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Ben’s Strategy blog: Stubborn optimism and imagination

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Three recent events provided some useful food for thought about where we are in the journey to a sustainable society, and to some extent linked up. I’ll try to bring them together here.

First an inspiring evening at Edinburgh Castle where Christiana Figueres, the architect and driving force behind the Paris Agreement, was receiving the Shackleton Medal. The medal was awarded jointly in 2016 by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to Christiana Figueres as the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, M Laurent Fabius, the French Prime Minister who chaired the 2015 Paris conference, and Manuel Pulgar Vidal, the Peruvian Environment Minister who chaired the 2014 climate conference in Lima, which was central to the success of the Paris one. Presumably Ms Figueres hadn’t been able to travel to Scotland to receive the medal in 2016, but she was here last week speaking at a number of events.

Stubborn Optimism

Figueres gave a speech highlighting two of Ernest Shackleton’s qualities. First his commitment to his team, and here she paid tribute not only to her fellow medallists but to all who are working for a better, zero-carbon world. Shackleton of course promised his men that he would return to rescue them from the icy wastes of Antarctica, and did so having made an extraordinary and perilous journey. Arguably after the divisions at the Copenhagen conference in 2009, Figueres had to deliver in Paris on a similar promise made to the poorer nations of the world in the intervening years. Second she focused on Shackleton’s ‘stubborn optimism’, which she unpacked as being an attitude that saw problems as the stimuli for innovation and an opportunity to bring people together to overcome them; and an ability to get up in the morning feeling that success was possible, despite overwhelming odds. She finished by introducing seven young climate leaders from low lying islands who were also in Edinburgh. She urged them to remember that they had come here on the ‘Peace Boat’: ‘not the Anger Boat, or the Blame Boat, or the War Boat’. Her speech was a good reminder of what an achievement the Paris Agreement is, with all its flaws, and how easy it is, in an era of Trump, Brexit and Spanish politics, not to work together – and how important working together is, whatever the circumstances. (I’d say it’s also more fun.)

More economics please

Next came the event with Professor Tim Jackson, about whom I blogged in August. His talk, hosted by the Macaulay Development trust and the James Hutton Institute was very good, although it didn’t tell me anything new that I hadn’t read in his book (which I suppose is fair enough – not everyone will have read it). I was hoping I’d get the answer to the question posed in my blog, whether Jackson’s vision of a low-carbon, post-growth society that is based on services is possible, or whether we don’t actually need some ‘stuff’, which is more carbon intensive. However this wasn’t forthcoming and I didn’t have the opportunity to ask my question…

The Q&A afterwards, with Lesley Riddoch, Patrick Harvie MSP and the economist Professsor Deborah Roberts, turned into a rather generalised discussion about the failures of classical economics and governments etc. And maybe that was part of the problem with the whole event: Jackson spent more time than was necessary explaining why we need a new economics of sustainability, and not enough on outlining what that might look like. I think the ‘why’ argument has been won since he set out on this journey in 2009, and he could now focus on the interesting and difficult thinking he’s been doing since. For example he mentioned in an aside that a Universal Basic Income is actually a less effective way of achieving the aims normally associated with it than a capital tax, which itself is less effective than the strengthening of the power of labour and constraints on the power of capital. Now that’s why I go to hear an economist speak!

The Golden Thread

And finally the annual conference of the Sustainable Scotland Network, which supports the 180-odd Public Bodies which have duties under the Climate Change Act here in Scotland. Chris Stark, the Director of Energy & Climate Change at the Scottish Government, gave a terrific talk in which he spoke about the ‘golden thread’ of energy joining up all sorts of policy areas: as his team’s Draft Energy Strategy consultation makes clear, ‘Affordable energy provision is a prerequisite for healthy, fulfilling living and productive, competitive business.’ He made clear that the easy work had been done, in largely decarbonising the electricity supply, but that domestic and non-domestic heat (which produces around 40% of Scotland’s carbon emissions) and transport (another 20% or so) would be much greater challenges. What struck me was that for the first time I heard someone from the Government hinting about a fundamental change in society, not suggesting that life in Scotland would be the same, but magically zero-carbon. He was followed by Professor Jan Webb talking about the difficulties of arranging collaborative projects to deliver the low-carbon heat Chris Stark was talking about: she proposed a general ‘Duty to collaborate’, which I think is crucial. However it would need to trump other targets and duties if it were to have any effect. It is easy to show that you have met your carbon reduction target, and to be sanctioned if you haven’t, but harder to show that you have or haven’t collaborated effectively.

Other speakers from public sector organisations at the conference sounded a bit ground down by their climate change responsibilities. Dave Gorman, Director of Social Responsibility and Sustainability at the University of Edinburgh described the position of senior managers, who have plenty of other priorities that they are trying to juggle alongside sustainability. His argument was that what they needed were clear proposals that showed how a sustainability-focused project would also deliver on those other priorities: in a way an echo of what Chris Stark was saying, and perhaps a hint about the collaboration that Jan Webb was describing.

Revolutionary thinking

Chris Stark was effectively talking about a revolution, and Jan Webb was telling us that current structures as well as current ways of thinking are not going to bring that revolution about. This is of course what we at Creative Carbon Scotland are working on: proposing different ways of doing things to get different results. As finance across government is getting tighter, there is even greater need for different ideas and collaboration across sectors and silos to achieve our common aims. There is no doubt that people at the carbon face are struggling, and that isn’t the easiest time to try out innovations, but it may also be the time when imagination is most needed. There is a long history of the arts contributing to the health, education and justice agendas but sustainability is seldom mentioned. Our mission is to make sure that culture’s role in the transition to a sustainable society is fully recognised and utilised by both the cultural and sustainabilty worlds. And we bring some of Christiana Figueres’ stubborn optimism to help overcome the significant hurdles along the way.

Image: Christiana Figueres  www.iangeorgesonphotography.co.uk



The post Ben’s Strategy blog: Stubborn optimism and imagination appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Full Programme for Green Arts Conference!

With just two weeks to go until our conference for Scottish cultural organisations, we’re excited to announce the full programme for the day!

Take a look at our Green Arts Conference Programme

Share the Programme – and tell others you’re coming – using #GreenArts!

With speakers, sustainable suppliers and attendees from across Scotland, a mix of presentations, ‘show and tell’ sessions and workshops, it’s essential for any cultural Green Champion to attend.

  • We’ll be hearing from national funding body, Creative Scotland, on what is coming for the sector around sustainability, as well as hosting several sessions on carbon management soon to be required of all Regularly Funded Organisations.
  • We’ve expanded our popular ‘show and tell’ sessions to hear from more Green Champion peers in the sector, discussing a huge range of sustainability initiatives taking place across the country: from Ayr Gaiety to the Barn, Puppet Animation Scotland to the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo! These 15 minute talks will be sharing everything from how to reach international standards of success, to how to raise funds for sustainability projects.
  • Delving into the wider context of the work of Green Arts organisations, we’ll share the expertise of some of the most sustainable suppliers in the country, before hearing from the national organisation for responding to the impacts of climate change: Adaptation Scotland. 
  • New to this year’s conference, we’ll also be running a series of short, practical workshops on key skills for Green Champions: everything from how to build an internal group to expand your capacity, to using the tools to support your carbon management.
  • Finally, we’ll be topping off the day with a drinks reception for all attendees! You can also join us in attending the opening night of Sonica Festival’s ‘Shorelines‘ with a special discount code for Green Arts Conference-goers!

The Green Arts Initiative is supported year-round by carbon neutral print company, PR Print and Design, and the Green Arts Conference will also be showcasing some of the best sustainable suppliers in the country: Take One Mediathe Green Stationary CompanyResource Efficient Scotland and Vegware!

Click here to take a look at our full programme and timetable

The conference will take place on Wednesday 1st November 2017, at Partick Burgh Halls in Glasgow. For those still to get their ticket, there are still a few spaces! Book you place via EventBrite:


If you have any questions about the event, think you have something you could share with other attendees, or fancy a conversation on arts and sustainability more generally, get in touch!

The Green Arts Initiative is supported by carbon neutral print company, PR Print and Design. If you would like more information about our range of sponsorship opportunities, please contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com.



The post Full Programme Announced for Green Arts Conference! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are pleased to announce a special offer for registered (and not-yet-registered) attendees for The Green Arts Conference. 

Cryptic, a member of the Green Arts Initiative, is offering a discount to attend the opening night of their climate-change-themed music/theatre production Shorelines, which follows directly from the conference drinks reception at 7.30pm on November 1st at Tramway in Glasgow.

About Shorelines

Shorelines is part of Sonica 2017, and has strong sustainability themes, exploring the impacts of a natural disaster, and mankind’s relationship with the natural world. As part of the Green Arts Conference this year, we’ll be exploring the artistic programming emerging along such themes (including hearing from artist Kathy Hinde, also part of Sonica 2017), and this is an opportunity for you to see some of it for yourself.

The Green Arts Conference

The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability is crafted specifically for those working on sustainability in organisations in the cultural sector, and those interested in the intersections between the arts and sustainability. This full-day conference will explore current best practice, and deliver practical, hands-on workshops on topics such as travel recording; staff green team engagement, and carbon management planning for arts organisations. Perfect for green champions in the arts, screen and creative industries, and for members of the Green Arts Initiative.

Delegates for the Green Arts Conference can get tickets for Shorelines on 1st November for £8 (instead of £15), contact us for details.

Find out more about Shorelines

Book your place at The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability

 



The post Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Craft Biennale Scotland 2018

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The inaugural Craft Biennale Scotland, to take place at the City Art Centre from May to July 2018, is now open for applications. With the theme Response to Place, this is an open international exhibition, that will be selected from applications by four curators from Scotland, Norway, Korea and Australia.

Craft Biennale Scotland is the idea of Tina Rose, founder and director of Really Interesting Objects CIC, an enterprise established to ‘bring together quality crafts practices with innovative approaches to engaging new audiences’.

Artistic Concept: ‘Response to Place’

Artists are invited to submit work that responds to a place where they live, remember or imagine, or that contributes to individual identity or nationality, and ways in which we create and express our ‘place’ in the world.

Responses may be overlapping and multi-faceted, and might for example, include visual or other sensory responses to their environment; local materials and indigenous craft practices; cultural and ceremonial traditions; experiences related to migration, political or social upheaval; local and social history; geography; archaeology or how particular forms have developed through interaction with materials or have been designed to perform a particular function.

To check the guidelines and timetable, and to register and complete the application form,please visit the website.

Deadline for Entries: Friday 1 December 2017, 5pm GMT

If you have any queries regards the submission process and guidelines, then please contact info@craftbiennalescotland.org

 



The post Opportunity: Open Call to Craft Makers – Craft Biennale Scotland 2018 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Culture Project Fund Open for Applications

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The second round of the Culture Project Fund in 2017/18 is a pilot partnership between the City of Edinburgh Council and Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo. It will allow grants of approximately £5,000 to be awarded to organisations creating new work in Edinburgh, thanks to a generous £50,000 charitable donation towards the Council’s Culture Fund Project from the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo.

The partnership extends the support available to artists in the city for locally produced performing arts projects, by helping to cover some of the costs artists face when developing new performing arts work.

The fund is open to any constituted organisation and applicants are encouraged to seek partnership support and apply for the exact funds needed. It is also open to organisations already in receipt of Council support. Applications close on Wednesday 8th November 2017 at 12 Noon and will be judged by a panel of industry specialists.

To request an application pack, please email:

culturaldevelopment@edinburgh.gov.uk.

 



The post Opportunity: Culture Project Fund Open for Applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Our Food. Our Future: Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland.

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland.

Slow Food Youth Network Scotland was started 2 years ago to encourage the development of a network of young people across Scotland who wanted to learn, debate, campaign, farm, cook, eat and dance their way to a more sustainable food future whilst exchanging ideas with young change-makers across the world.

By learning more about Scotland’s food system in a fun and social way, supporting local projects and building strong connections with the international Slow Food Youth Network – we have begun to bring people together to help create change within the global food system. In our third year, and Scotland’s Year of Young People, we want to build on our success by expanding the network and have lots of ideas to make this happen.

Join the first Slow Food Youth Network Scotland Committee!

In order to shape the future for SFYNScotland we are recruiting volunteers who can commit to join our first ‘committee’, become a local SFYN ambassador or occasional event volunteer – ideally spread across Scotland! For the coordinating committee we are looking for individuals who can commit to a minimum of 2 days per month. We’re particularly keen to hear from individuals with creative skills or expertise and/or with communications, web design, fundraising, marketing, research, illustration, campaigning, photography, events, or film-making skills (& we’re sure there’s things we haven’t thought of!)

There are also plenty of opportunities to join as an events volunteer or to become an ambassador in your local area as well! Join us at one of the volunteer sessions below to find out more or get in touch & tell us a little bit about yourself via sfynscotland@gmail.com.

Find out more:

Glasgow, Thursday October 19th, Project Cafe, Renfrew St, 10:30am – 12pm

Edinburgh, Thursday October 26th, OX 184, Cowgate, from 6pm

You can find out more about our ideas for the future in our latest newsletter. We are the world’s future leaders, entrepreneurs, farmers and consumers.

 



The post Opportunity: Our Food. Our Future: Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland. appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: #NotFakeNews, Climate Change is Real

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

OPEN CALL: #NOTFAKENEWS: CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL

  • All artists invited.
  • Bidimensional works only: mixed media, painting, drawing, photography, and digital art on paper, canvas, panel, or other support.
  • Maximum size: 9″ x 12″ inches
  • 1 work per artist
  • No jury. No returns.
  • Mail to: Artists for Climate Change, P.O. Box 11614, Caparra Heights Station, San Juan, PR 00922.
  • We request original artworks that speak to the issue of climate change. Please do not send photojournalistic work documenting natural disasters.

EXHIBITION

All works will be exhibited indefinitely on the Artists for Climate Change website along with the artwork’s title, artist’s name, and website. We are planning a local exhibition in San Juan, Puerto Rico at a museum or cultural center and plan on taking the exhibition to other parts of the world to continue raising awareness of the dangers of climate change. A selection of the best artworks received will be part of the book project: #Notfakenews: Climate change is real

BOOK PUBLISHING & MAILING TO DONALD TRUMP

A selection of the best artworks received will be part of the book project: #Notfakenews: Climate Change is Real to be mailed to President Donald Trump.

Deadline: December 31, 2017

Visit the website: artistsforclimatechange.com for full details and to read about the story behind the project.

Photo: Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico 2017, Copyright Ricardo Arduengo-Get



The post Opportunity: Open Call – #NotFakeNews: Climate Change is Real appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

How National Chamber Music Day 2017 went green

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Danielle Price from Enterprise Music Scotland shares some of the highlights, and a couple of challenges, they encountered in creating a National Chamber Music Day 2017 that ‘Goes Green’

We are Enterprise Music Scotland, the national body for chamber music who support, develop and connect the chamber music sector in Scotland.

As a Green Arts Initiative member, we have spent the past year or so looking at ways in which we can reduce our carbon footprint. While we are only a small team of three part-time staff, we work with a wide range of stakeholders including a network of chamber music promoters and professional musicians. As well as aiming to create a more environmentally friendly office space and monitoring the carbon footprint of our touring network, we have been working with Creative Carbon Scotland to facilitate conversations about the green arts with our partners and audiences.

National Chamber Music Day Goes Green

On the 16th of September, we hosted National Chamber Music Day, an annual event which celebrates classical chamber music with free performances in public places across the country. Previous years have seen chamber music ensembles play everywhere from supermarkets to cafés and castles.

This year, National Chamber Music Day went green to explore the themes of environment, sustainability and conservation. We decided that ensembles would travel to concerts via environmentally friendly modes of transport, performances would take place in venues linking to the green theme, we would work with likeminded partner organisations who support environmental sustainability and would also aim to use best practice of minimising waste for the event. We worked with 34 musicians and 34 partner organisations to put on 27 performances across the length and breadth of Scotland.

Performing in unusual places

The Monzani Trio aboard the Edinburgh Tram


Performances took place in community gardens across the country from Peebles to Ninewells Hospital garden in Dundee. It was lovely to see concerts happening against a back drop of plants and flowers and great to learn of the sustainable food projects taking place in local towns and cities.

Our aim of highlighting sustainable transport led to partnership with several Scottish transport organisations; The Monzani Trio performed onboard Edinburgh Trams while the McOpera Oboe Duo played on the Borders Rail train between Edinburgh and Galashiels and for passengers awaiting their buses at Galashiels Transport Interchange. Trio Vocali3e gave a concert at Linlithgow Canal Centre and The Highland Collective played for passengers at Inverurie Train Station.

An unexpected benefit of ‘running’ it

This year’s green theme also provided the opportunity for NCMD to expand into a multiday event. Endurance runner/violinist Elspeth Luke along with cyclist/violinist Emily Carr-Martin undertook a four-day tour of Mull. They helped to reduce the carbon emissions of NCMD even further by running and cycling to their concert venues in Craignure, Ulva, and Salen.

Elspeth Luke and Emily Carr-Martin on their tour of Mull


New partnerships

We formed new partnerships with organisations who work to support environmental sustainability, conservation and heritage. NCMD sponsors, Mackie’s of Scotland, known for their commitment to good environmental stewardship invited the locals to their farm in Aberdeenshire for their Chamber Music and Chocolate event. Audiences sampled the recently launched Mackie’s chocolate range whilst enjoying music performed by the Highland Collective.

We worked with Plantlife Scotland who hosted guided walks culminating with chamber music concerts in Glen Tanar and Barnluasgan.  In Glasgow, a partnership was made between EMS, Glasgow Doors Open Days, RSPB Wildfest and The Hidden Gardens to organise daytime performances by the Maxwell Quartet at St Andrews in the Square and Kelvingrove Park Bandstand as well as our NCMD finale which took place at the Hidden Gardens.

Audiences were invited to bring a picnic along to The Hidden Gardens and participate in various outdoor nature activities led by Wildfest followed by a concert from the Agnew McAllister Duo and The Matilda Brown Ensemble on the lawn. The concert also featured the first ever NCMD commission for which Matilda Brown composed the piece “His Wings” linking to the birdsong that can be heard in the gardens.

Enthusing audiences

We had a fantastic response from partners, performers and from members of the public

“What a fantastic day we had today! Even the drizzle didn’t put us off…”

“The music sounded fantastic as it drifted across the wider landscape…When can we do it again!”

“An inspired concept, and an amazing event – we are absolutely delighted to have been a part of it!”

I would just like to send my thanks for what was an absolutely fantastic concert at Inverurie Railway Station on Saturday 16th September. The music was stunning and it was a real treat to attend a concert in a local and unusual venue! If possible please pass on my thanks to the musicians – their playing was beautiful and their selection of music very engaging. Thank you Enterprise Music Scotland!”

A few hurdles

But we did come across some unexpected hurdles along the way…

We had planned for performances to take place outdoors but could not really rely on the good old Scottish weather meaning we had to think ahead and commit a bit more time to creating a backup option for each one.

With ensembles visiting two venues in one day, the logistics of planning travel using public transport proved challenging. In some cases, it was not possible due to lack of access at rural venues, heavy instruments, health issues and infrequent timetables. This proved to be an interesting exercise in looking at the challenges facing freelance musicians who wish to become more environmentally responsible.

While we wanted to embrace the green theme, we felt it was also important that the original NCMD mission statement continued to be represented which included performances taking place across the length and breadth of the country. With public transport, this was not always straight forward to organise. However, it did provide the opportunity for creative solutions such as Elspeth and Emily’s tour of Mull which in the end, expanded the event significantly.

Creating positive results

Matilda Brown at The Hidden Garden C Louise Mather


Despite a few challenges, we do feel that the benefits greatly outweighed the negatives. Our Green theme provided a strong stimulus during the creative process and influenced the way in which we planned the event. Collaborating with new partners who are not directly connected to the chamber music sector was a great asset in helping to advertise National Chamber Music Day to a wider audience. Venues all worked hard to spread the word about their NCMD performance in their local communities and it was great to see extras such as BBQ’s and picnics being added to performances.

We were also excited to find that we were successful in reducing carbon emissions for National Chamber Music Day. By encouraging ensembles to travel via public transport and car share, a 15% saving on carbon dioxide emissions per mile travelled was achieved meaning a saving of 63kg of Co2. The equivalent to leaving a TV on for more than 2 weeks!

Following National Chamber Music Day, we hope to continue to help raise awareness of environmental sustainability within our chamber music promoter and partner networks, providing practical advice as well as open discussion.  We’re also looking forward to exchanging ideas with other arts organisations at Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Arts Conference on 1st November in Glasgow.

 



The post Guest Blog: How National Chamber Music Day 2017 went green appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Scotland Announce Carbon Management Requirement

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

From April 2018 onwards Creative Scotland will require all Regularly Funded Organisations, as part of their funding agreements, to develop plans to reduce the carbon emissions related to at least one aspect of their activities. Organisations supported through Open Project Funding and Targeted Funding are also encouraged to do the same. These plans can be modest or ambitious but above all should be realistic, achievable and measurable.

There are already lots of examples of organisations taking action to manage their carbon emissions; whether it’s the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo saving 25,000 litres of water through installing waterless urinals, the Edinburgh Festival Fringe swap shop or Film City Glasgow offering cheaper coffee for customers using reusable cups, the Dundee Rep saving energy through installing LED lighting, or Eco-Drama touring in their van running on 100% recycled vegetable oil.

“The commitment to environmental sustainability demonstrated by the cultural sector in Scotland has already been extensive, impactful and hugely positive,” says Kenneth Fowler, Director of Communications at Creative Scotland. “Following on from carbon reporting, environmental planning is the natural next step.

“Through demonstrating best practice and inspiring audiences, we can make a huge difference in encouraging sustainable behaviour. We are very pleased to support Creative Carbon Scotland in helping creative organisations make this important contribution to Scotland’s sustainability.”

How to plan

We will work with organisations to offer a full programme of support for this new area of work. Support for creating and implementing Carbon Management Planning will consist of:

  • A Carbon Management Tool – A new recording and planning tool which will allow you to integrate your existing recording and new planning work to help you identify and assess reduction projects
  • Carbon Management Training – Training in workshops and webinars in early 2018 for individuals responsible for programming and Green Champions
  • Carbon Management Support – One to one support available by phone, email and face to face meetings on request. We will also be offering webinars on carbon management in November 2017 to early adopters to pilot and improve our support.

Carbon Management will also be a key topic at the Green Arts Conference in Glasgow on 1st November, with presentations of the tool and specific sessions to develop understanding of how to start planning.

Our support will be focused on Regularly Funded Organisations as they will be required to develop Carbon Management Plans by September 2018, but will be open to all. Organisations applying for Open Project Funding and Targeted Funding are encouraged to include Carbon Management Plans on a voluntary basis within their applications from April 2018.

Book tickets for the Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability.

Book a place on our early adopter Carbon Management webinars in November 2017.

Read more about the new Carbon Management requirements



The post Creative Scotland announce Carbon Management requirement appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Critical Forum – Call for Participants

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Many human rights documentary films are the result of a productive, creative and collaborative partnership between activists and filmmakers. This year, the Critical Forum at Document becomes a platform for yet untold and potentially powerful cinematic stories by inviting human rights organisations, activists, producers and filmmakers to share their work on the ground and spark collaborations. The forum will feature two parts: a panel with presentations of different film projects at different stages of development, focusing on challenges and collaborations. The second part will allow attendees to participate in a workshop tailored around their own projects and interests, challenges and experiences of working on human rights issues on screen and beyond. Finally, the workshop will end with a general discussion where the audience and the panelists will have the chance to give feedback and advice and inspire future projects and collaborations.

Date: 20 October 2017 | CCA Glasgow | 1-5 pm | Free but ticketed.

Apply to participate

Application Deadline: 6 October 2017

Contact: Alexandra Conta / forum@documentfilmfestival.org

Presented in collaboration with Glasgow Human Rights Network.



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About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland