MELD

Footprint Modulation art exhibition – climate justice and human migration | Kooj Chuhan

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Footprint Modulation: the film

A journey through the ground-breaking exhibitionFootprint Modulation’ of art and interventions exploring Climate Change, Global Justice and Migration.  A project which connects artists and cultural venues with researchers, activists, communities and documentary media to interrogate, expose, humanise and discuss one of the big issues confronting us today and increasingly in the future.  Connecting art, climate, migration: documentary film by Kooj Chuhan.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro 'EXIT' hiresAdj_s

Speaking in the film: Prof David Held, Prof Wendy Brown, Dr Elizabeth Ferris, Dr Andrew Baldwin, Dr François Gemenne, Dr Ilan Kelman, Kooj Chuhan, Craig Barclay, Shahidul Alam, Apu and Murad Chowdhury, Alex Randall (UKCCMC), Dr Koko Warner, Sonali Narang, Dr Ademola Oluborode Jegede, Tracey Zengeni, Mazaher R, Jane Trowell (Platform), Sai Murray, Selina Nwulu, Dave Douglass, Janet Stewart.

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Thanks to all the artists and venues, speakers including Dave Douglass (Durham Miners’ Association) and Janet Stewart (CVAC), and special thanks to Maya Chowdhry, Mazaher R, Charlotte Lee, Mark Ruddell, Nigel Hulett / Granadilla Films (Zimbabwe), Transition Durham, DRIK (Bangladesh) and Virtual Migrants.  Thanks also for the support from Alex Randall and the UK Climate Change and Migration Coalition. Actors appearing in ‘The Level’ by Mazaher R were Jamil Keating, Afreena Islam and Toby White.

Copyright 2016, Metaceptive / Kooj Chuhan.  All rights reserved.  Full details of the ‘Footprint Modulation’ exhibition at www.metaceptive.net/footprint-modulation .

Art, Climate, Migration: documentary film screenings of Footprint Modulation

INTERESTED TO SCREEN THIS FILM?  Please contact us via http://metaceptive.net/contact .  If you are a funded group or organisation, we would appreciate a voluntary fee or donation.  We intend to expand this exhibition and show it in other cities, please get in touch if you might be interested to host it or to have it shown in your area.

Kooj Chuhan 'CHAMADA FROM CHICO MENDES' 003_imgcredit-Kiran-Mistry_s

The post, Footprint Modulation art exhibition – climate justice and human migration | Kooj Chuhan, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

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The simple act of giving is stronger than a thousand bullets : Milan Rai’s White Butterflies

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To mark the Nepalese Earthquake’s anniversary, Shira Pinson and Lucas Veuve made a series of videos to commemorate the strength and unity that many Nepalese have shown following the tragedy.

They met Milan Rai, an incredible visual artist who is known worldwide for his white butterflies. To commemorate the Earthquake’s anniversary, Milan has created a huge installation with 9,000 white butterflies spread around the grounds of Kalmochan Temple, a place reduced to rubble by the earthquake – each butterfly represents a life lost in the earthquake, symbolizing peace and hope.

photo credit to Prem Tshering Sherpa

photo credit to Prem Tshering Sherpa

It was an emotional day for everyone involved. Many young volunteers came to help Milan to spread the 9,000 butterflies around the temple area. Some people travelled 600km to be part of the poignant event. Remarkably though, the atmosphere was joyful and positive.  They commemorated the lives lost but celebrated life and hope, illustrating, once more the resilience and strength of the Nepalese people.

photo credit to Prem Tshering Sherpa

photo credit to Prem Tshering Sherpa

Lucas Veuve is a documentary filmmaker and photographer based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. He has worked for many international organizations such as GIZ, Handicap International and Care International. He frequently travels to Nepal for personal projects and for commission work. In this project, he has created with Shira Pinson a series of videos for the one-year anniversary of the earthquake.
Twitter:@lucasveuve | Instagram: @lucasveuve | Website: lucasveuve.com

Shira Pinson is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and a video journalist. She has done work for Aljazeera, France 4, BBC Arabic and Vice as well as independent work. In this project, she has joined forces with Lucas Veuve to create a series of videos for the one-year anniversary of the earthquake. This was her first trip to Nepal but not the last.
Twitter: @shirapinson | Instagram: @shirapinson | Website: shirapinson.com

The post, The simple act of giving is stronger than a thousand bullets : Milan Rai’s White Butterflies, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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A Magical Cardboard for Forrest by French Artist Eva Jospin

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Sculptor Eva Jospin constantly reinvents the idea of what a forest is over and over again. She cuts, layers, arranges, glues and builds cardboard into different interpretations of The Woods. Her pieces range from smaller 2D pictures compiled from dense sticks, branches and flaky bits of wood, to life size 3D installations that you are invited into, and can move around within. For Jospin, cardboard is just the medium for a larger message; these trees express many things:

The forest – an incarnation of nature in the wild – is above all the setting in traditional storytelling of tests of courage, and can be a gloomy or initiatory place. The forest is also where one encounters oneself. This walk through the forest initiates the visit to ‘ Inside’, which is also an inner journey. (Interview with Eva Jospin Palais de Tokyo)

Jospin uses a material that is not only durable, robust, strong, and supportive, but also fragile, impermanent, raw and insubstantial. She plays on these two points of view – they mirror the actual qualities of trees, nature and our relationship to it. These poetic attachments to Josie’s Forest pieces isn’t lost on her critics either:

To look at a forest is an optical experience that challenges the typical laws of perspective in western representation. Facing visually the depth of a forest means to forget the horizon, it means to get lost. And is not the danger of getting lost the only risk tied up to that natural labyrinth that is a forest? (Interview Eva Jospi at Galerie Piece Unique)

The post, A Magical Cardboard for Forrest by French Artist Eva Jospin, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Street Artists and Muralists to Paint All 314 Threatened North American Birds

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The National Audubon Society estimates that there are more than 800 birds in North America, though it has only collected and analyzed data on just over 590 of these animals. Of these catalogued avian species, 314 birds are classified as threatened; much of this threat is attributable to human-caused climate change. These numbers are behind the National Audubon Society’s collaboration with gallerist Avi Gitler for the Audubon Mural Project, which encourages street artists and muralists to create works that feature the climate-threatened birds.

As Audubon Society Vice President of Content Mark Jannot tells GOOD, the mural project grew out of theAudubon Birds and Climate Change Report, published in 2014, which detailed how climate change is impacting North American birds. It has grown from a few dozen murals to hundreds, painted on security gates and building exteriors around Manhattan, with a vast array of street artists and muralists enlisted from New York City and beyond.

Jonnot and Gitler came to work together on the Audubon Mural Project when the two were introduced by Jonnot’s neighbor, artist Tom Sanford. Gitler told Sanford he had decided to ask artists to paint about 10 roll-down security gates in his Harlem neighborhood. He already knew that John James Audubon, the famed ornithologist and naturalist, had spent the last years of his life in this very same uptown area, so Sanford suggested Gitler talk to Jonnot about a possible collaboration with the National Audubon Society.

Sanford also suggested that Gitler ask street artists and muralists to paint only climate-threatened birds. But it was Jannot who upped the ante by hitting on the idea of painting all 314 threatened birds. Jannot admits the monumental task was undertaken with “gleeful abandon,” but that they were determined to find a way to run it as a cost-neutral enterprise.

Ultimately, there won’t be 314 murals, Jonnot explains. Instead, the team is committed to 254 murals that will include all 314 species of threatened birds. Currently, there are approximately 24 murals representing about 36 birds. As for the variety of street artists and muralists, Jonnot said they range between various locales and styles.

Because we’ve been able to find recesses in sides of buildings where we can mount paintings that have been painted in studios, we’ve been able to work with studio artists who aren’t as comfortable painting in real-time on the street, as well as street artists and major wall-mural painters,” Jonnot explains. “It’s a pretty big range. We’ve had a lot of interest from artists all over the country when they heard about it. We tell them we can’t fly them in but to let us know when they’re coming through town.”

 

The post, Street Artists and Muralists to Paint All 314 Threatened North American Birds, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Let the River Flow: Looking for the Kifissos

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A couple of months before the Climate Summit in Paris, Cop21, MELD decided to add its grain of salt and produce an experimental action for Athens and its central river, the Kifissos. Athens is one of the least green cities in Europe and the Kifissos was covered by a highway at the dawn of the Olympic Games.

When I arrived in Athens, people kept mentioning the “potami” (the river) as a geographical locator, but the river was nowhere to be seen and when asked, Athenians were vague and uninformed about its existence.  For the past five years, MELD has been developing a multimedia art work with German artist, Alexander Schellow, 50 Greek experts in the fields of architecture, green chemistry, anthropology among others as well as people living by the river.  The piece has been shown in different formats in various countries in the world, but we never had the opportunity to show any of the work in Athens.

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For Let the River Flow, we wanted to create a project that would connect the river to the Athenian civic society: inviting the citizens to meet us at the mouth of the river and form a “human” river linking the different districts of this area.  A small gesture to inspire Athens to connect and reclaim its river.  The act of uniting citizens from all walks of life around a river they have never seen (a large majority) and linking them with each other and the river as a catalyst could only bring awareness, but as well emotional links to the participants.

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We have produced several actions in Athens inviting the citizens to participate and in each and every one of them, had a very successful turnout and feedback, both from city officials, and people on the ground.  As usual, we proceeded by calling upon our community and volunteers in Athens.  Though the response was not great, we managed to compile a team of six photographers and filmmakers, as well as 6 volunteers to help us coordinate the making-of the river.  The Municipality of Athens came on board and was going to disseminate the information through their press contacts: business as usual.

SONY DSC

On Saturday morning, the day of the event, in route to the Southern suburbs, where the river plunges in the Sardonic Gulf, I was bombarded by a series of messages from our volunteers saying they were unable to attend.  To make a long story short, we ended up with 2 volunteers, a couple of photographers and around twenty participants. The river was suddenly becoming a smaller stream than planned.  In the midst of the deception of seeing so little engagement and commitment from the civic society to its environment, we had to transform the action and adapt to this peculiar situation.  We were lucky as the participants, mainly women, had a great level of social responsibility and commitment.  Passion and kindness was floating in the air.  Enthusiasm became our fuel.

Our stream started its procession towards the river’s mouth, from the Old Faliro subway station.  We entered the coastal no-man’s land.  In fact, this entire area is an everlasting landfill. TheSaronikos Gulf has been the center ofEutrophication because of the untreated sewage pollution discharged from the metropolitan Athens and Piraeus areas and the shipping pollution of the port. Before, the effect of sewage effluent (calculated at 600-750,000 m3 per day) on the benthos of the Saronikos was catastrophic from pollutants, such as hydrocarbons, sediments, heavy metals and PAHs.

Numerous abandoned Olympic facilities populate the area. In the background, separated by the motorway, the old invisible coastline used to be the residence of the golden age of Athens *1920-30s, where Athenians had their secondary homes and glamourous hotels.

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Today we can still find traces of these secondary homes, abandoned or squatted by the homeless.  What was one of the most desirable areas of Athens has become a no-man’s land and a depository for garbage.  An area that is better forgotten.  How can that be?  As we make our way among the recycled Olympic buildings, we reach the mouth of the Kifissos.  Here the river stands facing the Aegean, gorged with water.  We decide to take a short brake to honor the river and understand why it is in such a state.  Access is more than difficult: nobody really knows where it is and there are no signs.  Additionally, there is no pathway to the river.  You have to find it and walk through a hostile landscape, among which plastic bottles and all kind of garbage.  We don’t have access to the river, but GARBAGE does. How ironic!  The sun is shining, it’s a beautiful day, we encounter very few people on our path, aside from some fishermen waiting patiently for the catch of the day.  I certainly would not dare try any fish from this area, between the river’s polluted bank and the seaside where there is very little chance to seize a “healthy” fish.

A few meters away from the mouth, we discover another river, the Illisos, that has been high-jacked for other purposes.  The Illisos has also been covered by roads, legal and illegal settlements and now has been rerouted to facilitate water to a couple of new developments on standby on that very coastline.  Developments located in different urban zones, which often lead to political discussions ending up in using the rivers as such, but leaving them in a total state of abandonment, both in reality and in the collective memory of the Athenians. Whether it is The Niarchos Park, or the Hellinikon project, we are sold on sustainable mega projects, which mostly emphasize the commercialization and privatization of the land. A land that has ceased to belong to the citizens of Athens for a long time and is the pray of local and international developers. This disconnect between the natural environment, the city and it citizens is fueled by political and economic decisions and accepted by the large majority of citizens, including the European commission, which is keener to collect “debt money” than enforce European and Greek environmental laws.

The Niarchos project in Kalithea is commendable for bringing to Athens another lung to the city, as well as a new cultural program, but ignoring the living rivers by its side in the name of politics and economics is not an acceptable proposal in the effort of sustainability.  It is more than time for Athenians to look back at their ancient history and not only at their cultural heritage, but at the inherent connections that exist between the citizens, the gods and Nature.

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The post, Let the River Flow: Looking for the Kifissos, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

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Mysteries In Ice | Thompson Library Gallery | ArtCop21

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Mysteries in Ice is a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center Archival Program. The
historic collections of the Polar Archives are featured alongside contemporary pieces that represent current exploration in ice-covered regions.

This exhibit addresses elements of daily life in harsh environments, including lodging and food, as well as the communication of scientific concepts in media and pop culture. Documents, artifacts, and imagery highlight The Ohio State University’s contribution to our understanding of Earth’s changing climate.

Curated by Jason Cervenec, Laura Kissel and Lynn Lay.

Special thanks to the Lincoln Ellsworth Foundation, the Kane Lodge Foundation and the Friends of the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center for their generous financial support.

The post, Mysteries In Ice | Thompson Library Gallery | ArtCop21, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Till It’s Gone | Istanbul Museum of Modern Art

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Featuring artists from various periods and geographies, TILL IT’S GONE explores artistic positions and approaches to the ecological issues and to the world we live in.

Arjen de Leeuw, Act, 2012, HD Video, 2’55’’ © Arjen de Leeuw, Courtesy of the Artist.

Istanbul Modern welcomes 2016 with an exhibition praising nature and focusing on environmental awareness. The exhibition reflects artists’ relationship with nature and interpretations of the concept of sustainability. Featuring artists from various periods and geographies, TILL IT’S GONE explores artistic positions and approaches to the ecological issues and to the world we live in.

Markus Hoffmann, Level Up, 2013. HD Video, 7’50’’, Dead Sea, Israel. © Markus Hoffmann, Courtesy of the Artist.

Su Rynard, Bear, 2004 – 2006, Video SD, 9’30’’ © Susan C Rynard, Courtesy of the Artist.

Scheduled to open on January 13, the exhibition’s preliminary program features Yoko Ono’s large-scale installation “Ex It”, described as “life as a continuation” by the artist.

Curators: Çelenk Bafra, Paolo Colombo

Istanbul Museum of Modern Art logo

The post, Till It’s Gone | Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Liu Bolin Reminds Us Of The Destruction Brought By Coal And Deforestation

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“I put my thinking of the whole of society and my view of the entire world into my artworks,”

Liu Bolin produces sculptures, installations, paintings, and photographs in which he critiques global societies. Though he has traveled to cities like New York and Paris for his work, he focuses principally on his native China, characterized by rampant development and consumerism. Among his best-known projects is his “Hiding in the City” series (begun 2005). Eschewing Photoshop, Liu stands in front of iconic cultural, historical, and commercial sites, camouflages himself to blend (almost) seamlessly into his surroundings, and photographs himself. The resulting images show him dissolved into shelves of junk food or the Great Wall—a Taoist vision of oneness with the world, and a warning of contemporary society’s consumptive power.

A consequence of China’s rapid economic development through industrialisation, urbanisation, and excessive consumption, is the severe deterioration of ecology and the highly polluted urban living environment. Mountains have been deforested, if not split or leveled for urban constructions; rivers have been dried if not contaminated by industrial wastes; and landscapes have been transformed beyond recognition. In particular, for urban dwellers, outdoor air pollution has recently been identified as the fourth-leading factor for premature death in China . To compensate for the destruction of nature, urban planners started designing green zones and parks amid concrete jungles made up of urban high-rises to bring a small piece of nature back to human living. Hiding in the City No. 94 – In the Woods speaks to the belated human awareness of the importance of trees, nature, and clean air, in which Liu Bolin “disappears” into a small forest in an urban park.

In 2010 Liu Bolin created the optical illusion of thousands of people who disappear (die) every year because of China’s massive coal consumption. Devoid of regulation, China’s coal mines experience regular explosions, cave-ins, and other fatal disasters. “Coal Pile is a conceptual commentary on the consequences of not only the dependence on coal, a limited resource, but the dangers that come for families who work with and use coal, ironically, to survive,” explains the artist.

The post, Liu Bolin Reminds Us Of The Destruction Brought By Coal And Deforestation, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Journey Of The Private Moon | Leonid Tishkov | #ArtCop21

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SENECA ANTICAFE, ROMANIA

The Journey of the Private Moon exhibition encapsulates this trip by presenting the photographs made by Leonid Tishkov, maps of the areas affected by industrial activities, videos by the local environmental non-governmental organizations and…The Moon itself.

Rosia Montana

Around late August of 2015 the people of Romania were to observe a rather unusual event: a 2000 kilometer long moonlight path across the country. It was the Moon acting like a marker, drawing a line on the land’s map and our attention to it:

Rovinari

Piatra Craiului National Park – virgin beech forests and areas of complete deforestation;
Trovanții or the growing stones and the depleted deposits of Rosia Montana;
The Santamaria-Orlea stone church full of light, and the small church from Geamana, the erased village, immersed in the toxic, man-made lake for copper deposit and toxic waste;

Living Stones

The walls of the formaldehyde factory from Sebes and the fence of one’s home behind CET Rovinari.
This extraordinary travel was recorded by Leonid Tishkov in twelve photographs and through notes from witnesses, pins on the ecological map and recordings of it.
The Journey of the Private Moon exhibition encapsulates this trip by presenting the photographs made by Leonid Tishkov, maps of the areas affected by industrial activities, videos by the local environmental non-governmental organizations and…The Moon itself.

Podul Dambovitei The Moon and plastic bottle

The post, Journey Of The Private Moon | Leonid Tishkov | ArtCop21, appeared first on MELD.
———-

meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Eden | Olga Kisseleva | #ArtCop21 | Art Museum Beijing Art Academy China

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The artiste Olga Kisseleva works of bringing extinct species back to life, or of creating new species on the preexisting base of DNA. A truly artistic utopia, assuming that extinction, can be revoked thanks to the advancement of contemporary human civilisation.


Nowadays, a lot of extinct vegetable and animal species can be classified as being “physically extinct, but not genetically”. These species have disappeared as a result of global warming and its immediate consequences on their natural habitat and their living conditions. Their DNA has nevertheless been safeguarded and preserved in laboratories or museums, and can therefore be reactivated by scientists. Thanks to the advancement made through research in the domain of genetic technology, DNA can be used as a base in the rebirth of the species to which it belongs, the exception being with the dna of animals who lived a very long time ago. That of dinosaurs being a good example; they are classified as being “physically and genetically extinct”.

One of the directions explored by bio-art and the artist Olga Kisseleva is the possibility of bringing extinct species back to life, or of creating new species on the preexisting base of DNA. A truly artistic utopia, assuming that extinction, despite its supposedly definitive and irreversible characteristic, can be revoked thanks to the advancement of contemporary human civilisation. the realization of this utopia therefore allows for the preservation of biological diversity, the reestablishment of weakened ecosystems and the deletion imagined by the damage caused to nature by man.

25 NOV – 27 DEC 2015, 9:30am – 4:30pm

ART MUSEUM OF BEIJING FINE ART ACADEMY, CHINA

The post, Eden | Olga Kisseleva | ArtCop21 | Art Museum Beijing Art Academy China, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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