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Last Chance: Designing for Climate Futures at Loughborough University UK

Fri 19 October, 6:00pm – 7:00pm

Venue: MHL 1.17a/b, Martin Hall

FREE

Book Tickets

This conversation brings together three practitioners to explore what roles design might play in collective responses to climate change. Taking in a variety of methods, approaches and forms of design – from permaculture to architectural design; from transition design to design fictions – it will explore design as a tool for collective organisation. What can design do in the here-and-now of our warming world? What might design do in a more ecologically just world? And how might it help us get from here to there?

There’ll be plenty of chance for the audience to ask questions and there will be free refreshments and snacks.

PANELLISTS

JOANNA BOEHNERT is an environmental communicator, designer and educator. She’s a Lecturer in Design and the Creative Industries at Loughborough University and is the founding director of EcoLabs, a studio visualising complex environmental issues. Her book Design, Ecology, Politics: Towards the Ecocene was published by Bloomsbury earlier this year, and has been praised as ‘a must-read for everyone interested in design, ecology, communication and politics.’
https://ecolabsblog.com/

ANNE MARIE-CULHANE is an artist whose work across a number of forms seeks to catalyse collective organisation to reduce the harm being inflicted on the planet, to increase understanding of our place in the world, and to bring to life positive visions now and for the future. She works closely with the University’s Sustainability team as the founder of Fruit Routes, a project that saw the planting of fruit, nut trees and edible plants along footpaths and cycle paths across the university campus. It creates a spring snowfall of blossom and an autumnal abundance of fresh fruits and berries for harvesting, foraging, eating and distributing.
https://www.amculhane.co.uk/

BIANCA ELZENBAUMER combines design research methods with critical approaches to education, conflict mediation and DIY making to explore how designers can contribute to create ecologically and socially just economies. Together with Fabio Franz she founded ‘Brave New Alps’, who have instigated a number of acclaimed projects that instigate, as well as explore, alternative ways of organising our lives. These have involved collaborative working with refugees, workers’ rights groups, artists and place-based communities. Bianca is also a lecturer at Leeds Art University. http://www.brave-new-alps.com/

The conversation will be chaired by DAVID BELL, Radar’s Programme Co-Ordinator. He is also a member of Out of the Woods, a writing collective exploring the forms of sociality and struggle required to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.

This event is part of the annual Fruit Routes Harvest programme, organised by the Sustainability team at Loughborough University. Across the 19th and 20th of October there are a number of events taking place on campus. For more information please visit http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/sustainability/biodiversity/fruit-route/.

News: Launch of the Library of Creative Sustainability

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re excited to announce the launch of the Library of Creative Sustainability during Climate Week 2018: a new digital resource showcasing best practice examples of collaborations between sustainability partners and artists seeking to make the world a better place!

New library on the block

The Library of Creative Sustainability is a new digital resource for people working to address the challenging issues of environmental sustainability and climate change, demonstrating the benefits of collaborating with artists and cultural approaches to help achieve their aims.

Taking its inspiration from the work of American civic artist Frances Whitehead and the Embedded Artist Project, and many other contemporary and historic examples, the library presents case studies highlighting the range of skills, expertise and practices which artists have contributed to bringing about positive change in society – addressing social, environmental, economic and cultural sustainability.

In developing the Library of Creative Sustainability we aim to:

  • Provide a very practical resource for non-arts organisations and arts practitioners to support working with ‘embedded artists’ over extended periods to develop new policy and practice
  • Showcase a selection of inspiring and innovative examples that engage organisational leaders in the potential of working with artists to help achieve their aims

In developing the Library we have spoken with users working in diverse fields including energy, local government, natural heritage and forestry to help us develop content relevant and applicable to the interests and needs of non-arts sectors, and have researched case studies with the aid of many of the featured artists and organisations.

Explore the library!

What is an Embedded Artist?

“Frances Whitehead is a civic practice artist bringing the methods, mindsets, and strategies of contemporary art practice to the process of shaping the future city” – A Blade of Grass

Credit: SLOW Clean-UP, Frances Whitehead

It is widely recognised that artists across all artforms can bring new insight and alternative perspectives to non-arts contexts. This is shown in exhibitions and performances, and also in artists’ processes working with organisations and communities. Artists can bring the perspective of the ‘stranger’, being able to see with fresh eyes and question things often taken for granted.

Some of the key principles of the Embedded Artist role highlighted by case studies include:

  • Working within non-arts institutions over extended periods – this requires organisations to be comfortable with ambiguity and not starting with fixed outcomes. It was important to allow time for the ideas to develop.
  • Bringing different ways of thinking and working to bear on challenging projects such as large-scale regeneration of post-industrial sites. Creating artworks is not the focus of projects, although may be an aspect of the outcomes.
  • Highlighting an integrated approach, ensuring that environmental and social sustainability are considered alongside economics.
  • Facilitating wider public participation and breaking down professional, departmental and disciplinary boundaries.

Launching the Library

“We wanted to put the power of creative thinking in the hands of community organisations and give people a chance to think positively in the face of climate change.” – Eve Mosher

Credit: Eve Mosher, HighWaterLine

We’re excited to launch the first five library case studies celebrating national and international examples of creative sustainability during Scotland’s 2018 Climate Week:

  • SLOW Clean-UP civic Experiments: tackling abandoned petrol stations through phytoremediation and community involvement (Chicago, USA)
  • WATERSHED+: a strategic long term programme embedding artists in the work of the Calgary City Utilities and Environmental Protection Department (Calgary, Alberta, Canada)
  • HighWaterLine: drawing a line on the cityscape to open up community dialogue on climate change and the impact of flooding (New York, USA; Miami, USA; Bristol, UK)
  • The Stove Network: a membership based arts-led project contributing to the regeneration of Dumfries (Dumfries, Scotland, UK)
  • Sutton Tidal Attenuation Barrier and Falkenham Saltmarsh Tidal Management Scheme: Estuarine protection works that involve artist Simon Read working with communities of inhabitants, landowners and public agencies (Suffolk, England, UK)

Keep an eye out on TwitterFacebook or Instagram for the latest updates and help to share case studies with your networks!

A Growing Resource 

This is just the beginning! We will continue to research and regularly publish new case studies with another round of examples on its way very soon.

We are actively seeking suggestions for new case studies from sustainability and arts practitioners about projects you are involved in or are aware of that could become part of this growing resource. We would also love to hear about your experience of using the library so that we can continue to make improvements to its functionality.

Please get in touch with Gemma Lawrence, culture/SHIFT Producer, Creative Carbon Scotland.

Project partners

The Library of Creative Sustainability has been developed in collaboration with Senior Researcher Chris Fremantle (Gray’s School of Art, Robert Gordon University) with the support of Allison Palenske, Elly White, and Niamh Coutts.

We are grateful to all of the artists and organisations who have kindly contributed their time to the development of library case studies.



The post News: Launch of the Library of Creative Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

A Studio in the Woods, Artists in Residence 2018/19

This News Comes from A Studio in the Woods

A Studio in the Woods has announced the 2018-2019 Adaptations: Living with Change Residents. In its second year of a three year cycle, Adaptations: Living with Change residencies invite artists to examine how climate driven adaptations – large and small, historic and contemporary, cultural and scientific – are shaping our future. In 2018 -19 A Studio in the Woods will host six residencies to competitively selected artists from all disciplines that have demonstrated an established dialogue with art as social practice and a commitment to sparking creative discourse. Each artist will host a dinner and presentation of their work during their residency as well as public programming specific to their project.

Jonathan “rat de bois farouche” Mayers, Louisiana, October – November 2018 – Jonathan “rat de bois farouche” Mayers is a Louisiana Creole artist and writer from Baton Rouge, LA. While in residence, Jonathan will create high-relief, mixed-media works presenting landscapes from Grand Isle, Bayou Segnette, St. Bernard Parish and Maurepas Swamp. They will be populated with imaginary beasts using paint and physical materials from the region to bring awareness to consequences surrounding environmental change, human conflict, cultural identity, and attitudes toward la Terre. To further these narratives and in celebration of historic multiculturalism in Balbancha, the Tricentennial year of New Orleans, and the 50th Anniversary of CODOFIL, he plans to write a bilingual French and English mythological micro story or poem for each work completed, some of which will be crafted in collaboration with members of the community.

Jonathan Mayers, La Louve blanche protégeant Rayne (The White Wolf Protecting Rayne), 2018, acrylic, sediment and blue crawfish claws from the L’Eau est La Vie camp in Rayne, Louisiana on panel, repurposed frame.

Aurora Levins Morales, California, October – November 2018 – Aurora Levins Morales is an internationally known Puerto Rican Jewish feminist poet and essayist whose work explores issues of identity, social justice, and the interwoven social and natural histories of our landscapes and our bodies. While in residence Aurora will produce a prose poetry book and podcast series exploring the connections between the ecological and social histories of the Mississippi River and the Caribbean Sea, as well as the shared experiences of New Orleans and Puerto Rico of hurricane devastation and disaster capitalism, drawing from community story circles, and extending into visions for just and resilient futures.

Aurora Levins Morales

Manon Bellet, Louisiana, November – December 2018 – Manon Bellet is a French visual and olfactory artist who has lived and worked in New Orleans since 2016. Manon will extract scents from strategically chosen historic places in New Orleans and its surrounding regions which are destined to disappear soon due to ecological issues. This work aims to highlight the notions of being rooted and uprooted, especially in Louisiana. The project intends to show the risks for people who remain attached to their land, their territory, their place. Through the experience of these scents the artist hopes to broaden awareness of environmentally vulnerable areas.

Manon Bellet, Toxicité Radieuse, 2017, mixed media

Geraldine Laurendeau, Canada, January – February 2019 – Geraldine Laurendeau is a multidisciplinary artist from Montreal. A trained ethnologist, she collaborates with First Nations, museums and research institutions as an independent curator, designer and consultant on projects related to environment, land planning, heritage, culture and biodiversity conservation, food security and health. During her residency, Geraldine will look at how Louisiana’s diverse cultural groups have developed strategies to adapt and deal with the abundance of water in the region. Geraldine will use drawing and photography to document the biogeography of the area, studying topography, water movements, landscape forms and vernacular architecture. Through this work Geraldine will explore solutions while creating a water resilient site-specific earthwork that will evolve over time.

Geraldine Laurendeau, Under Arthur’s Seat, 2008, digital photography

Ash Arder, Michigan, December 2018 and May 2019 – Ash Arder is a transdisciplinary artist who creates idea and object-based systems for interpreting and re-imagining interspecies relations (i.e. relations between humans and plants). This highly flexible, research-based approach examines these relationships primarily through pop culture and historic lenses. Ash will continue developing a multi-sensory body of work that examines human-plant relations through the lens of agricultural experiments in 19th century Louisiana. Archival reports from these experiments and found field recordings will be used as source material for new works that question historic human-plant relations and speculate about the future of that exchange.

Ash Arder, Untitled (Thunderstorm Terror), 2017, Electronics, cassette tape, soil, nettle seeds

Hannah Pepper-Cunningham, Louisiana, March – April 2019 – Hannah Pepper-Cunningham has been creating performance work in New Orleans since 2009. A member of Mondo Bizarro from 2009-2018, Hannah served as co-artistic director of training programs and collaboratively developed and performed in “Cry You One” and “The Way at Midnight.” A member of Southerners on New Ground and Alternate ROOTS, Hannah organizes in multi-racial, multi-issue coalitions for racial and economic justice and LGBTQ liberation. In collaboration with New Orleans-based artists and organizers Hannah will create “Unfamiliar” (working title), a touring performance and workshop that will engage people to shift their relationships of care and responsibility in the era of climate change. Drawing on Hannah’s work in live performance, actor training and traditional music; the performance and accompanying workshop will be built to support organizing in multiracial movements for climate justice in the Southeast.

Hannah Pepper-Cunningham


 

About A Studio in The Woods:

A Studio in the Woods, located in 7.66 forested acres on the Mississippi River in New Orleans, is dedicated to preserving the endangered bottomland hardwood forest and providing within it a peaceful retreat where artists and scholars can work uninterrupted. A program of Tulane University’s ByWater Institute, A Studio in the Woods focuses on interrelated areas of programming including artistic and scholarly residencies, forest restoration, and science-inspired art education for children and adults. For more information, visit: www.astudiointhewoods.org.

Aviva Rahmani’s “Blued Trees Symphony”

This News Comes From Ecological Artists, Aviva Rahmani.

I’m excited to announce my new interview with The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), fresh off the (digital) presses! “The Blued Trees Symphony” is Fiscally Sponsored through NYFA. I’m a proud recipient of a 2016 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellowship in Architecture/Environmental Structures/Design. Click here to read the full interview.

If you are interested in purchasing Art, Theory and Practice in the Anthropoceneedited by Julie Reiss which includes the essay, “Blued trees as policy: art, law, science and the Anthropocene,” there is a 12% discount code FLYPR12 when you order online!

Please check out the link below for upcoming events:

Feverish World Symposium, EcoCulture Lab
When: October 22, 2018
Where: Burlington, VT

Also…

Excerpts from Aviva Rahmani’s work-in-progress book on developing and applying trigger point theory and the evolving Blued Trees Symphony opera are uploaded each month for subscribers at https://d.rip/aviva please join!

Top Image: “Blued Trees Stands for Environmental Justice” photograph by Joel Greenberg, August 30, 2018


 

Blued Trees is a division of Gulf to Gulf, a project fiscally sponsored by NYFA (New York Foundation for the Arts), a 501©3, tax exempt organization founded in 1971 to work with the arts community throughout New York State to develop and facilitate programs in all disciplines. NYFA will receive grants on behalf of the project and ensure the use of grant funds in accordance with the grant agreements as well as provide program or financial reports as required. Any donations made to the project through NYFA are tax deductible!

Climate Signals opening reception, 9/21 NYC

Join The Climate Museum on September 21 to celebrate their second exhibition at the Admiral’s House on Governors Island!

The reception will be held from 7:00pm – 9:00pm. Please RSVP here.

The opening will celebrate Climate Signals, a multi-site public art installation by Justin Brice Guariglia co-presented with the NYC Mayor’s Office – Climate Policy and Programs and a host of partners across the City you can find here.

The Climate Museum will also be celebrating the Climate Museum hub, the Museum’s first temporary space. The hub features an interactive room where you can create and share your own climate signal. In addition, together with the NYC Climate Action Alliance, they are presenting Climate Changers of NY, a series of large-scale portraits by David Noles celebrating New Yorkers who are making a difference.

The climate crisis requires us to think, talk, and act together. The intention of both Climate Signals and Climate Changers is to move us toward that connection and engagement. Join The Climate Museum!

2018 CREATIVE CLIMATE AWARDS NOMINATES DANIELLE EUBANK

Danielle Eubank, a Los Angeles-based painter dedicated to painting bodies of water across the world, has been nominated for the Human Impact Institute’s 2018 Creative Climate Awards in Manhattan, NY, opening Sept 17, 2018.

“I have made it my life’s work to show audiences the preciousness of water,” says Eubank. “I have dedicated the last 17 years to showing the diversity of water and encouraging audiences to really look at it.”

Her depictions of the oceans are a mixture of realism and abstraction, inviting us to create our own ideas of water from different perspectives. Examining water from different parts of the world, she deconstructs its form into separate abstract stacks of textures, shapes, and colors.

In addition to enticing audiences to really look at distinct water sources she paints, she will ask the audience to do two practical things, now, to take action to address climate change. She has created handheld cards with her artwork on one side and suprisingly simple steps we all can take to help combat climate change, on the other. The audience is encouraged to put two on their person, in their pocket, and carry them around with them.

Eubank began painting all of Earth’s oceans in 2001. She has traveled over 30,000 miles on sea, painted more than 200 bodies of water, and visited 21 countries. She strives to facilitate public conversation about water issues through her work and experiences. Using mostly oil paints to document these bodies of water, she works to bring awareness to issues like climate change and water conservation.

She plans to visit Antarctica in February 2019 to paint her last ocean–the Southern Ocean. For more information see www.oneartistfiveoceans.com

Human Impacts Institute’s 2018 Creative Climate Awards runs Sept 17-Oct 12, 2018.

Opening: Sept 17, 2018 6-8:30pm. Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) 1 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017 https://www.humanimpactsinstitute.org/creative-climate-awards.

About the Human Impacts Institute

Human Impacts Institute are social entrepreneurs who create and share innovative approaches to tackling social and environmental issues. Programs pair artists and scientists to engage new audiences in climate change solutions, bring youth to the boardroom, and get policy makers’ hands dirty as they care for local street trees. The Institute is action-oriented. The Institute helps people of diverse ages and backgrounds connect personally to the most pressing environmental issues. The Institute believes the environment is not separate from our society and that healthy communities, stable economies, and social equity cannot exist without environmental well-being. They go beyond doling out information in hope that people will change. Instead, they inspire people to transform their behavior by making issues personal to their lives.

News: New wildlife photo exhibition on show in Edinburgh

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

A public photo exhibition, showcasing images of wildlife and scenery on the National Cycle Network has gone on show in Edinburgh.

The Go Wild exhibition, showcasing stunning images of wildlife and scenery on the National Cycle Network in Scotland, has gone on show along the Union Canal in Edinburgh.

The free exhibition, which showcases submissions from photographers of all abilities as part of Sustrans Scotland’s Go Wild photography competition, will be displayed at Lochrin Basin until 30th August.

Greener Greenways

Go Wild is part of Sustrans Scotland’s Greener Greenways project, which is part-funded by Scottish Natural Heritage, and aims to improve and enhance biodiversity on traffic-free sections of the Network that are home to a variety of animals and plant species.

The shortlisted photos range from a playful stoat to scenic shots highlighting breath-taking views along National Cycle Network routes in Scotland.

Sustrans Scotland Volunteers Coordinator, Laura White said: “We hope these photos will inspire and encourage more people to explore their local area by foot or bike, and enjoy the fantastic scenery and wildlife the National Cycle Network has to offer.”

“The National Cycle Network plays a vital role in supporting and promoting a wide variety of wildlife in Scotland and is a fantastic place for people to experience some of the rich biodiversity that Scotland has to offer.”

See the exhibition

You can visit the exhibition at Lochrin Basin, EH3 9QD, along the Union Canal in Edinburgh during the month of August. Visit www.sustrans.org.uk/scotphotocomp18 for more information.

There are approximately 2,371 miles (3,815 km) of National Cycle Network routes in Scotland, including 644 miles of traffic-free routes which use a mix of railway path, canal towpath, forest road, shared-use path, segregated cycle lanes and re-determined rural footways. It plays a vital role in helping people to travel by foot, bike or public transport for more every day journeys and can act as a green corridor for wildlife.

 


The post News: New wildlife photo exhibition on show in Edinburgh appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Recipients of Spanish Heritage Exchange Residency Announced

This Post Comes From A Studio in the Woods

The Cultural Office of the Embassy of Spain and SPAIN-USA Foundation have envisioned a cultural exchange residency between New Orleans, Louisiana and Las Palmas, Canary Islands to facilitate the exchange of ideas and experiences between creators from Spain and the United States through artist residencies and to explore themes related to artistic and cultural heritage from a creative and multidisciplinary perspective. These residencies address the general theme of heritage and conservation, focusing on the interrelationships between art and culture, the use (and re-uses) of heritage sites, new opportunities and public participation in the context of the city and our society.

The calls for artists were announced in April and artists were selected in early July.  From New Orleans, artist Monique Verdin will travel to live and work at La Regenta, an art center in Las Palmas of the Canary Islands. From the Canary Islands, artist Julio Blancas will come to New Orleans to live and work at A Studio in the Woods. The two artists will overlap during their time in both regions and will come together to explore the shared cultural and environmental concerns of the Canary Islands and the Gulf Coast.  The residencies will span October 22 – December 14, 2018 and honor New Orleans’ tricentennial year and Spanish roots.

About the Artists:

Julio Blancas was born in 1967 in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria. He studied art at Las Escuelas de Artes Plásticas in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria and sculpture in Santa Cruz, Tenerife. He works mainly with pencil or graphite on paper, canvas, or satellite dishes and has participated in more than forty group exhibitions and seven solo exhibitions in both his home in Gran Canaria, Spain as well as other countries such as Belgium, Italy, and Germany.

Working almost exclusively with pencil and graphite, Blancas uses nature as a source of inspiration. His methodology is simple: to fill the artistic surface by repeating the essential graphic gesture – the line. The line made with graphite reflects light, creates subtle gradations, and molds forms that arise from the opacity of the black surface. Blancas works with the idea of memory, simulating natural spaces that serve as mental landscapes. These landscapes provide a strongly structural sense of the end result through the art’s intention and meaning.

Julio Blancas, Sedimentos, Charcoal on paper

Monique Verdin has been intimately documenting the complex interconnectedness of environment, economics, culture, climate and change in southeast Louisiana for decades. Her indigenous Houma relatives, their lifeways at the ends of the bayous, and the realities of restoration and adaptation in the heart of America’s Mississippi River Delta have been the primary focus of her work.

Monique is the subject/co-writer/co-producer of the award-winning documentary My Louisiana Love (2012). Her interdisciplinary work has been included in an assortment of environmentally inspired projects, including the multiplatform performance ecoexperience Cry You One (2012-2017) as well as the publication Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas (2013). Monique is a member of the United Houma Nation Tribal Council and is director of The Land Memory Bank & Seed Exchange; an experiential project engaged in building a community record through cultural happenings, strategic installations and as a digital archive to share stories, native seeds and local knowledge.


Monique Verdin, Bayou Pointe Aux Chenes, Terrebonne, Louisiana, 2008. Inkjet print

___________________________________________

About A Studio in The Woods:

A Studio in the Woods, located in 7.66 forested acres on the Mississippi River in New Orleans, is dedicated to preserving the endangered bottomland hardwood forest and providing within it a peaceful retreat where visual, literary and performing artists can work uninterrupted. A program of Tulane University’s ByWater Institute, A Studio in the Woods focuses on interrelated areas of programming including artists’ residencies, forest restoration, and science-inspired art education for children and adults. One of a few live-in artists’ retreats in the Deep South, A Studio in the Woods fosters both environmental preservation and the creative work of all artists. For more information, visit: www.astudiointhewoods.org.

About La Regenta:

El Centro de Arte La Regenta, located in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, is a public institution that was founded in 1987 and is dedicated to the exhibition, education, production and promotion of contemporary art, from a local, national and international perspective. Its programming includes exhibitions, workshops, seminars, talks, debates and didactic activities, with attention to all manifestations of contemporary culture, that are conceived for all types of audiences and public. Located in a former tobacco factory, el Centro de Arte La Regenta also houses a library and archive. For more information, visit: http://www.laregenta.org/

Centro de Arte La Regenta Exterior

About the Cultural Office of the Embassy of Spain:

The Cultural Office of the Embassy of Spain, through its official cultural program SPAIN arts & culture, aims to promote Spanish culture in the U.S. through fruitful cultural exchanges among institutions and artists, fostering positive bilateral relations between our two countries. Among its objectives, the program enhances shared knowledge on the cultural and creative industries and facilitates professional opportunities for artists, drawing on our common Hispanic heritage. We partner with American institutions to build institutional alliances and long-lasting transnational bridges through the arts in a broad sense. Our multidisciplinary approach covers a wide range of fields from design, to urban culture, culinary arts, music, cinema, literature, visual arts and performing arts. For more information, visit: https://www.spainculture.us/

Top Image: A Studio in the Woods Exterior, Photo by Neil Alexander, 2018

We’re Reinventing Our Subscription Model on Patreon

We have some important updates to share. 

SUBCRIBE ON PATREON

What is the Hope?We’ve been working on a number of interesting projects! In April we released “Where is the Hope,” an anthology of Short Climate Change Plays which came out of the 2017 Climate Change Theatre Action. That project, a distributed festival, had nearly 150 sites and over 200 events. We’ve also released the 20th issue of the quarterly, with issue 21 coming out shortly, a fantastic exploration of “Material Futures” guest edited by Whitefeather Hunter. We have a number of exciting Guest Editors lined up for future issues of the Quarterly, including the Lab for Aesthetics and EcologyRyan ThompsonMK Meador, and Calvin Rocchio. Back issues are available here!Reports and Quarterlies also get sent immediately to all of our subscribers… and that’s what this is really about. A big thing we’re working on is transitioning our membership platform to patreon. This is planned to make it easier to support us and access our work, like the Quarterly. With patreon, you can pay your subscription in monthly instalments, and choose from a number of subscription tiers, adjusting the level of benefits. Digital copies of the Quarterly will be delivered immediately through patreon’s platform. We’re also introducing organizational subscriptions, so your school, university, non-profit or company can subscribe, and receive a special level of perks.

We have a goal of $1200 per month, which is to allow us to continue to improve what we do, paying contributors to the quarterly based on WAGE stands and restarting limited print distribution of the Quarterly, along with continuing to support our programs, projects and administrative costs. But, mainly, we want to pay our contributors, now that we’re publishing at a good clip!

Of course, all current memberships on our existing annual subscription program will be honored for a full year from this email. Even if you signed up 364 days ago, we’ll keep you going for one full year from today as we transition to the new platform. When it comes time to renew, one year from today, we’ll ask that if you continue to value the work that we’re doing, that you re-subscribe on patreon then.

Thanks for continuing to support the CSPA and our work– we hope to keep supporting the dialogue surrounding sustainability and the arts for years to come!

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Open Call: California Air Resources Board Public Art RFQ

The Southern California ConsolidationProject for the California Air Resource Board (CARB) is an approximately 400,000square-foot facility on a 19-acre campus located in Riverside, CA. The campus is one of the world’s largest and most advanced emissions testing and research facilities and consolidates five existing locations into one state-of-the-art facility. The campus, under the design-build team of ZGF, Hensel Phelps (HP), and Affiliated Engineers, Inc. (AEI), is the largest true zero net energy facility of its type and has the highest sustainability goals including Zero Net Energy, LEED Platinum,CALGreen Tier 2, and Zero Carbon. The Public Art Program is comprised of three open call commissions and is developed and managed by Dyson & Womack.

Opportunities

There are three unique public art commission opportunities open to artists through this open call Request for Qualifications (RFQ) / Request for Proposals (RFP) process. We encourage artists to take time looking at each opportunity and to apply to the commission that best suits their interests and work. Artists may apply to more than one commission opportunity but must apply separately to each. Artists are encouraged to submit Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) with artwork samples and letters of interest that are relevant to the specific commission to which they are applying, even when applying to multiple opportunities. We encourage artists to engage critically with the mission of CARB and the vision of the Art Plan to shape the future of public art in California and across our diverse communities.

The context of CARB is one of innovation, discovery, and stewardship of the environment. It is integral to the story of California and is a rich space for the creation of art. CARB was formed through a merger of the Bureau of Air Sanitation and the California Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Board, in 1967. It is charged with protecting the public from the harmful effects of air pollution and developing programs and actions to fight climate change.

  • Green Commission: $450,000
  • Entrance Foyer AuditoriumWall Commission: $150,000
  • Side Entrance Foyer Commission: $100,000

Application Requirements:

1. Contact Information

2. Statement of Interest

3. Resume/CV

4. Artist Statement

5. Documentation of Past Projects

6. Statement of Sustainable Practice

7. References

How to Apply

All SOQs must be submitted electronically through the online SOQ submission platform located at the RFQ site, www.CARB.dysonwomack.com by Friday, August 31, 2018 at 5:00 PM (PST).

Artists and Artist Teams may apply to one or more of the three open call public art commission opportunities but must submit a unique SOQ to each. Artists and Artist Teams may only apply once to each specific commission opportunity.

We strongly encourage applicants to review all materials and supporting documents available prior to responding to this RFQ. SOQs submitted late, or through any other means than the application portal, will not be reviewed.

Visit project site now for more information!