ecoartscotland

WRITING ROOT & CLAW: A WEEKEND WORKSHOP

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Originally posted on Em Strang :

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WRITING ROOT & CLAW

A Weekend Workshop with Susan Richardson & Em Strang

October 17-19 2014, Haybergill Centre, Cumbria

Come along to a stimulating weekend of writing and discussion around ecological themes. What does it mean to write nature poetry in the 21st century? How do we express wildness? Is it possible to speak for nonhuman species? There’ll be an emphasis on writing and exploring poetry, but prose writers are also very welcome.

You’ll have the opportunity to share your work, engage in writing exercises both indoors and out in the inspirational landscape surrounding Haybergill Centre (http://www.haybergill.co.uk/), enjoy delicious food, autumn walks, evening bonfires and even a sauna! There’ll be space timetabled into the weekend for plenty of focused periods of writing, plus helpful feedback and editing sessions in a supportive group setting. All levels of experience welcome.

Susan is a Wales-based poet whose most recent collection, Where the Air is Rarefied (Cinnamon Press) is a collaboration with printmaker Pat Gregory on ecological and mythological themes relating to the Far North. Her third collection, Skindancing, will be published in 2015. Susan has more than sixteen years’ experience of running poetry workshops for universities, conservation organisations and environmental groups, both indoors and outside in wilder landscapes. For further information, please visit: www.susanrichardsonwriter.co.uk

Em completed a PhD in Creative Writing (ecological poetry) in December 2013 and is now seeking a publisher for a first collection of poems, Habitude. She has recently been awarded a New Writer Scotland Award 2014 and teaches Creative Writing in Dumfries prison. She is currently also tutoring on the Mlitt in Environment, Culture & Communication at the University of Glasgow (Dumfries). For further information, please visit: http://emstrang.wordpress.com/

Cost for the weekend includes 2 nights’ full-board: £335. Accommodation is in twin or single rooms (single room supplement applies and these rooms will be allocated on a first come, first served basis). All meals are vegetarian and special diets can be catered for. For bookings and further details contact: emmastrang@hotmail.com or susan@susanrichardsonwriter.co.uk

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ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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From the Valley of the Deer on Turbulence

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Jillian Mcdonald‘s augmented reality work From the Valley of the Deer, resulting from a residency at Glenfiddich, is now accessible on the Turbulence website.

The press release is as follows,

“From the Valley of the Deer” is an augmented reality artwork based on Valley of the Deer, a video installation produced in Scotland in 2013. In each city where the installation is exhibited, local GPS coordinates will be haunted by characters and scenes from the video, discoverable on walking tours near the exhibition site. These apparitions may also be stumbled upon as ‘Points of Interest’ by passersby, the locations visited long after by spirits of a distant valley.

“From the Valley of the Deer” is a 2013 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence website. It was funded by the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Jillian McDonald is a Canadian artist who divides her time between New York and Canada. She is an Associate Professor of Art at Pace University. She is hopelessly in love with northern places, snow, fog, and the ocean, and since 2006 has watched a healthy amount of horror films. She spent much of the past year living and working in Northeastern Scotland.

Solo shows and projects include the Esker Foundation in Calgary; Moti Hasson Gallery, Jack the Pelican Presents, and vertexList in New York; The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and Rosenthal Gallery in San Francisco; Hallwalls in Buffalo; La Sala Narañja in Valencia, Spain; and YYZ in Toronto. Her work has been included in group exhibitions and festivals at The Chelsea Museum and The Whitney Museum’s Artport in New York; The Edith Russ Haus for Media Art in Oldenburg, Germany; MMOCA in Madison, Wisconsin; Onsite at OCADU and YYZ Gallery in Toronto; The International Biennial of Contemporary Art in Mérida, Venezuela; The Sundance Film Festival in Utah; La Biennale de Montréal; and the Centre d’Art Contemporain de Basse-Normandie in Caen, France.

Her work was the subject of a 2013 radio documentary by Paul Kennedy on CBC’s IDEAS. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, Art Papers, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, Border Crossings, and The Village Voice, among others. A discussion of her work appears in several books including Better Off Dead, edited by Sarah Juliet Lauro and Stalking by Bran Nicol.

McDonald has received grants and commissions from The New York Foundation for the Arts, The Canada Council for the Arts, Soil New Media, Turbulence.org, The Verizon Foundation, The New York State Council on the Arts, The Experimental Television Center, and Pace University. She lectures regularly about her work and has attended numerous residencies including The Headlands Center for the Arts in California, Lilith Performance Studio in Sweden, The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Program in New York, The Western Front in Vancouver, and The Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta. In 2012 she represented Canada at the Glenfiddich international residency in Dufftown, Scotland.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity

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The project provides a unique opportunity with much of the land within Hadleigh Country Park being designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest as it is a haven for around 1,300 species of wildlife including the shrill carder bee, the emerald damselfly and the weevil hunting wasp. The local environment also supports dark-bellied Brent geese.

Public Art Online Commissions – Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity.

(Deadline was 3 March 2014)

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Could an artist do this?

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Recycling of Gully Waste and General Road Construction Materials in South Lanarkshire

The Council requires to procure services for the acceptance and subsequent recycling of gully waste and road construction materials produced from the works of South Lanarkshire Council’s Roads and Transportation Services.

Roads and Transportation Services operates four Depots as follows:-

  • Carnwath Depot – ML11 8LR
  • Lesmahagow – ML11 0DZ
  • East Kilbride – G74 5HA
  • Larkhall – ML9 2GA

The waste materials for /recycling will be transported by South Lanarkshire Council to the Contractor’s facility. Where required, the Contractor will also provide an uplift service, transporting waste road construction materials from Council Depots to its recycling facility.

The waste is composed as follows:-

Category A:- Materials including vegetation, timber, plastic and other processed or manufactured materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Category B:- Materials including rock, crushed rock, blaes, concrete, metal, soil, subsoil, and other excavated materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Gully waste:- Waste Category 20 03 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Motor and lorry tyres: Waste Category 16 01 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Bitumen emulsion:- Bitumen emulsion tack coat. Waste Category 08 04 16 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

CPV: 90500000, 90514000.

View Notice – Public Contracts Scotland.

EcoArtScotland wonders about this, not particularly because of the land art tradition, but more from an ecological art perspective.  We’d cite Betty Beaumont’s Ocean Landmark which involved using 500 tons of coal waste processed into 17,000 coal fly ash blocks and then deposited into the ocean to create a new marine environment off Fire Island in the North East United States.

EcoArtScotland suspects that there are innovative ways to dispose of this material and enhance biodiversity or storm water management or something we can’t even imagine.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Greenteas(e) big event 8 April

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EcoArtScotland has been attending Creative Carbon Scotland‘s Greentea(se) events in Glasgow and they are a very provocative process of trying to think through how culture and sustainability might collectively be able to change Glasgow, and what it would look like in 20 years.  The Greenteas(e) events are always open with a changing group of participants.  This larger event at Govanhill Baths is an opportunity for you to join the discussion.  You can sign up through Eventbrite.  Contact Creative Carbon Scotland through their website or on Facebook, Linkedin or Twitter.

Join Creative Carbon Scotland for Green Teas(e) – a day-long gathering of folk interested in arts and sustainability imagining how they can grow a more sustainable Glasgow!

Green Teas(e) brings together the artistic and sustainability worlds of Glasgow to spark new connections and join up projects and activities which share a common desire to make the city a more environmentally, socially and economically sustainable place to live.

This free event is open to anyone who’s interested in making Glasgow a greener city and exploring the roles which the arts could play in achieving this. Whether you’ve attended previous discussions or you’re brand new to Green Teas(e) Creative Carbon Scotland will be delighted if you could to join them at Govanhill Baths on 8th April.

Over the course of the day the group will look at what characteristics could make a more sustainable Glasgow and what role artists and arts organisations can play in growing and promoting these. Most importantly, the group will explore how to actually make these things happen.

Schedule for the day:

9-9.30 Tea, Coffee and arrivals

9.30 Introduction – Creative Carbon Scotland

9.45 Green Teas(e) – Penny Anderson, Writer and Artist, Aims and progress to date

10.30 Coffee and opportunity to see/hear about related artworks/projects currently happening or in the pipeline

11.00 Sustaining Creativity – Sholeh Johnston (Julie’s Bicycle), will talk about the findings from their UK-wide survey ‘Sustaining Creativity’ which asked CEO’s and artistic directors about their vision for a more sustainable cultural sector around key themes such as circularity, value and digital tools.

12.00 Introduction to the afternoon – Creative Carbon Scotland, A few thoughts to bring together the ideas from the morning and pose some questions for further discussion.

12.30 Lunch and the opportunity to see/hear about related artworks/projects being carried out by others

1.30 – 4.15 Imagining 20 projects which move the group forward to a Greener Glasgow

In the afternoon Creative Carbon Scotland will come up with 20 projects that will help develop a more sustainable arts sector in Glasgow and/or a more sustainable Glasgow – socially, culturally, environmentally. Facilitators from a range of disciplines/artforms/fields are invited to lead sessions to disuss and expand upon a range of ideas and proposals for projects that would help us begin to build this more sustainable Glasgow. The aim of this is not to plan an actual project with funding, people, locations, organisations etc. but to come up with ideas that would be interesting, stimulating and challenging and which could motivate us onto action.

4.15 Tea/coffee

4.30 Plenary

5.30 Drinks – open to all!

7.00 Finish

Creative Carbon Scotland is looking for you to send us ideas and proposals for the afternoon session. They want exciting ideas that will lead them on to the next, pro-active, stage. Please send ideas to Katie Stuart: katieshearerstuart@gmail.com. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Residency Opp and Green Teas(e) Reflections – Creative Carbon Scotland

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Our friends and colleagues at Creative Carbon Scotland have a call out for artists to participate in a residency,

Mull is a multi-disciplinary weekend-long residency which explores the question, ‘What would it mean to be an artist working in a sustainable Scotland in 50 years’ time?’ through artistic practice and conversation. We’re looking for up to ten artists to apply their curiosity and unique skills to imagining what being an artist in a sustainable Scotland might look like in the future – what that would mean, how it would affect artistic content, what infrastructure it would require in order to function and how artists and the arts will have shaped a sustainable Scotland.  More info here.

They have also been running a programme of Green Tea(se) in Glasgow to build up the discussion about what a sustainable city and cultural sector might look like.  They’ve been blogging the outcomes of the events.  Green Teas(e) is part of a wider EU project called the Green Arts Lab Alliance. To find out more, click here.

If you want to contribute to imagining a more sustainable cultural sector, then come along and join the conversation. 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Margaret Tait Residency

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The Margaret Tait Residency is an opportunity for early career artists working with film and moving image to undertake a focused period of work on Orkney.  Deadline 9am 4 April 2014. 

The Margaret Tait Residency aims to support and develop the skills of an emerging Scottish or Scotland-based artist working within film and moving image. It was developed for artists early in their career who would benefit from a focused period of development in a stimulating environment outwith their typical studio base.

The recipient of the Residency will travel to Stromness Orkney in summer 2014 and be based there for eight weeks. They will be given accommodation, studio space, artist support at Pier Arts Centre and living expenses. After the Residency, they will complete a series of mentor sessions with prominent artists, as well as film production courses as requested and required. The artist is expected to then deliver a film or film event by February 2015 for inclusion in Glasgow Film Festival’s programme.

Applications are now sought from the sector. The deadline is 9am, Friday 4 April 2014.

Selection process:

Who can apply?

  • Scottish artists or artists based in Scotland.
  • Emerging artists, early in their career (graduating in the last three to five years in a relevant course), who work in film and moving image.
  • There is no age restriction.
  • We regret that we cannot accept applications from artists who are students.

To apply, please send the following:

Timeline:

  • Eight weeks to be spent in Stromness, Orkney in summer 2014 (dates negotiable between May–September).
  • Further support and training to take place in UK between September–December, based on your needs and aims.
  • Film screening at Glasgow Film Festival, February 2015.
  • Film to tour beyond Glasgow, with assistance from GFF–from March 2015 onwards.

Deadline for nominations: 9am on Friday 4 April 2014.

2012 Margaret Tait Residency winner Sarah Forrest

The inaugural Margaret Tait Residency was supported by the Creative Scotland Creative Futures Programme, LUX and the Pier Arts Centre. The panel selected Sarah Forrest as the recipient of the Residency which took place in summer 2012 at Pier Arts Centre in Stromness Orkney for six weeks. After the Residency, Sarah completed six mentor sessions with prominent artists, as well as camera skills and sound editing courses in London and Glasgow.

Sarah Forrest’s film, that now, screened to a busy Cinema 2 audience on Friday 17 February 2013 at GFT, and was well received. Sarah then took the film back to Orkney in April 2013 for a screening at Stromness Town Hall, alongside Blue Black Permanent by Margaret Tait and has since screened at Belfast, Leeds and Rotterdam.

You can read more about Margaret Tait at LUX online.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Casting Out Sunday 30 March 2014

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We are reposting this blog from the Commonty and hope that readers of ecoartscotland will take a moment to reflect on Sunday at 3pm.

Casting Out

Sad Occasion in the Life of Govan’s Graving Docks
from Ruth Olden

An invitation to mark a sad occasion in the life of Govan’s Graving Docks…

On Monday the 24th of March, the Coach House Trust are moving in to the docks to clear away the pioneering ecology that has found its home here. This clearance marks the first stage of the site’s regeneration – a project led by the developer and landowner New City Vision who plan to make a high-end housing and commercial complex of this site. The dock’s Green Mantle has become host to a fascinating array of birds, invertebrate and mammals, and has also served as a place of solace and inspiration to many people.

On the eve of this clearance, a small lit vessel made of the site’s biomass will be released into the river and carried out to sea by the receding tide. This event has been made possible by the knowledge and skills contributed very kindly by the GalGael.

This will be a sad occasion, but I hope it will provide an opportunity to honour this landscape which has become important to so many. We will be gathering on Clydebrae Street next to the garage at 3pm on Sunday 30th March, before walking to the launching point together. Please do arrive at this time so there is opportunity to hear the health and safety briefing. RSVP on r.olden.1@research.gla.ac.uk 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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2014 Buckminster Fuller Challenge

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland and the Yasmin list.

SEARCH FOR COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN SOLUTIONS TO HUMANITY’S CRITICAL PROBLEMS LAUNCHED!

February 17, 2014, New York City – The Buckminster Fuller Institute formally announced the Call for Proposals to the 2014 Fuller Challenge. Recognized as “Socially-Responsible Design’s Highest Award”, the Challenge invites activists, architects, artists, designers, entrepreneurs, students and planners from all over the world to submit their innovative solutions to some of humanity’s most pressing problems. A $100,000 prize is awarded to support the development and implementation of one outstanding strategy.

Entries will be accepted until April 11, 2014.

WINNING CRITERIA: IMPACTING 100%

Buckminster Fuller called for a design revolution to “to make the world work for 100% of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone.”

Answering this call is what the Fuller Challenge is all about.

Winning entries for the last six years have applied a rare combination of pragmatic, visionary, comprehensive and anticipatory thinking to tackling issues as broad as urban mobility, coastal restoration and innovation in biomaterials packaging. BFI has created an application process for entry to the Fuller Challenge in which global changemakers grapple deeply with a unique set of criteria. Internationally renowned jurors and reviewers look for whole systems strategies that integrate effectively with key social, environmental and economic factors impacting each design solution.

GROWING BENEFITS TO ENTRY

“The Challenge program has defined an emerging field of practice – the whole systems approach to understanding and solving the interrelated crises facing us. The entry criteria have established a new framework through which to identify and measure effective, enduring solutions to global sustainability’s most entrenched challenges,” said Elizabeth Thompson, Executive Director of The Buckminster Fuller Institute. “We are committed to further supporting this emergent field through our Catalyst Program, which provides much needed additional support to select initiatives: mentoring, pro-bono legal services, consideration for fiscal sponsorship, international press coverage, special invitations to present at conferences and exhibitions, and more! We partnered with Interface in 2013 to launch this program, and we could not be more gratified that we are able to continue its development in 2014.”

FORWARD ON THE CALL!

Are you or someone you know working on a holistic solution to make the world work for 100%? Read below for more information on what we are looking for, download the full Call for Proposals, and APPLY!

Deadline for entries is Friday, April 11, 2014, at 5pm EST.

THE INSPIRATION

Buckminster Fuller led a prolific life of research, invention, writing and teaching. He developed a comprehensive systems approach to understanding complex global problems. By rigorously adhering to his unique set of “design science” principles, Fuller’s work embodies a deeply attuned ecological aesthetic. Fuller conceived and prototyped new strategies intended to enable all of humanity to live lives characterized by freedom, comfort and dignity without negatively impacting the earth’s ecosystems or regenerative ability. He emphasized that the technology and know-how already exist to successfully surmount our global challenges and advocated “doing more with less” by increasing the overall performance of every resource invested in a system.

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR

Winning the Fuller Challenge requires more than a stand-alone idea or innovation that focuses on one aspect of a system failure. BFI looks for holistic strategies that demonstrate a clear grasp of the big-picture dynamics influencing your intervention. If a proposal emphasizes a new design, material, process, service, tool or technology, it is essential that it be part of an integrated strategy that deals effectively with key social, environmental and economic factors.

BFI seeks initiatives that tackle urgent needs at a range of scales: from macro-strategies that have the potential for widespread, tangible impacts, to local, community-based initiatives with global relevance and replicability. A highly competent project team with the capacity and commitment to move the solution forward for transformative impact is essential.

Entries must meet the following criteria:

  • Visionary – put forth an original idea or synthesize existing ideas into a new strategy that creatively addresses a critical need
  • Comprehensive – apply a “whole-systems” approach to the design and implementation process; aim to address multiple goals, requirements and conditions in a holistic way
  • Anticipatory – factor in critical future trends and needs as well as the projected impacts of implementation in the short and long term
  • Ecologically Responsible – reflect nature’s underlying principles while enhancing the ability for natural systems to regenerate
  • Feasible – rely on current technology, existing resources and a solid team capable of implementing the project
  • Verifiable – able to withstand rigorous testing and make authentic claims
  • Replicable – able to be adapted to similar conditions elsewhere

Winning initiatives integrate these criteria into powerful design solutions that have the potential to play a significant role in the transition to an equitable and sustainable future for all.

To receive updates on the 2014 Fuller Challenge, please contact challenge@bfi.org

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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Aesthetics & Sustainability | Arlene Goldbard

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Clyde Research - photo Chris Fremantle

Clyde Research – photo Chris Fremantle

Arlene Goldbard’s recent blog on aesthetics and sustainability is very refreshing.  It acknowledges that we define sustainability by it’s negative, ie our current unsustainable lifestyles (and we can describe that unsustainability in myriad ways).

Arlene quotes Adrienne Goehler in sharply defining the challenge to move the idea of sustainability beyond “prohibition, asceticism, and morality” into the a relationship with, “new forms of learning. Aesthetic education means sensitive, perceptive, creative education, which, in the words of Hannah Arendt, culminates in creative action.”

If you are interested in thinking about sustainability then this is a good place to start.  Sign up for her posts.  They are always interesting.

Aesthetics & Sustainability | Arlene Goldbard.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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