ecoartscotland

The rising waters – call for contributions to the Dark Mountain Project

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Do you think about the rising waters?  Do you write about them?  Do they become images in your work?  Do overflowing rivers and flooded fields haunt you.  They haunt Paul Kingsnorth.

Dark Mountain issue five is currently at the printers, and will be hitting the streets (or our online shop, anyway) in early April. In the meantime, we are putting out a call for writing and art for book 6, which will be published this coming October.

The loose theme this time around is ‘The Rising of the Waters.’ We’re looking for writing and art which seriously engages with the likelihood of a gradual, messy winding-down of everything we take for granted. You can read more about what we’re looking for in this blog entry.

As ever, we welcome submissions from writers and artists both new and established. Please read our submissions guidelines before sending us anything. The deadline for submissions in Sunday 4th May. We look forward to seeing what floats in on the tides.

And the full blog post here

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

dot.rural internships

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

dot.rural Internship Scheme 2014

dot.rural is one of the three RCUK Digital Economy research hubs and brings together a team of over 80 researchers from a range of academic disciplines to explore the challenges of the rural digital economy. Activities in the Hub are organised around four rural challenges: healthcare, accessibility & mobilities, conservation of natural resources, enterprise & culture. Technology research to meet challenges in these areas is focused around natural language generation and affective communication, mechanisms to support reasoning, coordination and collaboration, intelligent information infrastructures, satellite and wireless communications. More details on the Hub its research activities and projects can be found on the website: http://www.dotrural.ac.uk

Internship Scheme

As part of its wider engagement with the academic community and impact agenda, dot.rural has introduced a summer internship scheme. This is designed to support students from outside dot.rural and the University of Aberdeen to spend time at the Hub. You will join a lively community of 23 PhD students already based in the Hub, working across a range of disciplines.

The duration of an internship is 10 weeks (full-time) and the scheme is aimed at currently registered postgraduate students, particularly PhD students. For PhD students who receive a stipend from their home university during the internship, a bursary of £300 per week will be available. For PhD students who suspend their stipend at their home university’s request, an enhanced bursary of £350 per week will be available. Internships will take place over Summer 2014.

University accommodation is available (at a cost to the intern) but is only available between 23 June and 30 August 2014.

Applications should be submitted by 5pm on 25 April 2014 by filling in the application form and uploading a CV. Applications will be considered by the Hub Directors and relevant other researchers in dot.rural. For queries relating to the scheme contact Dr Jennifer Holden (j.a.holden@abdn.ac.uk, 01224 274238).

Eligibility

Internships are only available to UK or EEA students, i.e. UK nationals at a UK university, EEA nationals at a UK university and EEA nationals at a EEA university. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the scheme and UKBA regulations, students on a Tier 4 visa at UK universities are not eligible to apply for internships.

Due to the nature of the funding for the internship scheme, students registered at the University of Aberdeen are not eligible.

Illustrative Topics

For the 2014 internships we are looking for interns to specify their own 10 week research project related to dot.rural’s current work or future priorities related to the Information Economy. Projects do not need to be rural in their focus and research areas could include (but are not limited to):

  • Social Media – Data Analytics (inc. Text-Mining), Curation
  • Internet of Things
  • Trust, Privacy & Risk
  • Digital Culture
  • Smart Cities
  • Climate Change, Risk & Vulnerability
  • Personal & Pervasive Health
  • Inclusive & Secure Societies

For more background information on the UK Government’s Information Economy strategy, see the report at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/information-economy-strategy

Timetable

  • Deadline for Applications 25 April 2014
  • Decisions Announced 16 May 2014
  • Earliest Internship Start Date 23 June 2014

University Accommodation Available: 23 June to 30 August 2014 (Wavell House £17pppn) 14 July – 30 August (New Carnegie Court en suite £22.50 pppn) contact: hillhead.halls@abdn.ac.uk

Residential Requirement

It is expected that internship students will be physically present in the Hub everyday during the working week, except when they are away on fieldwork and other meetings away from the Hub. Part of the internship is about spending time in a large interdisciplinary Hub and making the most of the networking opportunities and mentoring opportunities from postdoctoral researchers. Short-term accommodation is can be difficult to find in Aberdeen so it is highly recommended that internship students time their internship period with when university vacation accommodation is available.

Selection Criteria

Each application will be considered on its merits, with the following criteria being used to guide the selection process: academic excellence, fit between student and internship topic, potential for impact, and feedback from referees.

To Apply

To apply for a dot.rural internship please complete the online application form at http://www.dotrural.ac.uk/content/applicationinternship. As part of the application process you will be required to upload a 2 page CV (as pdf) and to supply the names for two referees. For PhD students one of these referees should be your lead supervisor. You will also be required to outline a possible internship project including possible academics and researchers you would work with.

Call
Send SMS
Add to Skype
You’ll need Skype CreditFree via Skype

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Eradicating Ecocide in Ireland – send letter to Phil Hogan now

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

chrisfremantle:

Really interesting piece on the legal arguments – EcoArtScotland has posted previously on the legal process of giving legal identity to rivers, and this is another dimension of the argument

Originally posted on resiliencies: stories from a small Irish forest:

meandPollyH

Me [Cathy Fitzgerald] with Polly Higgins, environmental lawyer and campaigner for making Ecocide the missing 5th international crime against peace. Polly’s talk was organised by Friends of the Earth and the Law Dept of Queen’s University, Belfast, 11 Feb 2014.

Ecocide, Earth rights and restorative justice: the three cornerstones of a growing international movement to establish new laws which protect both people and planet. The Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth10 was proposed by Polly Higgins in 2008 (as a Universal Declaration of the Planetary Rights).
‘The Ecocide Project: ‘Ecocide is the missing 5th Crime against Peace’ (2012)

A week ago I was in Belfast to hear environmental lawyer speak Polly Higgins speak about the urgent need for a law to make ecocide an internationally recognised crime. After Polly’s talk I was thrilled to meet with her – as some of you know I worked this time last year to present a motion at the Green Party of Ireland and Northern Ireland to support Polly’s growing international campaign to have Ecocide recognised as the missing 5th Crime Against Peace – it was unanimously supported. Polly had heard someone in Ireland had brought this into Ireland’s public arena via the Green Party and was thrilled to put a face to a name (she gave me an enormous hug and a friend snapped this picture straight after -thanks Jan!).

View original to read more.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Presenting at Enhancing Lives Through Arts & Health, Houston, TX

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Originally posted on CHRIS FREMANTLE:

Chris Fremantle’s proposal for a paper “Scottish artists bring nature into healthcare” has been accepted for the Global Alliance for Arts & Health 25th Conference in Houston, Texas in April.The abstract is,

Scotland has a strong portfolio of arts and health projects including both public art installations within healthcare buildings and participatory programmes, in particular with people with long term conditions. This presentation will focus on public art installations by artists and designers which use biophilic and other design approaches to bringing nature into buildings. It addresses the conference themes of Patient Care, Healing Environments and Caring for Caregivers.

It is well known thanks to the work of Robert Ulrich that views of nature contribute to patient recover, and it is clear from the work of Stephen Kaplan that views of nature can play a role in restoring our ability to give our attention. OPENspace Research at Edinburgh College of Art (http://openspace.eca.ac.uk/ ) has further substantiated the connections between nature and wellbeing focusing on inclusive access to the outdoors.

In Scotland there have been a number of projects in the context of Healthcare where artists and designers have specifically sought to use art and design to bring nature into buildings in addition to what the architects and landscape designers are able to achieve.

Four key examples are:

Thomas A Clark’s (http://thomasaclarkblog.blogspot.co.uk/) project with the architects Reiach & Hall, ‘A Grove of Larch in a Forest of Birch,’ for the New Stobhill Hospital in Glasgow integrated poetry and visual arts into what the architects described as the architecture of waiting. The Aim was to create spaces in which users of the hospital could wait for appointments in “a place apart having the brightness and stillness of a woodland glade.”

Alexander Hamilton’s (http://www.alexanderhamilton.co.uk/) Designing for Dignity (http://designingfordignity.co.uk/Inspired-by-Nature) is an approach that draws on a deep understanding of the Victorian poet and artist John Ruskin and of the more recent Biophilia Hypothesis. Hamilton is currently developing designs including furniture and art for the Quiet or Family rooms in the New South Glasgow Hospitals based on an extensive programme of creative engagement. Hamilton is also working on the design of a healthcentre in Glasgow.

Dalziel + Scullion’s (http://www.dalzielscullion.com/) practice is increasingly focused on addressing nature deficit disorder. Their work encompasses exhibitions and public art. Their scheme for the wards of the New South Glasgow Hospitals will bring the whole landscape of Scotland into one building. Their project Rosnes Benches, currently being installed in the landscape of Dumfries and Galloway, they have also contributed work to the Vale of Leven Health Centre (http://www.wide-open.net/index.php?page=vale-of-leven)

Donald Urquhart has completed public art projects for four mental health hospitals including most recently Midpark Acute Mental Health Hospital (http://www.wide-open.net/index.php?page=healing-spaces) and developed Sanctuary spaces for both hospitals and universities. His award winning design for the Sanctuary at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary has become a benchmark (http://www.ginkgoprojects.co.uk/projects/royal-infirmary-edinburgh).

These artists and others demonstrate key aspects of the role of art in bringing nature into healthcare contexts including focus on characteristics of nature such as colour, pattern and movement. As artists they use attention, framing and synthesis.

In addition to sharing these developments with the conference audience I hope to identify other artists exploring similar issues.

He is  very much hoping to find other artists and designers working along these lines with the depth of thinking as well as the quality of work.

View original

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

WRITING ROOT & CLAW: A WEEKEND WORKSHOP

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Originally posted on Em Strang :

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

WRITING ROOT & CLAW

A Weekend Workshop with Susan Richardson & Em Strang

October 17-19 2014, Haybergill Centre, Cumbria

Come along to a stimulating weekend of writing and discussion around ecological themes. What does it mean to write nature poetry in the 21st century? How do we express wildness? Is it possible to speak for nonhuman species? There’ll be an emphasis on writing and exploring poetry, but prose writers are also very welcome.

You’ll have the opportunity to share your work, engage in writing exercises both indoors and out in the inspirational landscape surrounding Haybergill Centre (http://www.haybergill.co.uk/), enjoy delicious food, autumn walks, evening bonfires and even a sauna! There’ll be space timetabled into the weekend for plenty of focused periods of writing, plus helpful feedback and editing sessions in a supportive group setting. All levels of experience welcome.

Susan is a Wales-based poet whose most recent collection, Where the Air is Rarefied (Cinnamon Press) is a collaboration with printmaker Pat Gregory on ecological and mythological themes relating to the Far North. Her third collection, Skindancing, will be published in 2015. Susan has more than sixteen years’ experience of running poetry workshops for universities, conservation organisations and environmental groups, both indoors and outside in wilder landscapes. For further information, please visit: www.susanrichardsonwriter.co.uk

Em completed a PhD in Creative Writing (ecological poetry) in December 2013 and is now seeking a publisher for a first collection of poems, Habitude. She has recently been awarded a New Writer Scotland Award 2014 and teaches Creative Writing in Dumfries prison. She is currently also tutoring on the Mlitt in Environment, Culture & Communication at the University of Glasgow (Dumfries). For further information, please visit: http://emstrang.wordpress.com/

Cost for the weekend includes 2 nights’ full-board: £335. Accommodation is in twin or single rooms (single room supplement applies and these rooms will be allocated on a first come, first served basis). All meals are vegetarian and special diets can be catered for. For bookings and further details contact: emmastrang@hotmail.com or susan@susanrichardsonwriter.co.uk

View original 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

From the Valley of the Deer on Turbulence

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Jillian Mcdonald‘s augmented reality work From the Valley of the Deer, resulting from a residency at Glenfiddich, is now accessible on the Turbulence website.

The press release is as follows,

“From the Valley of the Deer” is an augmented reality artwork based on Valley of the Deer, a video installation produced in Scotland in 2013. In each city where the installation is exhibited, local GPS coordinates will be haunted by characters and scenes from the video, discoverable on walking tours near the exhibition site. These apparitions may also be stumbled upon as ‘Points of Interest’ by passersby, the locations visited long after by spirits of a distant valley.

“From the Valley of the Deer” is a 2013 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence website. It was funded by the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Jillian McDonald is a Canadian artist who divides her time between New York and Canada. She is an Associate Professor of Art at Pace University. She is hopelessly in love with northern places, snow, fog, and the ocean, and since 2006 has watched a healthy amount of horror films. She spent much of the past year living and working in Northeastern Scotland.

Solo shows and projects include the Esker Foundation in Calgary; Moti Hasson Gallery, Jack the Pelican Presents, and vertexList in New York; The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and Rosenthal Gallery in San Francisco; Hallwalls in Buffalo; La Sala Narañja in Valencia, Spain; and YYZ in Toronto. Her work has been included in group exhibitions and festivals at The Chelsea Museum and The Whitney Museum’s Artport in New York; The Edith Russ Haus for Media Art in Oldenburg, Germany; MMOCA in Madison, Wisconsin; Onsite at OCADU and YYZ Gallery in Toronto; The International Biennial of Contemporary Art in Mérida, Venezuela; The Sundance Film Festival in Utah; La Biennale de Montréal; and the Centre d’Art Contemporain de Basse-Normandie in Caen, France.

Her work was the subject of a 2013 radio documentary by Paul Kennedy on CBC’s IDEAS. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, Art Papers, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, Border Crossings, and The Village Voice, among others. A discussion of her work appears in several books including Better Off Dead, edited by Sarah Juliet Lauro and Stalking by Bran Nicol.

McDonald has received grants and commissions from The New York Foundation for the Arts, The Canada Council for the Arts, Soil New Media, Turbulence.org, The Verizon Foundation, The New York State Council on the Arts, The Experimental Television Center, and Pace University. She lectures regularly about her work and has attended numerous residencies including The Headlands Center for the Arts in California, Lilith Performance Studio in Sweden, The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Program in New York, The Western Front in Vancouver, and The Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta. In 2012 she represented Canada at the Glenfiddich international residency in Dufftown, Scotland.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The project provides a unique opportunity with much of the land within Hadleigh Country Park being designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest as it is a haven for around 1,300 species of wildlife including the shrill carder bee, the emerald damselfly and the weevil hunting wasp. The local environment also supports dark-bellied Brent geese.

Public Art Online Commissions – Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity.

(Deadline was 3 March 2014)

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Could an artist do this?

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Recycling of Gully Waste and General Road Construction Materials in South Lanarkshire

The Council requires to procure services for the acceptance and subsequent recycling of gully waste and road construction materials produced from the works of South Lanarkshire Council’s Roads and Transportation Services.

Roads and Transportation Services operates four Depots as follows:-

  • Carnwath Depot – ML11 8LR
  • Lesmahagow – ML11 0DZ
  • East Kilbride – G74 5HA
  • Larkhall – ML9 2GA

The waste materials for /recycling will be transported by South Lanarkshire Council to the Contractor’s facility. Where required, the Contractor will also provide an uplift service, transporting waste road construction materials from Council Depots to its recycling facility.

The waste is composed as follows:-

Category A:- Materials including vegetation, timber, plastic and other processed or manufactured materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Category B:- Materials including rock, crushed rock, blaes, concrete, metal, soil, subsoil, and other excavated materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Gully waste:- Waste Category 20 03 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Motor and lorry tyres: Waste Category 16 01 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Bitumen emulsion:- Bitumen emulsion tack coat. Waste Category 08 04 16 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

CPV: 90500000, 90514000.

View Notice – Public Contracts Scotland.

EcoArtScotland wonders about this, not particularly because of the land art tradition, but more from an ecological art perspective.  We’d cite Betty Beaumont’s Ocean Landmark which involved using 500 tons of coal waste processed into 17,000 coal fly ash blocks and then deposited into the ocean to create a new marine environment off Fire Island in the North East United States.

EcoArtScotland suspects that there are innovative ways to dispose of this material and enhance biodiversity or storm water management or something we can’t even imagine.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Greenteas(e) big event 8 April

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

EcoArtScotland has been attending Creative Carbon Scotland‘s Greentea(se) events in Glasgow and they are a very provocative process of trying to think through how culture and sustainability might collectively be able to change Glasgow, and what it would look like in 20 years.  The Greenteas(e) events are always open with a changing group of participants.  This larger event at Govanhill Baths is an opportunity for you to join the discussion.  You can sign up through Eventbrite.  Contact Creative Carbon Scotland through their website or on Facebook, Linkedin or Twitter.

Join Creative Carbon Scotland for Green Teas(e) – a day-long gathering of folk interested in arts and sustainability imagining how they can grow a more sustainable Glasgow!

Green Teas(e) brings together the artistic and sustainability worlds of Glasgow to spark new connections and join up projects and activities which share a common desire to make the city a more environmentally, socially and economically sustainable place to live.

This free event is open to anyone who’s interested in making Glasgow a greener city and exploring the roles which the arts could play in achieving this. Whether you’ve attended previous discussions or you’re brand new to Green Teas(e) Creative Carbon Scotland will be delighted if you could to join them at Govanhill Baths on 8th April.

Over the course of the day the group will look at what characteristics could make a more sustainable Glasgow and what role artists and arts organisations can play in growing and promoting these. Most importantly, the group will explore how to actually make these things happen.

Schedule for the day:

9-9.30 Tea, Coffee and arrivals

9.30 Introduction – Creative Carbon Scotland

9.45 Green Teas(e) – Penny Anderson, Writer and Artist, Aims and progress to date

10.30 Coffee and opportunity to see/hear about related artworks/projects currently happening or in the pipeline

11.00 Sustaining Creativity – Sholeh Johnston (Julie’s Bicycle), will talk about the findings from their UK-wide survey ‘Sustaining Creativity’ which asked CEO’s and artistic directors about their vision for a more sustainable cultural sector around key themes such as circularity, value and digital tools.

12.00 Introduction to the afternoon – Creative Carbon Scotland, A few thoughts to bring together the ideas from the morning and pose some questions for further discussion.

12.30 Lunch and the opportunity to see/hear about related artworks/projects being carried out by others

1.30 – 4.15 Imagining 20 projects which move the group forward to a Greener Glasgow

In the afternoon Creative Carbon Scotland will come up with 20 projects that will help develop a more sustainable arts sector in Glasgow and/or a more sustainable Glasgow – socially, culturally, environmentally. Facilitators from a range of disciplines/artforms/fields are invited to lead sessions to disuss and expand upon a range of ideas and proposals for projects that would help us begin to build this more sustainable Glasgow. The aim of this is not to plan an actual project with funding, people, locations, organisations etc. but to come up with ideas that would be interesting, stimulating and challenging and which could motivate us onto action.

4.15 Tea/coffee

4.30 Plenary

5.30 Drinks – open to all!

7.00 Finish

Creative Carbon Scotland is looking for you to send us ideas and proposals for the afternoon session. They want exciting ideas that will lead them on to the next, pro-active, stage. Please send ideas to Katie Stuart: katieshearerstuart@gmail.com. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Residency Opp and Green Teas(e) Reflections – Creative Carbon Scotland

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Our friends and colleagues at Creative Carbon Scotland have a call out for artists to participate in a residency,

Mull is a multi-disciplinary weekend-long residency which explores the question, ‘What would it mean to be an artist working in a sustainable Scotland in 50 years’ time?’ through artistic practice and conversation. We’re looking for up to ten artists to apply their curiosity and unique skills to imagining what being an artist in a sustainable Scotland might look like in the future – what that would mean, how it would affect artistic content, what infrastructure it would require in order to function and how artists and the arts will have shaped a sustainable Scotland.  More info here.

They have also been running a programme of Green Tea(se) in Glasgow to build up the discussion about what a sustainable city and cultural sector might look like.  They’ve been blogging the outcomes of the events.  Green Teas(e) is part of a wider EU project called the Green Arts Lab Alliance. To find out more, click here.

If you want to contribute to imagining a more sustainable cultural sector, then come along and join the conversation. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico