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In Conversation: Gudrun Filipska and Veronica Sekules

Gudrun Filipska from the Arts Territory Exchange in conversation with Veronica Sekules the founder of ‘Groundwork‘ the First Gallery in the UK to be dedicated to Art and the enviroment. The conversation covers issues surrounding arts and ecology, artists and travel, fracking, global warming and discusses the last exhibition held at Groundwork ‘Fire and Ice’ by Jessica Rayner and Gina Glover as well as advertising the start date for the next exhibition Trash Art by Jan Eric Visser opening on the 9th of March.



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Groundwork is located near to the banks of the river Ouse in the slowly regenerating post- industrial docklands area of Kings Lynn, UK. When the gallery opened in 2016 the curator and owner Veronica Sekules asked artist Richard Long if he would make a piece for the gallery – he agreed and requested a sample of Ouse mud, he subsequently made The Great Ouse River Drawing which is on permanent display at the gallery.

The river Ouse, with a winding course of 143 miles, ambles its way from central England through the Fens, past Ely and onwards to Kings Lynn where it it flows into the mouth of the Wash. The name itself suggests the slow moving Laugour of a river laden heavy with mud and silt. In the Fens it is an essential and highly modified channel which takes the burden of overflow water from the periodically flooded and highly prized agricultural land. The Fens are a place of silt, a land deforested, desiccated and compartmentalised and much Fen silt ends up deposited at the mouth of the Wash in Kings Lynn.

GF What does it mean to you to be close to the Ouse?It is such a powerful emblem to me of the drainage of the Fens and the subsequent ecological consequences, I can’t imagine a more perfect location for Groundwork and the work by Richard Long using the Ouse mud further embeds the gallery in its location…The emblem of the river seems to be a very important one in ‘environmental art’ I am thinking of Jem Southam’s River photographs and Olafur Eliasson’s ‘Riverbed’ among others…

VS The river location is absolutely critical to the gallery’s identity and ethos. It is exactly because of it, and the fact that it is in a food plain, that a focus on the environment made complete sense, both in the context of the town and the need for it to be explicit about its perilous position in the light of climate change, and in terms of the art world at large. There are no other galleries with quite the same concentrate and consistent focus. Its location gives it its legitimacy and the reason for its urgency. Apart from this important foundation idea for the gallery, I have not yet pursued it specifcally as a theme (except with Richard Long), although I have been talking for some time to Simon Faithfull about exhibiting a series of images he has made while sailing the Great Ouse. I hope that will form the core of a theme to be pursued from 2019.

The specifc details of the history of the local river, or rivers, as you say are pertinent – not so much literally, but as a symbol of how environmental change is a part of bigger societal change and often controlled by factors which are not benefcial for it. The Great Ouse has had a chequered history and now is hardly used by boats. It fows out to the Wash and the opening out of the fenland landscape can be seen just beyond the town boundary. The conficting pull of the tides has always made it difcult to navigate, which the engineers who drained the fens in the 17th century tried to avoid, or remedy, by opening up alternate river channels. It has also always had a tendency to silt up badly, a fact noticed by Daniel Defoe in the early18th century. Its tributary, the Purfeet upon which the gallery building sits directly, was worse, as it was slower to drain and fow and was known as a stinking drain in the 19th century. Now it is culverted and maintained (sort of) by the Council as a reed-bed, seldom cut, in order to preserve its biodiversity. In summer, ducks live there, as well as moorhens, reed warblers and plenty of dragonfies.

Richard Long made his 2016 drawing with Great Ouse mud, as it needed to be tidal. For me it is a

symbol of the endurance of nature, its structures surviving and adapting to change and it holds out hope, not least that an artist can be the one to remind us of its modest powers.

The Great Ouse River Drawing – By Richard Long, July 2016. Created specially for Groundwork. Image Veronica Sekules

GF Your recent exhibition ‘Fire and Ice’ by Gina Glover and Jessica Rayner touched on so many issues, from energy use and climate change to post industrial futures and economies of human confict. I was particularly struck by the theme of ruin and degradation. Ideas of ruin, which have long been explored in environmental art are touched on here in a literal sense by the melting of ice and the destructiveness of fre but also in a more complicated way in ‘Poisoned waters run deep’ Glover’s black and white series of photographs documenting fracking sites in the US – on frst look the images echo Bernd and Hilla Becher’s industrial photographs (1966-1999) they have a similar formalist style and it almost takes a second look to realise the series is contemporary.The aesthetic of the photographs speak through a similar nostalgia to that evoked by the Becher’s images of post industrial monuments but their positioning as new emblems of industrial intervention mean they act both as markers for future ruin and degeneration as well as cleverly harking back to ‘ruin’ as nostalgic site of mourning…do you have any thoughts on these ideas?

VS Yes, this is very interesting indeed and the more one thinks about it and views the images, the more complex the issues become. I have had the privilege of talking quite a lot to the artists, and

then seeing the images every day for several months, and engaging in numerous conversations, some of them with people who have been very thoughtful and knowledgeable about the issues they tackle. Gina Glover’s Poisoned Water Runs Deep images were generally reckoned to be powerful, hard hitting. In fact they were printed in black and white, with heightened negative in the background, but there is one of the original colour prints reproduced in her book ‘The Metabolic Landscape’ which shows how extensively she manipulated the image subsequently to give it a doom-laden edge. So, in monochrome, it has become superfcially more like a Bernt and Hilla Becher than before, though, while I agree theirs suggest ideas of post industrial ruin and a nostalgia for a lost economy, I think that Gina’s images aim to portray the machinery as an active agent of destruction rather than ruin. There is something of the science fction about her tanks and ladders and rocket-like projections, and I fnd them a little frightening. On the other hand, equally manipulated digitally to enhance their soft colours and mists, her melting ice pictures are simply beautiful, one of them, someone said they could just stand in front of endlessly, as it took their breath away. That was their strange power – we ought to be disturbed because of the loss they represent, yet their beauty induces a sense of guilt.

Image from Gina Glover’s Poisoned Water Runs Deep photographic series. Groundwork 2017.

Jessica Rayner’s work has quite a diferent emphasis I think, on renewal, innovation, resourcefulness. The fre integral to her work ‘Conversion’, never appears as destructive. The bale of biofuel at its centre, lives on through the work as the fre roars around it and is then absorbed back into it in an endless loop. So the fre is in efect the force which enables transformation from one medium into another, but we never see that happening, as the bale of straw-fuel never disappears. So, it is an illusion. The work doesn’t answer the question as to whether or not this is a good idea but it raises many questions, and it is an image, once again, that stuck in people’s minds very powerfully. Others of Jessica’s works tackled similar issues of apparent renewal. The ice block which I showed opposite ‘Conversion’ is called ‘Nothing is Destroyed’ and is chipped away to shards and then reappears as a block, endlessly repeating its life-death cycle. So it is not for me a cycle which is about mourning, but it expresses hope that we are not actually witnessing complete loss, but change, and that in order to understand the forces of change, we need to rethink our prejudices. That for me is a very strong message about climate change.

GF…I was also very interested in the varied locations of the works in the Fire and Ice show (Iceland, the US, Greenland…) and how important ideas of travel and journeying have been historically in work which considers the environment, whether as a narrative device as in Patrick Keiller’s ‘Robinson in Space’ or as a performative and explorative tool as in the work of many ‘land artists’ and contemporary ‘walking artists’ such as Francis Alys, Hamish Fulton and members of WAN (the Walking Arts Network). As an aside, Im also wondering how the economies of travel which are necessary to further research work in the humanities and sciences are both aided by narratives of globalisation and its ease of travel and at the same time troubled by air travels impact on climate change for example and how these tensions and contradictions can be managed…perhaps opening up new opportunities for engagement that can be both local and far reaching such as Chris Kraus’s propositions for radical localism1… I was wondering if you had any thoughts on the political implications of artists ‘travel’ and how these ideas may have changed post ‘Land art’?

VS The whole question of travel in the art world is fraught with contradictions. It was a problem for Cape Farewell, who were criticised for sending artists on expeditions to the Arctic, and that being in contrast with the idea of a low carbon economy necessary for mitigating some of the impacts of climate change. Yet, the role of the artist as ‘witness’ is a crucial and long-standing one. We need the authenticity and independence of vision that an artist can contribute, and not least, the willingness to be critical and both to take risks and portray them. For artists too of course, travel is an important professional development thing and means for inspiration. Gina and Jessica cemented their relationship as artists through their travels to Iceland. For Hilary Mayo, it enabled a complete change of direction, giving her work new force and imagery.

Land Art is also complex – depending on whether we are talking about the American or the British versions, which are deeply contradictory, the former being very much about dramatic reshaping of landscape and the latter about minimal and very personal intervention. Ditto, the whole notion of walking art, which can be equally about risk, about modernisim, history, location – depending on who you are talking about. I think that your Arts Territory Exchange, enabling virtual and locally based collaborations and initiatives, is one of the ways forward. There is a big localism movement developing, which I also have written about – and at best this can be about regeneration and understanding indigenous knowledge as well as valuing the minutiae of place.2

GF I was struck by a quote I read recently by Nancy Holt about her ‘Sun Tunnels’ (1977) in rural Utah, that the landscape ‘…could speak of walking on earth that has surely never been walked upon before,(evoking) a sense of being on this planet, rotating in space, in universal time’3. I was considering how our concept of time in ‘environmental art’ may have changed over the past 50 years, the idea of a universal time or being suspended in space in this way seems an impossibility now – due largely to the fact that environmental issues are far more pressing and urgent – the feeling that we are existing on a kind of borrowed time now the climate change tipping point4 has been passed and even if co2 ommisions were reduced completely, the damage already done is no longer reversible…I suppose I am wondering what these knowledges mean for contemporary arts practice and activism in general, especially in an age when the president of the United States denies climate change in favour of industry and economic development. So the idea of ‘universal’ time that Holt talks about has been perhaps been replaced by some kind of anxious and increasingly frenetic temporal landscape, and i’m interested in what this may mean for the making work and the need as talked about by artists such as Marina Abramovic to be inside of time and to suspend time somehow in order to carve out a space in which to make art…?

VS Regarding the notion about time, it depends very much on who you are looking at. For many artists now, the idea of deep time is more relevant than ever – look for example at the great interest

being shown in geology and eg. Doggerland – the prehistoric environment beneath the North Sea, or at the impact of development of the Anthropocene. Mind you, both these ideas speak of landscape that has very much been trodden – and that is the really big diference from Nancy Holt’s era. And I think that the Climate change and the feelings of human responsibility for it have very much led to and accelerated interest in these ideas about traces from former civilisations and the impact on the present – and how we read the past. I think that Marina Abramovic’s concerns come from a diferent place – being very sensitive to the autonomy of art, and the idea of the artist as author deeply within a protected practice, with a right to dip in and out of time at will. She may or may not share concerns about climate change, but I don’t see that as being primary for her, as much as the idea of Vanitas – focussing on life and death and on the limits of human life and experience.

GF …also in terms of audience engagement and ideas around ‘looking’, slowness is equally as important as an urgency in consumption, how as as curator do you balance the delivery of a message or the raising of awareness around environmental issues with the importance of the suspended time necessary for spectator engaging with the work? And how important is the delivery of a message to your remit as a gallery?

VS I love the whole idea of ‘slow’ – as in slow food, slow art – and I think it can also be applied to slow looking. But there is also an urgency in terms of the environment. They are not necessarily contradictory ideas though. In order to understand the environment and the issues we face in our relationships with it, we need to focus on its minutiae. In both cases, being slow often involves careful looking and engaging in conversation. I very much regard the gallery as a place for both and try to engage people in conversation, though of course silent contemplation is important too. Roger Ackling used to tell a wonderful story about the best tutorial he ever held at Chelsea with two artists, was a completely silent communion in front of their work. He had told them only to talk when they were ready and they saw no need. Silence can be a bit of an elite thing though – like minimal art – very much for those who already understand things deeply.

As for the environment and how I relate to it via the gallery, it is a question of watching listening and being attentive to what artists are doing and using the work of theirs that I show as a springboard for campaigning about issues it raises. That happens through conversations, discussions, colloquia, conferences, workshops. These have to work across disciplines and I am a great advocate for that, as a means to engage people beyond the confnes of the contemporary art world. I see the gallery as a place that bridges between specialists and non-specialists, and people of diferent specialisms. It is, and ought to be a social space, welcoming of diferent points of view. My space is intentionally hybrid – using the methods of a public gallery with the practices of a commercial one, i.e. being a shop, as it matters to me ethically to engage in the economy. Being on the high street is as important as being on the river. I am bringing international and global artistic and environmental concerns there, and I hope, a greater interest in how art can engage with environmental politics as well as with people’s daily lives.


Groundwork’s next exhibition Trash Art opens on the 9th of March and Veronika Sekules new book ‘Cultures of the Countryside, Art | Museum | Heritage | Environment ‘ is available now published by Routledge.


1Chris Krauss, 2012, Kelly Lake Store & Other Stories, Portland, Companion Editions.
2Veronica Sekules, 2018, Cultures of the Countryside, Art | Museum | Heritage | Environment, London and New York, Routledge.
3 Lucy Lippard, 1983, ‘Overlay – Contemporary Art and the Art of Pre-history’. NewYork.pantheon. page 106.
4 A few years ago, 400 parts per million for carbon dioxide was widely cited as the tipping point for climate change. Whether it’s a tipping point or a milestone, we have decisively passed it and CO2 levels appear certain to continue rising. Forbes www.forbes.com/sites/uhenergy/2017/03/16/. Article written by Earl J. Ritchie.

 

Apply Now: Nomad/9 Master of Fine Arts

The application period for the 2018 cohort of the Nomad/9 MFA in Interdisciplinary Art is now open. The application deadline for scholarship consideration is January 15, 2018.

PROGRAM BROCHURE


Program:
Created in 2015, Nomad/9 MFA program is a low-residency program offered by the Hartford Art School of the University of Hartford, with high-impact residencies that include ecology, history, and the craft-to-code technology continuum. The Nomad/9 MFA offers artists a revolutionary new way of engaging with their home community and other communities across the Americas, while preparing to address todays most pressing cultural and social issues through their work. This singular MFA program is dedicated to regenerative culture and built for the 21st century with dynamic, cross-disciplinary, experiential coursework at sites throughout the Americas, including El Salvador, New York City, Oakland, CA, Miami, FL, and Minneapolis/St. Paul.

Curriculum:
The Nomad/9 Interdisciplinary MFA curriculum brings together art, ecology, the technology continuum (from craft to code), and the study of history and culture. Featuring a rigorous critical discourse, the program includes artists from diverse creative disciplines on the faculty, and in the student cohort and supports art practices in craft, social practice, eco-art, design, art and healing, and community engagement. The 26-month, accredited program uses a living classroom approach to hands-on learning. During each residency, students engage in a reciprocal relationship with the site, learning from local practitioners and contributing to regional initiatives. Each site fosters awareness of the histories, cultures, and ecosystems present. Between residencies, students continue their practices independently while working closely with faculty.

Faculty:
Faculty and visiting artists include curators, educators, program managers, designers, and active visual, multimedia, performance, and video artists: Christine Baeumler, Cat Balco, John Bielenberg, Amanda Carlson, Mark Dion, Ted Efremoff, Christy Gast, Hope Ginsburg, Gene Gort, Muriel Hasbun, Pablo Helguera, Seitu Jones, Amanda Lovelee, Shanai Matteson, Mary Mattingly, Colin McMullan, Nomad/9 Director Carol Padberg, Ernesto Pujol, Allison Smith, Mona Smith, Sandy Spieler, Linda Weintraub, Nico Wheadon, and Caroline Woolard. In a time of rapid environmental, social, and economic change, the Nomad/9 program is dedicated to providing artists with an education that goes beyond the art world. In 2016, Nomad/9s first-year learning experiences included green woodworking in a forest classroom; a workshop on materiality, death, and regeneration; and and experiencing North American indigenous knowledge systems with Dakota teachers.

More Information:

Information on applying, and Nomad/9 MFAs generous merit scholarships, can be found at nomad9mfa.org. Interested students may call (860) 768 4639 for more information.

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https://www.instagram.com/nomad9_mfa/
https://twitter.com/nomad_9

Artists Residency in Luxembourg on ‘Disruption: the Imprint of Man’ mentored by Callum Innes

The European Investment Bank (EIB) Institute is pleased to announce the 2018 edition of its Artists Development Programme (ADP), looking for ONE visual artist (born after 1 January, 1983) from an EU Member State to work on the theme of “Disruption: The Imprint of Man”.

The ADP offers emerging European visual artists a 5-6 week-long residency in Luxembourg, enabling them to develop their practice and create a new (body of) work(s), boosted by the mentorship of a high-profile established artist. In 2018, the recipients will each be mentored by acclaimed British artist Callum Innes.

ADP 2017 laureates with Callum Innes

Eligibility
•Being born after 1 January, 1983
•EU nationality
•Fluency in English

Budget and Duration
The EIB Institute will cover the artist’s travel costs to and from Luxembourg (residency), and to and from Callum Innes’s studio (before the start of the residency). The artist will receive a stipend (EUR 100 per day to cover living costs and production) and will be provided with a living/working space. Upon starting the residency the artist will be given an additional production budget of EUR 500 and at the end of the residency will receive a success fee of EUR 1 000, provided he/she has produced an artwork. The residency in Luxembourg will take place in May/June 2018.
Upon completion of the residency, the EIB may acquire the artwork(s) produced on-site from the artist.

Application Procedure
Requirements
– CV (in English)
– Scanned copy of the passport or identity card of the applicant evidencing nationality of one of the 28 Member States
– A letter of motivation, in English, with ideas to be explored during the residency, in line with the proposed theme (maximum 500 words)
– Portfolio of visual documentation of works, maximum 8 images, best representing the art of the applicant (in PDF format, A4 pages)
– Names and contact details of two professional referees familiar with the art of the applicant
– A brief reference in the body of the email to how the applicant found out about the programme

Selection Procedure
A jury – consisting of Callum Innes (the mentor), external art advisers and members of the EIB Arts Committee – will select the candidate based on the artistic quality of his/her work, his/her motivation, the potential to make the most of the opportunity offered by the residency and the relevance of the applicant’s practice to the cultural context of the EIB Institute.

The selected candidate will be informed of the jury’s decision via email in February 2018.

Application deadline: Midnight (GMT+1), 3 January, 2018.
Any application failing to comply with the set requirements will be automatically disqualified.

Applications should be sent electronically to Ms Delphine Munro (arts@eib.org)

Additional information:

https://institute.eib.org/2017/11/call-for-application-for-the-artists-development-programme-2018-disruption-the-imprint-of-man/

Open Call: Creative Design Proposal

Collaborative building and design summer camp, Beam Camp, seeks fantastical proposals from creative individuals and teams, including but not limited to Artists, Designers, Filmmakers, Architects, Builders, Engineers, Musicians, Fabricators & Technologists.

Beam Camp is looking for the following:

  • Fantastical proposals from creative individuals and teams, including but not limited to Artists, Designers, Filmmakers, Architects, Builders, Engineers, Musicians, Fabricators & Technologists.
  • Visionary ideas that culminate with a unique, ambitious, and spectacular product.
  • Proposals that communicate a clear vision (sketches, diagrams, and other visuals are always helpful) and represent your/your team’s expertise.
  • Projects that:
    1. allow Beam Camp to create the majority of the components onsite and from scratch
    2. utilize a range of materials, processes and techniques
    3. take advantage of Beam’s facilities, community, landscape, and rural setting

Beam Camp Disciplines and Facilities include:

  • Full wood and metal shops, equipped with a range of hand and power tools
  • Welding facilities
  • Textile, dye and sewing stations
  • Ceramic studio
  • Molding and casting facilities
  • Performance space
  • Technology lab
  • Audio equipment and instrument selection
  • Food Garden and Commercial Kitchen

Project Proposals must include:

  • The title of your proposal, accompanied by a brief description of the project (3 sentences)
  • A detailed description of the project, along with applicable visuals (sketches, diagrams, renderings, etc. are encouraged)
  • Information about all the participants: names, emails, experience (resume, CV, portfolio, etc.) and phone numbers of everyone involved

You are NOT required to:

  • Include nature, children, or camp as a theme in your project proposal
  • Provide a detailed breakdown of how your project would be realized by 100 Beam campers (that’s our job)
  • Be at Beam for the entire camp session if your proposal is chosen; the length of your visit depends on your schedule and the needs of the project

Budget and Expectations:

  • Project Designers will receive a stipend of $3,000.
  • Project Designers will be reimbursed for all reasonable travel costs related to site visits
  • Beam Camp will allot a budget of $12,500 for Project materials and expenses, including those related to prototyping and design
  • Project Designers should have a general understanding of the processes, techniques and materials involved in their proposal
  • Project Designers must be available for weekly Skype meetings January 30 through June 30 in order to facilitate any necessary development, prototyping and problem solving
  • Project Designers must be able to provide plans according to the project schedule

Schedule:


Wednesday, 25 October 2017: 2018 Beam Project RFP opens
Sunday, 7 January 2018: RFP closes; all proposals must be submitted by 11:59pm EST
Wednesday, 17 January 2018: Exploratory meetings scheduled with all selected semi-finalists
Tuesday, 30 January 2018: Project Designers are selected
Friday, 1 June 2018: Final project plans/blueprints due
28 June—22 July and 26 July—19 August 2018: Projects are realized at Beam Camp

Project Proposals must be:

  • Compiled into one document
  • Submitted in .pdf or .doc/.docx format using the form on their website.
  • Submitted no later than 11:59PM EST on Sunday, January 7th, 2018

Incomplete proposals will not be considered; please make sure yours is complete before submitting. If you have any questions regarding the proposal process, acceptable formats, or anything else, please do not hesitate to contact Beam Camp at:  projectproposals [at] beamcamp.org

SUBMIT NOW

About Beam Camp:

Beam Camp is a collaborative building and design summer camp in Strafford, NH that works with kids aged 10-17 to make the seemingly impossible possible. Our award-winning program has been featured in the New York Times, Wired, NPR, and designboom, and offers young people the opportunity to cultivate hands-on skills while exploring innovative thinking, design, problem solving and the creative process.

An intergalactic salvage station struck by a meteor, a solar-powered cinematic riff on a French film from 1902, a 2-story arboreal kaleidoscope: every year, Beam Camp solicits proposals for unique and spectacular large-scale projects that serve as the centerpiece for a 25-day session of camp, during which they are built and brought to life by 100 campers and staff. Our Project Team works with the winning designers (Project Designers) to translate their designs into the camp context. Precision of craft, skill, and imaginative thinking are paramount in our projects and the work of our staff and campers — please take some time to familiarize yourself with our past projects.

Cash, Clash, & Climate Exhibition Extended Until 26th November!

MASLEN & MEHRA in collaboration with street artists, Shuby and Delete
1 September – EXTENDED until 26th November

Hastings Museum & Art Gallery
John’s Place, Hastings TN34

Maslen & Mehra consider their more recent work to be ‘micro’. By that, they mean they are honing in on very specific political and environmental dilemmas. This requires a completely different methodology to previous work in order to explore detailed narratives. The sculptures in their current series have been based on ceramic plates researched in museums around the world. These include the Victoria & Albert and British Museums, London; Hastings Museum, UK; Mares Museum, Barcelona; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Archaeological Museum and the Turkish and Islamic Art Museum, Istanbul; the Asian Museum of Civilization in Singapore and the Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza, Italy. Maslen & Mehra fashion the sculptures from humble materials: wire and papier-mâché, completed with a decoupage technique of small tiles of archival prints. The narrative of each original plate is altered to highlight a variety of ideas tied to three themes: Cash, Clash and Climate.

The Cash series draws attention to bank bailouts; Doughnut Economics; credit culture; housing bubbles; tampon tax; quantitative easing; war as big business; the commodification of food staples; and the almost religious status that money has reached in our times. The Clash series embodies social unrest from London to Athens; Article 475; the refugee crisis; Grenfell; Greece and the Eurozone; social media to organise protests; fracking; gun control vs gun rights; and the Dakota Access Pipeline.  Lastly, the Climate series highlights environmental topics such as global coral bleaching events; chronic pollution as a heavy cost for economic power in China; melting ice caps; the opposing views of climate change; El Niño; Natural Capital; and the legacy of radiation from Japan’s nuclear disaster in Fukushima. The artists have made bespoke stands for the sculptures and invited local street artists, Shuby and Delete, to add to their surfaces, responding to each theme. This exhibition at the Hastings Museum draws together pieces from the three collections for the first time, representing years of work.

The sculptures individually pose questions about political, social and economic structures but together they ask how they, in turn, relate to social unrest and environmental issues. Some themes may be familiar to the viewer such as the piece, Polarized, which confronts us with opposing slogans: ‘Global warming is a cruel hoax’ and ‘Climate can’t wait’. Others are less obvious, such as the piece Article 475 which encourages the viewer to look further if they don’t understand the reference. Faith in Fiat questions the shift from commodity money to a fiat system which is effectively a promise. Is it sustainable to have such blind faith? The largest piece in the collection, Natural Capital references a system by which natural assets (water, geology, biodiversity, soil, air) and ecosystem services (pollination by insects, recreation, natural flood defences etc.) are given a financial value. Could this alternate economic system be the key? Maslen & Mehra have created the framework Cash, Clash and Climate in order to ponder questions about the complexities of living today and they invite viewers to follow their train of thought.

Hasting Museum and Art Gallery has an extensive ceramics collection. This exhibition will be in the newly refurbished Ceramics Gallery which showcases pottery production over the past 5000 years.

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery
Telephone: 01424 451052
Or you can contact us via Twitter or Facebook
https://twitter.com/hastings_museum
https://www.facebook.com/HBC-Hastings-Museum-Art-Gallery-218155741717952/

Admission is free. We are open all year:
April – October: Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 5pmSunday 12noon – 5pm. Last admission 4.30pm
November – March: Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 4pmSunday 12noon – 4pm. Last admission 3.30pm
The Museum has full wheelchair access throughout and disabled toilet facilities.
Free parking available outside Museum, including 1 disabled parking bay.



MASLEN & MEHRA Biography



Tim Maslen (b. 1968, Australia) studied Fine Art at Curtin University, Perth and completed an MA at Goldsmiths University, London in 1997. Jennifer Mehra (b. 1970, London) studied Fine Art at City Art Institute, Sydney and the National Arts School, Australia. Mehra was a founder of VOID, an East London artists’ – run space, which staged dozens of exhibitions for four years from 1997 – 2000.

Maslen & Mehra have worked collaboratively since 2000. They are recipients of a grant award from the Arts Council of England for their ongoing work Cash, Clash & Climate (2015 – 2017). Work from this series was included in an exhibition curated by Jenni Lomax, Melanie Manchot and Brian Cass at the Towner Contemporary (July 2016). They exhibited work from this series in the exhibition The Fall Of The Rebel Angels in Venice in 2015.

In 2014, they staged a solo exhibition at Lucy Bell Gallery for the Hastings Photo Festival. They were selected by Paul Noble for Creekside, London 2013, and were included in LUMINOUSFLUX at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery as part of the Perth International Arts Festival. In 2011, they were shortlisted for the Latitude Contemporary Art Prize alongside Graham Dolphin, Delaine Le Bas, Andy Harper and Alice Anderson.

The work of Maslen & Mehra can be found in collections such as Tattinger Switzerland, Galila Collection Brussels, Art EsCollecion Madrid, numerous international private collections and the Altered Landscape Collection, Nevada Museum of Art. Maslen & Mehra are featured in the stunning accompanying book titled The Altered Landscape published by Rizzoli.

Solo exhibitions have been staged in New York, London, Paris, Rome, Barcelona, Dubai, Istanbul, Toronto, Perth, Sydney and Berlin. In 2011 there was a solo presentation of their work for the Scotiabank CONTACT International Festival, Toronto. A monograph, Mirrored – Maslen & Mehra was published by Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg in 2008 with texts by Hamburger Bahnhof Museum Curator, Eugen Blume and art historian, Edward Lucie-Smith. Earlier projects include an installation at the Frissiras Museum, Athens during the Olympics (2004), a sculpture installation exhibited at Artspace, Sydney (2002), and a solo project at Dilston Grove, London achieved with awards from the Henry Moore Foundation and London Arts (2001).

Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are pleased to announce a special offer for registered (and not-yet-registered) attendees for The Green Arts Conference. 

Cryptic, a member of the Green Arts Initiative, is offering a discount to attend the opening night of their climate-change-themed music/theatre production Shorelines, which follows directly from the conference drinks reception at 7.30pm on November 1st at Tramway in Glasgow.

About Shorelines

Shorelines is part of Sonica 2017, and has strong sustainability themes, exploring the impacts of a natural disaster, and mankind’s relationship with the natural world. As part of the Green Arts Conference this year, we’ll be exploring the artistic programming emerging along such themes (including hearing from artist Kathy Hinde, also part of Sonica 2017), and this is an opportunity for you to see some of it for yourself.

The Green Arts Conference

The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability is crafted specifically for those working on sustainability in organisations in the cultural sector, and those interested in the intersections between the arts and sustainability. This full-day conference will explore current best practice, and deliver practical, hands-on workshops on topics such as travel recording; staff green team engagement, and carbon management planning for arts organisations. Perfect for green champions in the arts, screen and creative industries, and for members of the Green Arts Initiative.

Delegates for the Green Arts Conference can get tickets for Shorelines on 1st November for £8 (instead of £15), contact us for details.

Find out more about Shorelines

Book your place at The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability

 



The post Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Fermynwoods Contemporary Art Launches Art Work Placement

Fermynwoods Contemporary Art launches Art Work Placement –
Art and Creativity driving innovation and change in Northamptonshire businesses

Northamptonshire organisation Fermynwoods Contemporary Art has launched Art Work Placement, a pioneering initiative in collaboration with a group of key businesses in the County. For the first time, 5 professional artists will be placed in 5 of Northamptonshire’s key businesses to help employees develop creative solutions to today’s business challenges. Funded by Arts Council England, Art Work Placement is an innovative, new idea involving artists working with the businesses to explore how integrating art into daily working life can not only enrich the workplace, but create change.

During each Art Work Placement residency the artists will be meeting staff and making art work and, as a result, understand how creativity makes a difference in finding new ways of thinking about the workplace and company culture. The programme is inspired by Fermynwoods’ aim to ensure that art infiltrates every day life and by the belief, shared by their business partners, that the arts and culture an essential part of making Northamptonshire a great place to live, work, play and learn.

The artists are all Associates Artists with Fermynwoods and the four residencies confirmed to date are:

Art Work Placement is being delivered by Fermynwoods with Culture Consultant, Morag Ballantyne, and Organisational Psychologist, Kirstin Irving.

Director of Fermynwoods Contemporary Art, Yasmin Canvin, said, “We are delighted to have had such a positive and enthusiastic reaction to Art Work Placement from businesses across the County. Artists are specialists in helping us to see the world differently and looking between the lines, so the expectation is that artists working in these organisation can help unlock further innovation and creativity”.

Nick Greenway, Director of Marketing for the iconic Northamptonshire motorsport and engineering company, Cosworth, added: “As a business we know that in order to succeed we need imagination, innovation and creativity, but we also need to retain the very best talent, that’s a source of business advantage – and, of course, we want our staff to be happy and motivated. I’m excited at seeing how having Virginie working with us challenges us to capture what we’re about and to see it more clearly”.

Fermynwoods and the participating businesses expect to see a range of benefits to communication and productivity as well as contributing to quality of life at work and the wellbeing of staff.


About Fermynwoods Contemporary Art:

Fermynwoods Contemporary Art commissions innovative and meaningful ways for
visual artists to engage with audiences, in public spaces across Northamptonshire and
online. Recent projects have included: The Twelfth Player, a collaboration
with Northampton Town Football Club and Royal&amp;Dernagte, which blended film and live
performance to take audiences on an immersive tour of Sixfields Stadium; and Space
Programme, when young people worked with artists to launch thermochromatic
sculptures 20,000km into space and document the journey.
www.fermynwoods.org

[Int21] Residential Short Course and Evening Talk (UK)

Environmental artist Chris Drury and writer Kay Syrad lead a residential short course with guest artist David Buckland from Monday 30 October to Friday 3 November 2017. Chris will also offer a public talk on the evening of Wednesday November 1st.

Part of art.earth’s compelling new programme of short courses and talks. Context and Form, Art and Writing is facilitated by Chris Drury and Kay Syrad. Their special guest is David Buckland, Founding Director of Cape Farewell. Both events take place at Dartington in SW England and are open to all.

In this five-day intensive, Chris Drury shares his renowned practice of working with form, including whirlpool and vortex, fractal and wave patterns, exploring and investigating how aesthetic forms have the universal enfolded within them but are at the same time particular to individual experience.

Kay Syrad has collaborated closely with Chris on a number of art-text projects and brings her rich knowledge and experience of narrative and poetic form.

The programme days assume a regular pattern of immersion in the landscape: walking, collecting, making; reflecting and working inside, with short lectures, shared conversation and discussion, individual tuition, and studio time exploring visual and/or written forms that are personal and universal.

The course includes:
– a series of short lectures on context and form in art and writing
– meditative and sense-based engagement with the landscape
– a chance to experiment together and individually with different forms in language and image
– the opportunity to work outside and inside in dialogue with the tutors

Further information and booking can be found at http://artdotearth.org/context-and-form-art-and-writing/

On the Wednesday evening, Chris Drury will offer a public talk Wandering: earth, art and context.
Tickets are £5 and information can be found at http://artdotearth.org/chris-drury-wandering-earth-art-and-context/

500 Years of Resistance Presented By: Dancing Earth Creations and Cuicacalli Dance Company

“500 YEARS OF RESISTANCE”

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — Dancing Earth Creations in collaboration with Cuicacalli Dance Company are proud to present “500 Years of Resistance” Festival at the newly renovated Brava Theater in the Mission District in San Francisco on Dec 1-2, 2017 . The Festival celebrates the tenth anniversary of the Cuicacalli Danza, the associate year round training program of Dancing Earth.

Two different programs will be presented from December 1-2, 2017 :

  • The Opening Night concert on December 1st will focus on contemporary Indigenous choreographies with themes of; honoring of Native land and water rights  and honoring of treaties,  the renewal of ancestral ties though memory and dreaming; the spiritual, cultural and practical exploration of notions of Renewable Energy; diasporic resilience and resistance in solidarity with all struggles and commonality of people of color; and resistance prayers and  protests tied to local issues advised by our California First Nations consultants.
  • The Closing Night concert on December 2nd features brilliant full  scale production of Ballet Folklorico Mexicano by Cuicacalli Dance Company, as created and directed by Jesús “JACOH” Cortés, former soloist with Ballet Folklorico de Mexico, as well as select contemporary Indigenous choreographies

    (Cuicacalli Dance Company Performance Photo by Robbie Sweeny)

The programs will be featuring Dancing Earth’s collaborating Indigenous performing artists, Cuicacalli professional danzantes and advanced apprentices, special  guest artists, and our honored cultural artist ambassadors of local California First Nations including Ohlone, Pomo and Wappo.

This festival is made possible by San Francisco Arts Commission grants, in-kind support from Dance Mission and Brava Theater, and the immeasurable cultural legacy of our Indigenous cultural consultants and collaborators.

(Cuicacalli Dance Company Performance Photo by Robbie Sweeny)

Calendar Listing:

WHO:   Dancing Earth,  Cuicacalli Dance Company and guest artists including local California       First Nations honored representatives

WHAT:   “500 Years of Resistance” Festival

WHEN:   Program A, Dec. 1 , 2017 ; Program B Dec.  2, 2017

TIME:   7 pm

WHERE:    Brava Theater, 2781 24th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110

WEBSITE:   https://www.brava.org/visit

WHY:   On the days following Native history month— and the national holiday   known as Thanksgiving by some, but known as ThanksTaking by many– we reclaim  the mythology on which this holiday has been imagined with vital and compelling truths of Indigenous survival and resilience of the original peoples of , as well as inter-tribal and Indigenous people who have made the Bay Area their home.

We honor and embody local and hemispheric resistance efforts protecting Indigenous eco-cultural rights to exist, with vibrant rituals of contemporary Indigenous dance that celebrates our continuance, and welcomes community to gather in solidarity and unity.



Ticket Details:



$30 – General Tickets

$25 – Advance Tickets

$20 – for Students with ID, seniors, and youth under 10 yrs old

*Ticket covers cost of Performance and helps support scholarships for deserving low income students of Cuicacalli Dance Company

Tickets are available after October 15 at https://www.brava.org/ or call 415-641-7657

Website: www.dancingearth.org

About “ 500 Years Of Resistance “

INTENTION: To offer dances as vital contemporary  rituals for transformation that  heighten awareness and understanding of Indigenous presence and issues for our extended Bay Area community. At this important time in history, Native people are being recognized as the leaders of the ecological movement by bringing spiritual, cultural and creative resonance,  connecting all living beings.

INSPIRATION: We honor the rich heritage of California First Nations’ songs and dances that have kept the land, waters, and all living beings in balance and harmony until colonial times. We are energized by the history of inter-tribal solidarity such as the 1970s takeover of Alcatraz, commemorated annually with gatherings on Indigenous Peoples Day and Thanks(Taking) Day, with this performance falling just after that national holiday. Rich source material emerges from consultation with inter-tribal elders, culture carriers, and activists, as well as individual Indigenous artists bringing their unique cultural perspective to the collaborative creative process in a shimmering mosaic of historical and ancestral memory, imagined futurities, and embodied present.

CREATIVE PROCESS: Dancing Earth works closely with Indigenous collaborators and inter-tribal elders and consultants including representatives of regional California First Nations with creative explorations in seasonal intensives at indoor and outdoor locations,  activating the inner and outer landscapes in a process  described by Dancing Earth’s Founding Director and Choreographer, Rulan Tangen, as “Re-Story-ing”

About Dancing Earth and Director Rulan Tangen:

(On Photo: Rulan Tangen, Dancing Earth Images)

DIRECTOR BIO: RULAN TANGEN (Director, Choreographer, Dancer) is an internationally accomplished dance artist and the Founding Artistic Director and Choreographer of DANCING EARTH. As a performer and choreographer, she has worked in ballet, modern dance, circus, TV, film, theater, opera and Native contemporary productions in the United States, Canada, France, Norway, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina.

Her work values movement as an expression of Indigenous worldview,  honoring  matriarchal leadership, dance as functional ritual for transformation and healing, the process of decolonizing the body, and the animistic energetic connection with all forms of life on Earth. She has recruited and nurtured a new generation of Indigenous contemporary dancers and holds the belief that “to dance is to live, to live is to dance.”

Rulan has been recognized with:

  • Costo Medal for Education, Research and Service by UC Riverside’s Chair of Native Affairs
  • Native Arts and Cultures Foundation for their first dance Fellowship for Artistic Innovation
  • Top ten finalist across all disciplines for Nathan Cummings Fellowship for Social ChangeArts and Healing Network’s Arts for Social Change Award
  • A Blade Of Grass fellowship for socially engaged art
  • Nomination for Action in Film award

In April 2018, she is honored to be a recipient  of the Kennedy Center Citizen Artist Award.

(On Photo: Rulan Tangen, Dancing Earth Images)

ABOUT DANCING EARTH:

DANCING EARTH (DE) debuted at Dance Mission in 2004 and has emerged as a unique force in the dance world. DE’s work gathers inter-tribal collaborators to re-envision contemporary dance, embodying Indigenous ecological philosophies with renewed relevance as evidenced by extensive national and international touring invitations.

Director Tangen’s founding vision for DE is to serve a need not met in the United States, giving hope and opportunity to Native talent who are outside of mainstream performance because of lack of access and resources. As Native dancers, composers, customers, filmmakers, and spoken word artists, we challenge notions of what comprises a professional artist, the role of the audience, and the boundaries and purpose of performance. Our tribal values honor dance and songs as essential ritual for transformation which we expand to socio-environmental change. Reviewer T. Hassett  describes Dancing Earth as having “Taken the beauty, power, and wit of that sensibility further, combining powwow, ballet, modern dance, circus arts, capoeira, and b-boying into something acutely mythological.”

We are one of few companies who work with Native communities in gymnasiums and open spaces for people who may have never seen theatrical dance as well as in festivals in Opera houses for audiences who have never met a Native person. We also serve our circles with extensive local and national dance instruction, engagement workshops, and community-made art.

We dance the rich diversity of our contemporary heritage with the intent to promote ecological awareness, cultural diversity, healing and understanding between peoples. Our aesthetic embodies the spirituality inherent on Earth, and is created by, with, and for the land and the peoples of the land.

Recognition include:

  • Medallions from the US Embassy for Cultural Ambassadorship
  • National Museum of American Indian’s Expressive Arts Award
  • Mention as one of ”25 To Watch” by Dance Magazine
  • National Dance Project’s Production and Touring awards in 2009 and 2016
  • MAP FUND award for GROUNDWORKS, a project to debut in Bay Area in 2018

DE evokes critical review such as that found in Santa Fe’s THE magazine: “The visionary note easily persists in the accomplished miracles of speed, agility, grace, and sensuality that articulate … Rulan Tangen’s extraordinary choreography.”

(Dancing Earth Images)

About Cuicacalli Compania and Director Jesus Jacoh Cortes

DIRECTOR BIO: Jesús “JACOH” Cortés, began his training in Mexican folk dance when he was 6 years old under the direction of his great uncle, Juan Natoli. In 2000, he started dancing with Ballet Folklórico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez in the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City after he was trained as a Deer Dancer under the direction of Lucas Zarate Lobato. He was a soloist in the role of The Deer Dance “La Danza Del Venado” for Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez, and has toured Mexico, Europe and the United States. He was the company choreographer and lead teacher for Los Niños de Santa Fe y Compañia. In addition to performance, he has also taught hundreds of elementary school children as part of the Arts in the Schools program in Española, New Mexico.

Currently, Jacoh lives in San Francisco and works as an artist in residence with the SFUSD and Brava Theater. He is founder and Artistic Director of Cuicacalli (meaning House of Culture in Nahuatl dialect), and is a lead teacher and choreographer for Dancing Earth. In the Bay he has been a Guest Artist/Instructor/Choreographer/Consultant with initiatives including San Francisco Symphony,  Printz Dance Project, ALICE (Arts and Literacy in Children’s Education) program, “Burning Libraries,” Mystical Abyss, Sonoma Ballet, and  Ballet Folklorico de Stanford University. His Cuicacalli Escuela and Dance Company, has been presented by D.I.R.T. Festival, Festival of Latin American Contemporary Choreographers, Baile en la Calle, SF Son Jaroche, Cuba Caribe and CARNAVAL.

Notable recognition:

  • Director/Choreographer Cortes and Music Director Ariana Cortes led students who were selected as the only youth group ever to place in professional level as Carnaval second place winners!
  • Recognition of Sr Cortes’ version of ‘Danza Del Venado with an  acclaimed IZZY award.
  • Sr Cortes was recognized with Dream Catcher award for excellence in the arts by SF School District in 2017.

ABOUT CUICACALLI :

CUICACALLI “House of Culture” is a year-round youth training program, in association with DANCING EARTH, the nation’s foremost Indigenous contemporary dance ensemble.  Founded in 2008 by renowned international performer Jesus “Jacoh” Cortes, CUICACALLI is an international, cross-cultural, dance-arts educational institution.

CUICACALLI carries strongly its mission to serve the diverse community of San Francisco with dedication towards excellent instruction, performances and community programs, for intergenerational students, artists and audiences of all backgrounds. CUICACALLI builds communities through dance- expanding, exploring, and celebrating the cultural traditions of the Americas. Self expression, confidence enthusiasm, discipline, focus, cooperation, teamwork and positive attitude are amongst the life qualities encouraged in all CUICACALLI classes. The offering of versatile dance styles give students a well-rounded curriculum of body awareness, movement dynamics, strength, flexibility, spatial composition, and the appreciation for the vibrant cultural rhythms that are the pulse of Latino/Indio life.

Advanced students become eligible for apprenticeship with CUICACALLI DANCE COMPANY  and Dancing Earth. The COMPANY  is inspired by cultural traditions and their development to the modern days, Cuicacalli develops choreographies to revive traditions, social and environmental situations, or simply give a look to the daily life with an abstract motion. As a multi disciplinary dance company, CUICACALLI fuses various styles into a unique story of their own. By including dance styles such as Indigenous, Folkloric, Contemporary, Cuicacalli hopes to expose, sustain, and expand traditional and modern dancing with a new lens.

***JESUS CORTES IS A BILINGUAL SPANISH-ENGLISH SPEAKER AND IS AVAILABLE FOR SPANISH LANGUAGE INTERVIEWS  

(Photos of Artistic Directors , all copyright courtesy of photographer Elizabeth Oplaenik for Dancing Earth Creations)

Exhibition: Cash, Clash & Climate (U.K.)

CASH, CLASH & CLIMATE 

MASLEN & MEHRA in collaboration with street artists, Shuby and Delete
1 September – 12 November 2017
Opening event: 14th September 2017
Hastings Museum & Art Gallery
John’s Place
Hastings TN34

Maslen & Mehra consider their more recent work to be ‘micro’. By that, they mean they are honing in on very specific political and environmental dilemmas. This requires a completely different methodology to previous work in order to explore detailed narratives. The sculptures in their current series have been based on ceramic plates researched in museums around the world. These include the Victoria & Albert and British Museums, London; Hastings Museum, UK; Mares Museum, Barcelona; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Archaeological Museum and the Turkish and Islamic Art Museum, Istanbul; the Asian Museum of Civilization in Singapore and the Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche in Faenza, Italy. Maslen & Mehra fashion the sculptures from humble materials: wire and papier-mâché, completed with a decoupage technique of small tiles of archival prints. The narrative of each original plate is altered to highlight a variety of ideas tied to three themes: Cash, Clash and Climate.

The Cash series draws attention to bank bailouts; Doughnut Economics; credit culture; housing bubbles; tampon tax; quantitative easing; war as big business; the commodification of food staples; and the almost religious status that money has reached in our times. The Clash series embodies social unrest from London to Athens; Article 475; the refugee crisis; Grenfell; Greece and the Eurozone; social media to organise protests; fracking; gun control vs gun rights; and the Dakota Access Pipeline.  Lastly, the Climate series highlights environmental topics such as global coral bleaching events; chronic pollution as a heavy cost for economic power in China; melting ice caps; the opposing views of climate change; El Niño; Natural Capital; and the legacy of radiation from Japan’s nuclear disaster in Fukushima. The artists have made bespoke stands for the sculptures and invited local street artists, Shuby and Delete, to add to their surfaces, responding to each theme. This exhibition at the Hastings Museum draws together pieces from the three collections for the first time, representing years of work.

The sculptures individually pose questions about political, social and economic structures but together they ask how they, in turn, relate to social unrest and environmental issues. Some themes may be familiar to the viewer such as the piece, Polarized, which confronts us with opposing slogans: ‘Global warming is a cruel hoax’ and ‘Climate can’t wait’. Others are less obvious, such as the piece Article 475 which encourages the viewer to look further if they don’t understand the reference. Faith in Fiat questions the shift from commodity money to a fiat system which is effectively a promise. Is it sustainable to have such blind faith? The largest piece in the collection, Natural Capital references a system by which natural assets (water, geology, biodiversity, soil, air) and ecosystem services (pollination by insects, recreation, natural flood defences etc.) are given a financial value. Could this alternate economic system be the key? Maslen & Mehra have created the framework Cash, Clash and Climate in order to ponder questions about the complexities of living today and they invite viewers to follow their train of thought.

Hasting Museum and Art Gallery has an extensive ceramics collection. This exhibition will be in the newly refurbished Ceramics Gallery which showcases pottery production over the past 5000 years.

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery
Telephone: 01424 451052
Or you can contact us via Twitter or Facebook
https://twitter.com/hastings_museum
https://www.facebook.com/HBC-Hastings-Museum-Art-Gallery-218155741717952/

Admission is free. We are open all year:
April – October: Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 5pmSunday 12noon – 5pm. Last admission 4.30pm
November – March: Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 4pmSunday 12noon – 4pm. Last admission 3.30pm
The Museum has full wheelchair access throughout and disabled toilet facilities.
Free parking available outside Museum, including 1 disabled parking bay.

Faith In Fiat

Installation on view at the Towner Art Gallery.
22 July – 1 October 2017.
The summer exhibition has been selected by Richard Billingham (artist), Rosie Cooper (curator De La Warr Pavilion) and Brian Cass (curator Towner).

Open TuesdaySunday and Bank Holiday Mondays. 10.00am-5.00pm
Devonshire Park
College Road
Eastbourne
BN21 4JJ



MASLEN & MEHRA Biography



Tim Maslen (b. 1968, Australia) studied Fine Art at Curtin University, Perth and completed an MA at Goldsmiths University, London in 1997. Jennifer Mehra (b. 1970, London) studied Fine Art at City Art Institute, Sydney and the National Arts School, Australia. Mehra was a founder of VOID, an East London artists’ – run space, which staged dozens of exhibitions for four years from 1997 – 2000.

Maslen & Mehra have worked collaboratively since 2000. They are recipients of a grant award from the Arts Council of England for their ongoing work Cash, Clash & Climate (2015 – 2017). Work from this series was included in an exhibition curated by Jenni Lomax, Melanie Manchot and Brian Cass at the Towner Contemporary (July 2016). They exhibited work from this series in the exhibition The Fall Of The Rebel Angels in Venice in 2015.

In 2014, they staged a solo exhibition at Lucy Bell Gallery for the Hastings Photo Festival. They were selected by Paul Noble for Creekside, London 2013, and were included in LUMINOUSFLUX at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery as part of the Perth International Arts Festival. In 2011, they were shortlisted for the Latitude Contemporary Art Prize alongside Graham Dolphin, Delaine Le Bas, Andy Harper and Alice Anderson.

The work of Maslen & Mehra can be found in collections such as Tattinger Switzerland, Galila Collection Brussels, Art EsCollecion Madrid, numerous international private collections and the Altered Landscape Collection, Nevada Museum of Art. Maslen & Mehra are featured in the stunning accompanying book titled The Altered Landscape published by Rizzoli.

Solo exhibitions have been staged in New York, London, Paris, Rome, Barcelona, Dubai, Istanbul, Toronto, Perth, Sydney and Berlin. In 2011 there was a solo presentation of their work for the Scotiabank CONTACT International Festival, Toronto. A monograph, Mirrored – Maslen & Mehra was published by Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg in 2008 with texts by Hamburger Bahnhof Museum Curator, Eugen Blume and art historian, Edward Lucie-Smith. Earlier projects include an installation at the Frissiras Museum, Athens during the Olympics (2004), a sculpture installation exhibited at Artspace, Sydney (2002), and a solo project at Dilston Grove, London achieved with awards from the Henry Moore Foundation and London Arts (2001).