection-scheme.html

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Open Call for Artists: Scotland + Venice Project

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland/This post comes from Creative Scotland:

Scotland + Venice provides artists based in Scotland with a valuable platform to showcase their work on the international stage at one of the world’s most prestigious visual arts festivals, the Venice Biennale.

It is a partnership between Creative Scotland, National Galleries of Scotland and British Council Scotland, and is now seeking notes of interest from experienced curators and/or visual arts organisations who will work with them to deliver an ambitious and imaginative project that will run during the Biennale (May 13 to November 26 2017).

The partners expect the selected project to deliver:

  • A significant opportunity for the selected artist/s to produce ambitious and original work, taking into account the particular challenges and opportunities of Venice and the wider context of the Biennale;
  • High impact and visibility within an extremely busy and ever expanding Biennale with a good level of attendance that builds on previous Scotland + Venice presentations;
  • Strong critical and professional responses from within Scotland, the rest of the UK and internationally.

Additionally the partners will work with the selected individual/organisation to deliver:

  • High public and media profile, particularly within Scotland but also in the rest of the UK and internationally;
  • An effective approach to managing the exhibition in Venice and providing a warm and informative welcome to all visitors;
  • Audience development opportunities within Scotland that take a number of forms during the period of the Biennale and beyond;
  • A series of professional development opportunities that build on the previous experience of Scotland + Venice and that sustain the partnerships established with Scotland’s universities and colleges;
  • Increased profile for the visual arts community in Scotland, making the most of the opportunity that Venice affords to increase professional interest in the artists and arts organisations that are permanently based here.

Outline proposals should be completed using the templates provided on the Creative Scotland website and should be submitted to Amanda Catto, Head of Visual Arts at amanda.catto@creativescotland.com by 5pm on 14 April 2016. A shortlist of a maximum of 6 proposals will be established and we will invite the selected applicants to discuss these in more detail at an interview to be held in Edinburgh on 25 April 2016.

The post Open Call for Artists: Scotland + Venice Project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for proposals – Feeding the insatiable – a creative summit – November 9-11 2016

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Real and imagined narratives of art and energy for a troubled planet

This international summit takes place at Dartington Hall in southwest England from 16.30 on November 9 to 16.30 on November 11, 2016.

Encouraging all manner of energy generation through creative intervention and invention and new approaches to scientific enquiry including the quirky, the impossible, the micro and the personal.  Encouraging debate – practical, philosophical, metaphysical, and theoretical – bringing creative minds from many disciplines to bear on these pressing issues.

We also offer an accompanying residential short for three days adjacent to the summit, from Saturday November 11 Monday November 13.  Special pricing is available for both if registered together

Principal partners are Schumacher College, and Regen SW.

Scope

COP21, the climate talks held in Paris in December 2015 produced a breakthrough agreement after twenty years of frustrations, meanderings, compromises, and political squeamishness. The commitment to limit temperature rise to 2°C (whilst aiming for 1.5°C) represents a global commitment to wean the world from dirty energy to cleaner forms in which renewables must inevitably play a significant part: the only way the commitment can be met. This, we were told, ‘was the last chance… and we took it’; not all voices purred so positively but the outcome was broadly embraced.

The politicians and diplomats, it seems, have finally been moved to action. Moving the general populace has proved more difficult. Twenty years of increasingly immoderate language bordering at times on the hysterical, broadly-aligned and finely-honed but progressively panicky science from some of the world’s brightest minds, and even a grudging political consensus has made virtually no impact on how people live and how they consume: energy, food, the planet. In the meantime our government here in the UK sends out the most mixed of messages, lauding the outcome of COP21 whilst legislating to undermine renewable and clean energy and many other initiatives aimed at mitigating harm to the planet. Clean energy becomes a discussion about money, not about our world.

Art can change the world.  Artists have played an important part in every major social change in our society and have an indispensable role today in helping us deal with complex existential challenges.  But issues-laden art can be bombastic, unsubtle and lacking in spirit, particularly when artists insist they have a message to send. Renewable energy can change the world, too. But we don’t have to accept that only industrial scale installations are the answer.

This gathering encourages through creative intervention and invention and new approaches to scientific enquiry all manner of energy generation including the quirky, the impossible, the micro and the personal. It encourages debate – practical, philosophical, metaphysical, and theoretical – about how creative minds and creative spirit can be brought to bear on these issues.

We explore ways in which creative makers and enquirers –– artists, scientists, philosophers, theorists and others –– can increasingly play a part in moving rather than cajoling, inspiring rather than scaring, succouring rather than scourging. The impassioned voice has an essential role to play in shifting the inert and entrenched thinking about how we live in the world, how we consume its resources and how we subvert and circumvent monolithic thinking. The danger lies not in those with abrasively negative views (as panic leads to stridency bordering on the absurd and numbers inevitably dwindle to irrelevancy under the growing weight of evidence), but those who have no views at all.  Flicking the switch is so utterly fundamental to our daily lives that we gasp with horror and puzzlement if it produces no effect.

How can the lights not come on?

Potential topics

This are suggested topics only; the list is not intended to be proscriptive

  • transformational potential of art
  • visioning change
  • imaginative and invented narratives and technologies
  • micro-generation and body-derived energy
  • plant and other organic power generators
  • beyond communication
  • energy and metaphor
  • message and instrumentalisation
  • slow art, process
  • non-literal big data visualisation
  • envisioning the profound
  • aesthetics of art/science
  • using imagination for social change
  • emotion / science
  • sensible / actual
  • new ways of seeing
  • new ways of knowing
  • evolving meaning
  • celebrating authenticity and ethos
  • energy in the animal world
  • ethnographics, big data, climate change, understanding
  • exploring chasms between artists and industry
  • energy futures and questions of design

Keynote speakers

Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian of Land Art Generator Initiative

The Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), provides a platform for artists, architects, landscape architects, and other creatives working with engineers and scientists to bring forward human-centered solutions for sustainable energy infrastructures that enhance the city as works of public art while cleanly powering thousands of homes.

Laura Watts (IT University of Copenhagen): writer, poet and ethnographer of futures

Laura is a Writer, Poet, & Ethnographer, and Associate Professor in Science and Technology Studies (STS) at IT University of Copenhagen. Her interest is in the effect of landscape on how the future is imagined and made in everyday practice. How might the future be made differently in different places? Over the last fifteen years, she has collaborated with industry and organisations in telecoms, public transport, and renewable energy, to re-imagine how the future gets made in high-tech industry, and how it might be made otherwise.

ICE Art & Energy 200

During the summit we will launch the callout for the ICE Art & Energy prize, an engaging, clean energy generating, international art competition, led by Regen SW and the Institution of Civil Engineers.

The competition challenges outstanding artists and designers to collaborate with civil engineers to construct an iconic piece of public art that also generates energy at scale. The winning piece will be installed in a UK city by 2020.

Day 0: Research Day

During the day on November 9 an invited group of artists, engineers and others will meet to discuss issues around art and renewable energy, public art, ephemeral art, and how to foster closer ties between artists and industry. A summary of this day will be presented during the main summit, and a report published. This meeting will be led by Chris Fremantle, founder of ecoartscotland and is hosted by Schumacher College‘s arts and ecology programme

Find out more

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Opportunity: Green Scholarship for Postgraduate Study

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Postcode Lottery Green Challenge Scholarship is a competition for prospective and current students wishing to pursue a postgraduate degree with the view that it will help lead to the development of a ‘green themed’ commercial concept.

The competition rewards concepts and ideas that successfully combine sustainability, entrepreneurship and creativity. A judging panel will consider applications that could conceivably be brought to market and potentially make a contribution towards reducing carbon emissions.

The competition is a unique funding opportunity offering students the chance to win a scholarship of up to £20,000 to cover their postgraduate degree tuition fees for up to 3 years.

 

Apply here: http://www.postcodeculturetrust.org.uk/scholarship

Application deadline: March 30th

The post Opportunity: Green Scholarship for Postgraduate Study appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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