Creative Carbon Scotland

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Job: Project Communications Officer (part-time, to 31st December 2020)

Creative Carbon Scotland is seeking a part-time (one day per week / 0.2FTE) Project Communications Officer for a contract from 2nd March to 31st December 2020.

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Background

Creative Carbon Scotland – a charity initiated by Festivals Edinburgh and founder members, the Federation of Scottish Theatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network – is a partnership of arts organisations working to help shape a sustainable Scotland. We believe that the arts and culture have an essential role in achieving the transformational change to a sustainable future. 

Our vision is of a Scotland where this role is fully recognised, developed and utilised by both the cultural world and others interested in sustainability. 

Our mission is therefore to connect the arts and culture with others working towards that transformational change in order to bring it about. 

Our objective is larger than achieving incremental change in small pockets: we want to form a network of creative individuals and organisations who together can alter perceptions and change society using the work they make and present, the way they operate and how they speak to the public. 

We work with artists and individuals, cultural and sustainability organisations, funders and policy makers, connecting them to the change process and exploring how the cultural sector can contribute.  

This is an exciting time for Creative Carbon Scotland (CCS) and our work. Since the declaration of the climate emergency by the Scottish Government and others we have been busier than ever and our knowledge, contacts and expertise are in constant demand. With work including two major EU projects and the COP26 in Glasgow coming up soon, we are seeking additional support in our communications work. Some of this will be supporting our collaboration with Climate Ready Clyde and Climate-KIC in the development of Clyde Re:built, a transformative adaptation strategy and plan for the Glasgow City Region, home to one third of the Scottish population. Some will relate to the COP in November. 

Therefore, we are seeking a part-time (0.2FTE) Project Communications Officer to support our Communications Manager in our press and PR work, developing project branding and templates, keeping our social media accounts up to date and lively, writing copy for our own and others’ websites, and generally implementing a complex and busy communications strategy and plan. Although CCS is based in Edinburgh, this work is largely Glasgow-focused, so being Glasgow–based would be an advantage and the ability to work independently is essential. Time is tight, so we are hoping someone can take on this role as soon as possible; ideally starting on 2nd March. CCS is a flexible organisation so work patterns can be tailored to suit the successful candidate.   

Application process  

Applications will only be accepted via the form below, unless alternative arrangements are made. If you wish to make alternative arrangements or have any problems in using the site, please write to alexis.woolley@creativecarbonscotland.com to seek assistance in good time before the closing date of midnight on Sunday 16th February (NB: this deadline was updated at 18:30 on 4th February).  

Please study the job description and person specification below closely and ensure that in your application you demonstrate clearly how your skills and experience mean that you meet the person specification and fulfil the needs of the role. Complete the form below and upload your CV, a covering letter explaining how you meet the person specification and two examples of your previous work in support of your application, as indicated on the form.  

Creative Carbon Scotland applies a strong equal opportunities approach to recruitment. To help us avoid unconscious bias when shortlisting, please do not use your name or provide your contact details on your CV or other uploads; use your initials. Do provide your name and contact details on the form. Please save your CV, letter and examples in the format [your initials_CV e.g. AB_CV], [AB_letter], [AB_eg1] and [AB_eg2].Your documents will be separated from your completed form details and we will assess your application using them only. 

We recommend submitting your documents as PDFs, though our system also accepts .doc documents. It does not accept .docx documents.

Applications must be submitted by midnight on Sunday 16th February. Interviews will take place in Glasgow on Thursday 20th February (NB: these dates were updated at 18:30 on 4 February).

Equalities

Creative Carbon Scotland is committed to equalities and welcomes applications from all qualified candidates: we will make reasonable adjustments where necessary to enable people with particular needs or requirements to work with us. Our Equal Opportunities Policy is available on our website.  Please complete the Equal Opportunities Monitoring survey here and confirm that you have done so in your application – this is anonymous and the information provided will not affect your application in any way.

Project Communications Officer – job details 

Salary: Up to £27,000, depending on experience, pro rata for 0.2 full time equivalent (1 day/week), + 3% of salary in pension contributions 

Reports to: Communications Manager

Responsible for: Any freelancers, as appropriate 

Hours0.2 full–time equivalent. This means a 7.5 hour week with a degree of flexibility on both sides, as some evening and weekend work may be required and busy periods may call for extra hours, with time taken off in lieu during quieter periods.   

Flexible working: Creative Carbon Scotland welcomes proposals for flexible working subject to the needs of the role being satisfactorily fulfilled. 

Holidays: 20 days plus 10 public holidays (pro rata) to be taken at times agreed with the Communications Manager. (For the period of this contract this will mean 3.33 days annual leave plus 1.66 days for public holidays, or four days in total.) 

Place of work: Creative Carbon Scotland is based at City Chambers, High Street, Edinburgh, but this job could be based in Glasgow at the City Chambers with others in the Climate Ready Clyde secretariat. Home working and hot-desking will be necessary. Travel throughout Scotland may be required.  

Contract and notice period: This contract is for the period 2nd March to 31st December 2020. Due to EU funding for the role, it is not possible to take this as a freelance contract – it must be an employment contract. A probationary period of two months will apply, following successful completion of which the full, fixed–term contract will be confirmed.   

Secondments Creative Carbon Scotland is very willing to consider a secondment for this role.  

Equipment: Creative Carbon Scotland is BYOD. However, a laptop and mobile phone will be provided if required.    

Job Description

Main purpose of job:  

  • To support the Communications Manager in delivering Creative Carbon Scotland’s communications strategy and plan, in particular working on the Clyde Re:built project and our work on COP26. 
Responsibilities: 

A. Communications  

Clyde Re:built (70% of the role) 

Working with the Clyde Re:built team in: 

  • Press and PR relating to the project to stimulate uptake of the opportunities it offers potential partners 
  • Developing and producing the communications and engagement strategy and bi-monthly project newsletters. 
  • Setting up and managing social media accounts to ensure that our relevant partners and audiences are fully aware of the project and their opportunities to participate in it 
  • Developing (with graphic designers, as appropriate) branding and templates for the project 
  • Co-ordinating and producing copy for the Clyde Re:built partners’ and others’ websites to a high standard 
  • Managing the design and production of relevant project print materials, such as reports and meeting documents 
  • Designing and delivering stakeholder engagement events 

COP26 (20% of the role) 

Supporting the Communications Manager to:  

  • Build awareness of Creative Carbon Scotland’s work amongst UK and international attendees at COP26 through events, social media and web materials 
  • Use the focus provided by COP26 to increase Creative Carbon Scotland’s presence in the mainstream media through press and PR work. 

B. CCS strategy and team support (10% of the role)  

  • Participating in appropriate staff and one-to-one meetings  
  • Assisting the wider team with project delivery as appropriate

C. Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion  

  • Along with all members of the team, ensuring that CCS’ Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan is considered and acted upon in all the above areas.  

The list of responsibilities is not exhaustive and the employee may be required to perform duties outside of this as operationally required and at the discretion of the Director.  

Person Specification 

Essential characteristics 

  • Strong experience in press, media and PR, including producing and editing copy to a high standard and success in placing stories in specialist and general outlets 
  • Excellent contacts in the Scottish and/or UK press and media, particularly in the cultural or environmental fields 
  • Strong experience in establishing, managing and contributing to social media accounts 
  • Experience of working with others to design branding 
  • Strong experience of writing, editing and posting copy for and to websites 
  • Knowledge of Glasgow City Region cultural, business and social scenes 
  • Demonstrable knowledge of and interest in either the climate change or the cultural world, particularly in Scotland 
  • Demonstrable ability to work effectively and efficiently with little direct supervision 
  • Flair and imagination  

Desirable characteristics 

  • Video and image editing skills for social media and website use 

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The post Job: Project Communications Officer (part-time, to 31st December 2020) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Guest blog: Solstice cycle reflections – seeking the source of the Clyde

In the midst of winter, James Bonner recalls a summer cycle I took on 21 June 2019 to the source of the River Clyde.

For the past few years I’ve sought to cycle somewhere significant on the summer and winter solstices – dates around 21st June and 21st December. These cycles have become a bit of a ritual-like pilgrimage for me.

For summer solstice this year, in the middle of my doctorate in which I am thinking about water, I thought to pedal to the source of the River Clyde – that body of water I see every day in my home city of Glasgow. I took the train to the town of Lanark and started cycling. This is some writing I did a couple of days later and, in a period in which I was struggling to write for my doctorate, this flowed out like a torrent. It fundamentally shifted the way I was writing in my research – I started to use the first person more frequently, and included much more about how I felt. It was a bit of a watershed moment for me in many ways. Reflecting on it later I started to see how it was influenced by some of the literature and writing that had been inspiring me in my research – in its ideas and style. Specifically, and as is probably evident to anyone who has read his work, the beautifully poetic words of nature writer Robert Macfarlane. And one of his influences, Scottish poet and writer, Nan Shepherd.

In academia it seems we learn to explain our research in terms of what we ‘think’, but often forget to explore how it makes us ‘feel’.

On Friday 21st June 2019, for solstice, I cycled to water. This is a short account of that journey:

I left Lanark on my bike with a rough course in mind to follow the Clyde to its source. I stayed as close to the water as roads allowed me, criss-crossing the river several times. Leaving it, but then coming back. It would disappear, then reappear, as I moved. For a long stretch I followed it near the motorway. A stream of cars and people to one side. The river to the other. I felt more for, and of, the latter.

After about 40km I left the main road toward Daer Reservoir – understood to be the ‘source’ of the Clyde. I talked to sheep to give them forewarning so they could clear from the road ahead. Some kites came down to look at me and swooped overhead. We moved together for some time.

Crossing the river more and more, it was increasingly moving in a lazy meander. Its path less constrained and ‘rational’. It is shaped by the landscape’s topography, but also forming the land as it went. A relationship of water and rock – creating and reshaping one another.

The road got rougher – moments to be apprehensive on a road bike. You worry about your tyres. But, at the same time you think this means I am further ‘away’, and that’s what I wanted. And that contradiction and unsureness is good.

I cycled on and eventually came to the reservoir. A gleaming body of water opened up – beautiful and peaceful. But there were warning signs. Danger, deep water, private. Water gives life, but it can take it. It doesn’t make sense. On along the waterside. I only planned to come this far and the road is narrowing. But I was flowing and I kept going.

I was intrigued. I was at the ‘source‘. The start. But at the ‘end’ of the reservoir I could see several smaller streams flowing into the water. And when I got there it was clear that this wasn’t the ‘source’. Feeding the reservoir are dozens of different sized streams and little watercourses. Coming down from the hills, the valley beyond, out of the landscape itself.

While my map indicated this is the ‘start’, being there it was clear that this is not the case. There is a water ‘behind’ or ‘beyond’ the water. A whole other layer. There is no ‘source’ or ‘start’. No linear narrative. The Clyde doesn’t ‘begin’- it’s a gathering process of its everyday, every-minute, every-second, emergent being. Where waters assemble and dissemble. Merge and separate. Shift and shape. And this NEVER stops. Any ‘map’, no matter its accuracy, paused this flow. It couldn’t ever represent the lived ‘reality’.

I was too far now and hungry. A gate, gladly, stopped me going further. I got off my bike at one of the many little streams that were not on my map. Hidden waters that don’t ‘count’. Water beyond the water – sources of the source. As ever, I TOUCHED the water’s surface. And when I did, I was sensing a few droplets of water molecules – the ones surrounding the surface of my hand. I ‘know’ this, as science tells me so.

But I have come to ‘know’ for something else about water. That when my skin touches the skin of the water, I am touching the whole stream. And the stream joins the reservoir. And that makes the Clyde. And that travels all the way back to Glasgow, and eventually to the sea. And that sea is part of the ocean. And all oceans.

That’s hard to comprehend. How to make sense of that? It’s ‘non-sense’, surely! But, at that moment of touch, it makes complete sense. A common sense.

The water and I have some ‘thing’ in common. We are the same. I am touching it. It is touching
me.

I am the water, and it me.


James Bonner is doctoral researcher and research assistant at the University of Strathclyde

The post Guest blog: Solstice cycle reflections – seeking the source of the Clyde appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Ben’s Strategy Blog: The pain and pleasure of long-distance rail journeys

In November, five colleagues from Scotland, two from Dublin and three from Ghent in Belgium travelled by train to Gothenburg in Sweden for the second of four ’transnational meetings’ as part of the Creative Europe project Cultural Adaptations, of which Creative Carbon Scotland is the leader.

It was a long journey (two days +) from Scotland and Ireland, but provided an ideal opportunity to put Creative Carbon Scotland’s money where my mouth has been for some time now, as I have argued that the cultural sector, and everyone else, needs to cut back on air travel in response to the climate emergency. In a previous blog I provided some tips about how to plan and book a long distance train journey, so in this one I’ll write about the experience, challenges and pleasures of the trip. 

As I’ll explain below it wasn’t totally smooth and I recognise that train travel for work reasons is not feasible for everyone; some of our team did fly because they had work and family commitments. The trip from Scotland or Ireland to Gothenburg goes via London, Brussels (overnight), Hamburg and Copenhagen (overnight). On the way, because of time zones and schedules, it is two and a half days; on the way back, you can do it in two days, overnighting at Hamburg. See Seat61.com here for advice. 

Costs 

I have to admit it was costly, compared to flying – though the comparison is probably not quite as bad as you’d think. For the five from Creative Carbon Scotland to get from Edinburgh city centre to Gothenburg city centre it cost just over £350 each, including overnights (although not food). The cost of a return flight with baggage for one of our colleagues who flew was £366, but you need to add to that the cost of getting to and from the airports at each end, and the fact that his flights meant that he couldn’t attend the first (admittedly optional) event of the meeting. To do so he’d have had to leave at an unearthly hour to catch a more expensive flight, which would probably have meant a night in a hotel, or to have travelled the day before and overnight in Gothenburg, adding to the costs. There are very cheap flights from Edinburgh to Gothenburg, but only on certain days, so he had to go via Frankfurt, probably doubling his carbon emissions.  

Time 

Again, I have to admit it was a long trip, which not everyone could take the time to do (freelancers for whom every lost day of work costs them even more; people with small children, people whose quite unreasonable employers won’t let them have that sort of time etc.). Taking the flight via Frankfurt, it meant leaving central Edinburgh by about 11am and our colleague arrived at about 10pm local time, so ten hours in total. 

Equalities 

If you use a wheelchair or have other mobility impairments, if you’re blind or have other disabilities, such a long journey would be very difficult, if not impossible: the sheer number of changes, some quite tight, the getting to and from hotels etc and the working out of what to do if a cancellation or delay occurs would make it very tricky. 

Use of time 

This was interesting. I’m a good worker on trains – I set writing and reading work aside that I know I can do without perfect wi-fi and that needs a period of undisturbed concentration. I sit myself down in a window seat with a table and just get to it. I did some useful work of that sort on this trip, but less than I had planned, largely I think because I was travelling with more people and we kept having good conversations! It was also at the weekend, which probably meant I felt less required to work.  

There were some disruptions to our travel, which meant I had fewer tables to work at and busier trains. But this turned out to be great bonding time: arriving at Flensburg (in Schleswig-Holstein, near the German/Danish border, since you ask) just as the café was closing, we had to transfer to a dreaded Bus Replacement Service (I thought these were characteristic of the UK, but apparently not) because our train from Hamburg had broken down. We all bought wine and snacks and had a great time, devising quizzes, playing games and generally getting to know each other, finally arriving in Copenhagen very late at 1.30am. I genuinely think this had a positive impact on the transnational meeting, as we had done quite a lot of the initial getting to know each other and had had some very useful discussions on the way. 

Deutsche Bahn (the German railway company) 

When it comes to disruptions, one of the big surprises for me was that just about every Deutsche Bahn train that we got was either cancelled, delayed so that we missed a connection or broke down! So much for Vorsprung durch Technik. There’s an important economic point here, backed up by a German friend I spoke to over Christmas. The current German government has a strict ‘no budget deficit’ policy, the Black Zero, which means they haven’t been investing in infrastructure. My friend and I discussed my problems with the trains, which he says are typical. The German Green Party, which has long moved on from being the single-issue pressure group that many Green parties are seen as around the world, is arguing for greater investment in infrastructure, green energy and transport

The tips and lessons

This was a useful experiment. We learned a great deal about what it means to undertake this sort of trip by train and gained some useful tips i.e. stay in hotels close to the station! avoid Deutsche Bahn!). Generally, I had a good time and I think my fellow travellers did too. We certainly got to know each other better, in a way which I think would be unusual in the rest of our work lives. 

On the other hand, unlike getting to Belgium, the Netherlands, western Germany and most of France, which you can easily reach in a day, it’s difficult to recommend travelling to Sweden from Scotland by train rather than air because of the financial and the time issues. But I’d argue that this should make us ask whether trips are necessary and appropriate, rather than that we should just board planes willy-nilly. I’m not the only one to make this claim: we all know about Coldplay deciding not to tour until they can sort out the carbon emissions; and Massive Attack are mapping the impacts of their touring. Less publicised is change in the fairly conservative world of classical music: as the agent Jasper Parrott wrote in the Guardian in December: ‘Musicians and artists need to be disruptive in challenging assumptions about how our industry operates – and we all need to make real changes.’ When classical music agents, who make their money out of sending large numbers of players abroad, are getting with the project, something at last is happening.  

Closer to home, Amateo, the European Network for Active Participation in Cultural Activities, managed by our own Jim Tough, recently encouraged members to travel to (possibly easier to reach than Sweden) Utrecht in the Netherlands by sustainable means, and the Informal European Theatre Meeting has been talking to Creative Carbon Scotland about how it reconciles the challenge of global heating with its structure of members from over 50 countries meeting regularly in different parts of Europe. Meanwhile, academics, another band of heavy travellers, are also beginning to face the facts. However, COP26 in Glasgow in November will cause a vast amount of air travel – and I see no change taking place there. 

‘Credibility-enhancing displays promote the provision of non-normative public goods’ 

I recognise this is a challenging issue for most people working in the arts and probably quite a lot in climate change: travel is a part of work and domestic life, and convenient air travel particularly is a difficult one to give up both practically and emotionally. I’ve been banging on about it for ages, and I have worried that I’m just ‘virtue signalling’ to make myself feel better. So I was pleased to see an article in Nature (you may only be able to access the abstract), which confirms that ‘people who themselves engage in a given behaviour will be more effective advocates for that behaviour than people who merely extol its virtues—specifically because engaging in a behaviour credibly signals a belief in its value.’ (Todd et al, Nature 563, pp245-248 October 2018). To which end I’m proud to say that in recent months I’ve foregone appealing trips to Turku in Finland and Lisbon in Portugal, and I’ve turned down forthcoming opportunities to go to Portugal (again) and the lovely and prestigious Banff Centre for the Performing Arts in Canada, instead delivering talks by video and Q&As by video-conferencing. The team and I at CCS are getting better at doing this to a high standard.

Meanwhile, I’m off to Belfast this weekend by bus and ferry for an ill-advised 96th birthday party – a route that is shockingly ill-served by the UK’s transport network, which says something about how Northern Ireland is perceived in our country. Bon voyage! 

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: The pain and pleasure of long-distance rail journeys appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenArts Day 2020: Save the Date!

Get involved in  #GreenArts Day : the annual online celebration of our movement for a sustainable Scotland ! #GreenArts Day is taking place on Wednesday 18th  March from 10am, across Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.   

In the past #GreenArts day has reached over a million people on Twitter alone. With 2020 set to be a massive year for climate action in Scotland, we want to make this year’s #GreenArts Day the biggest ever and we need your help to do it!

What can you expect from #Green Arts Day?
  • Inspiration and community Member organisations of the Green Arts Initiative will be posting about their work on social media, celebrating their achievements and sharing their plans for the future.
  • The Launch of the Green Arts Initiative Annual Report This report synthesises our members annual reporting on the actions they’ve taken, and the ambitions they have for their environmental sustainability efforts. We’ll be live publishing the 2019-20 report as part of #GreenArts Day, sharing their wealth of experience and insight.
  • Examples of Green Arts projects We will release new detailed case studies about work that has been done by members of the Green Arts Initiative this year, adding up to date projects to our already extensive catalogue of case studies.
  • Announcements and News #GreenArts Day is a great moment to announce new initiatives to achieve even more ambition in creating a better, more sustainable Scotland (and world). Tune in to catch announcements from Green Arts Initiative members or others.
  • Questions to prompt your own green arts thinking Over the course of the day, we’ll also be posing key questions that the Green Arts community is working on, challenging the cultural sector and those participating in it to develop the ideas which underpin all our efforts towards a sustainable Scottish cultural sector.
How can you get involved?
  • Tweet or retweet using the hashtag #GreenArts on Twitter, or post on Instagram or Facebook. Tweet or post:
    • about the role of arts and culture in addressing environmental issues
    • about what you or your organisation has done this year
    • photos or images of performances, projects, your Green Arts Initiative sticker, your Green Team
  • Follow Creative Carbon Scotland on TwitterInstagram, or Facebook.
  • Spread the word to your friends, colleagues, and audiences about #GreenArts Day, put on an event or a #GreenArts Day party!

And if you are a Green Arts Initiative member:

  • Share with us what you’ve been doing this year. We’re particularly keen to hear about case studies or receive photos.
  • Involve the rest of your team. Use #GreenArts Day as an excuse to engage other members of staff in the important work you are doing.
  • Let your audiences know that it’s #GreenArts Day. Integrate it into your programming. Hold a talk or discussion.

If you have any thoughts, ideas, plans, or questions you want to share, please get in touch with lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.

The post #GreenArts Day 2020: Save the Date! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Creative engagement with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project

This February Creative Carbon Scotland will travel to the Outer Hebrides in the North West of Scotland to support a series of workshops seeking community input into the development of the first ever marine conservation plan for the region.

Last year we partnered up with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project to support the inclusion of a creative approach to engaging communities in the Outer Hebrides. This was to establish what’s important to residents about their seas and how Marine Protected Areas could help to deliver benefits for people and nature. We’re happy to be joining the team again in the next round of events taking place across Lewis, Harris, North and South Uist and Barra.

Seas of the Outer Hebrides

The Seas of the Outer Hebrides project is working directly with communities and marine users to identify the best way to manage Marine Protected Areas in the region for the benefit of people and nature.

Over the coming years the project will deliver a regional management plan for the Outer Hebrides Marine Region, putting communities and people at the heart of the process and building consensus on the future management of Marine Protected Areas in the islands.

A key aim of the project is to build a shared vision for Marine Protected Areas in the region. Creative Carbon Scotland is proud to be supporting this by involving artists and creative practices to help explore the cultural dimension of resident’s relationship to their seas.

Upcoming events

In these upcoming events we’re pleased to be working with artists, Kirsty O’Connor (North Uist) and Sandra Kennedy (Lewis), who are supporting the design and delivery of the workshops alongside the Seas of the Outer Hebrides team combining different visual arts methods with group discussions and mapping activities during the events.

Events schedule

  • South Uist – Talla Chidhe, Lochboisdale – Friday 7th February
  • Barra – Castlebay College – Saturday 8th February
  • North Uist – Lochmaddy Village Hall – Monday 10th February
  • Harris – Leverburgh Village Hall – Monday 10th February
  • Uig, Lewis – Uig Community Centre – Tuesday 11th February
  • Stornoway, Lewis – An Lanntair – Wednesday 12th February

These events are aimed primarily at island residents but if you have any questions or would like to find out more about Creative Carbon Scotland’s involvement in the project please contact Gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com  You can learn more about the Seas of the Outer Hebrides on the project website. 


The post Creative engagement with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Hidden doors commission – Traquair Maze

Up to five commissions available to create hidden doors in the Traquair Maze.

Traquair’s Maze is the largest hedged maze in Scotland and was planted in 1981. It covers approximately ¼ acre and is planted with a mix of Cyprus Leylandi and beech. It is visited by thousands of adults and children every year and is one of the main attractions at Traquair.

Proposal

We would like to commission up to five hidden “doors” in the Traquair Maze to add another intriguing dimension and a further element of surprise.

We invite artists/designers to design and install some innovative doorways in the Maze. The doors would be inserted into the hedge structure and would provide a short cut, or not, to the footpath on the other side.

The doorways could be either proper working doors or perhaps false doors, tiny doors or natural doorways. However, it is envisaged that the majority of these doorways will be permanent fixtures so artists should bear in mind the materials used should be sustainable and also that this is a public space so designs should be able to withstand use by children and not present any dangers.

The theme of “hidden histories” will be explored in 2020 as Traquair’s own history is filled with secrets and the concept of hiding and disguise was a necessity due to the family’s allegiance to the Jacobite cause and as Roman Catholics they were forced to hide their religious beliefs and political allegiances.

Fee

4/5 commissions are available – each receiving a fee of £1000.

Timescale

Applications will close on Friday 10th April 2020.
Implementation and installation over the summer months with opening planned in September. There will be an opportunity to exhibit your work and developments for this project in the Pavillion Galleries at Traquair.

How to Apply

Please email Catherine Maxwell Stuart and include:
Reasons for your interest in this project and how it relates to your current practice;
An outline vision of your idea for the project
Please also include:
• Your CV/artist statement
• Four examples of your recent work
• Website/online links to view your work

The post Opportunity: Hidden doors commission – Traquair Maze appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Freelance Exhibitions Photographer Call-Out

Edinburgh Printmakers are looking for exhibition/installation/architectural/events photographers with a proven track record of being able to construct high-quality images that document the atmosphere and presence of exhibitions and details of artwork within.

Job summary

Edinburgh Printmakers are a major contemporary arts space and one of primary centres for print in Europe. We function to support and facilitate artists and creative practitioners. We engage wide audiences in beautiful critically engaged exhibitions and contemporary print practice in our year-round programmes of exhibitions, events and educational experiences.

We are looking to build relationships with photographers based in Edinburgh, Lothians, Scotland and beyond who can capture the essence of exhibitions and associated events in compelling images. We ask interested individuals to share their portfolio of relevant images, and their day/half day rate, with the intention to match you with projects that would benefit from your style and ability as a documentation photographer.

We require photographers to take images of artistic installationsobjects and exhibitions, as well as documentation of people engaging in creative settings and events. We want to work with photographers who will use their artistic and technical skills to create images that are appropriate to the work, within existing compositions and with the ability to work with natural light-conditions where necessary. Applicants should have skills in retouching.

Own studio/lighting equipment preferred.

Please submit your portfolio, rates and any additional relevant information to Judith Liddle by 10am Tuesday 18th February.

The post Opportunity: Freelance Exhibitions Photographer Call-Out appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Visual Artist and Craft Maker Awards (VACMA) Edinburgh

Funding available for Edinburgh based visual artists and craft makers.

Visual artists and craft makers are invited to apply for a new round of grants of between £500 to £1,500 for the development of their practice.

Visual Artist and Craft Maker Awards – awards grants to individual artists/makers towards costs in developing new work. Awards of between £500 and £1500 are available.

New Graduates/Emerging Artists Bursary – £500 bursaries are available to new graduates/emerging artists/makers who have less than three years’ track record outside of education or training or graduated since 2016.

Development/Mentoring Bursary – the bursary programme will support up to two successful applicants to develop and progress their creative practice over 12 months. The successful applicant will be awarded £1,500 as a bursary.

Deadline: Tuesday, 4 February 2020, 5pm

To find out more come along to the Edinburgh local advice session taking place on Friday, 24 January 2020, 10am at the City Art Centre. For further information and to book a place, visit VACMA Edinburgh Local Advice Session.

For further information and application pack contact:

Jo Navarro, Cultural Development Officer
Tel: 0131 529 6716
Email: jo.navarro@edinburgh.gov.uk
Visit: VACMA Edinburgh

Further helpful general information/advice about VACMA funding is available on Creative Scotland’s website.

The post Opportunity: Visual Artist and Craft Maker Awards (VACMA) Edinburgh appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: The Art of Energy

The Art of Energy competition at the University of St Andrews

Envisioning life with energy | Art competition

How would you artistically conceptualise our current energy predicament where we need to balance energy demand with concern about human-driven climate change? How can we make sense of the entanglement of life with energy in the past, present and future?

It is our pleasure to invite you to take part in the Art of Energy competition at the University of St Andrews. We seek submissions on the topic of energy that engage creatively with the following challenge:

Global energy demand continues to rise. To meet this demand energy producers are increasingly relying on innovative methods of harvesting energy from fossil fuels, nuclear and renewable sources. At the same time, public concern about the impact of anthropogenic climate change is growing, alongside tense conflicts over the human and environmental impact of energy production, distribution, consumption and waste-handling. Recognising that this energy predicament has no simple answer, this predicament raises fundamental questions about what we consider to be right or good, and the kinds of energy futures we envision for ourselves, our communities, and future generations around the world.

We are seeking art submissions of any of the following kinds:
  • Visual arts (e.g. sound installations, video, filmmaking, photography, printmaking, drawing, painting, ceramics, mixed media)
  • Spoken word submissions (e.g. poems)
  • Short essays (700-800 words)

There will be cash prizes for the top three finalists across categories: £500, £200, £100.

All participants will have their work exhibited at the Byre, St Andrews, on 1 April 2020. Finalists will have their work also exhibited at the Energy Ethics 2020 symposium on 2 April 2020 in Parliament Hall, St Andrews.

The three finalists will also be invited to attend an invitation-only dinner on 2 April with the symposium’s special guests. We hope you will join us. All Art of Energy participants are warmly invited to also attend the symposium.

The deadline for registering AND submitting is 20 March 2020.

Register here to participate

Submissions must either be emailed to energyethics2020@st-andrews.ac.uk or delivered to:

Lisa Neilson
Department of Social Anthropology
University of St Andrews
71 North Street
St Andrews, KY16 9AL

Please contact the organisers Anna Rauter and Dr Sean Field at energyethics2020@st-andrews.ac.uk with any questions.

The post Opportunity: The Art of Energy appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Island Going 2020 – Outer Hebrides residency

Island Going is an ocean- and island-based creative residency based in the Outer Hebrides

In partnership with Ocean Guides* and building on the success of three previous land- and sea-based residencies for An Lanntair within an established residency programme, this Summer’s ‘Island Going’ residency runs for 11 days – six days at sea and five days on land, for five participants, offering the potential to explore the ocean and island environments of the Outer Hebrides, including the St. Kilda archipelago.

In addition to this our residencies come with an ethos of supporting the communities that they are based in, utilising local knowledge, services and expertise as well as providing a window into the language and culture of the islands.

We aim to benefit those communities and foster links between them and the wider world, building a greater understanding of island living and the challenges that the people and the ecosystems of the Outer Hebrides and other island Nations face in the Anthropocene – such as climate changeeconomic sustainability and cultural and linguistic identity.

Key to our residency programme is an acknowledgment of the rich Gaelic culture of the islands and the role local ‘indigenous’ knowledge plays in the understanding of the past – and how that informs the present. This is embodied in the George Macleod book Muir is Tir/Land and Sea – on which the residency is loosely based.

The vessel for the voyage, Ocean Search will be the accommodation and means of transport for the voyage, offering the opportunity to sail under the expert guidance of the skipper and crew Andrew and Meg Rodger, owners of Ocean Guides as well as the chance to use her scientific kit, which includes a hydrophone for listening to and recording cetaceans, underwater cameras for observing the seabed to 40m, sidescan sonar to search for underwater features such as reefs or wrecks, and a seabed grab sampler.

The first part of the residency will be spent on Ocean Search exploring the coastline and islands of the St. Kilda archipelago and the Sound of Harris. The second part of the residency will be based on land staying at John’s Bunkhouse on the fascinating island of Berneray, located part way between the Isle of Harris and North Uist, where participants will have time to reflect on the ocean-based time, develop ideas from the voyage, and/or undertake further research and creative exploration on the island with the support of An Lanntair’s Project Curator – Jon Macleod.

Costs + what the residency provides

£1400 – this includes:

  • Six days boat charter, skipper and crew, food on board the boat
  • Five days accommodation at John’s Bunkhouse on the island of Berneray
  • Creative support to help facilitate projects and discuss ideas during the residency
  • Curatorial support towards developing residency work further
  • Guidance and support on the land based part of the residency
  • Collection and drop off at airport or ferry terminals
  • Exhibition opportunities at An Lanntair – in discussion with curatorial staff
  • The opportunity to develop ideas further in a Residency Journal format
  • A residency library of selected titles and suggested reading list

In the past the residency has often proved a dynamic research arena for collaborative practice, the nature of the experience proving rewarding for the cross-fertilisation of ideas.

Application details

The residency is open to International and UU-based artists and is multidisciplinary in its approach – places have been offered to writers, dancers, filmmakers etc. in the past.

Please send a 300-word statement outlining your intent for the residency + a 500 summary of your practice. Please provide examples of previous works in jpeg format (8 max) and/or website/blog/vimeo etc. to jon@lanntair.com.

Closing date: 14th February 2020

Successful applicants will be informed by 21st February

Find further information on Island Going 2020 or An Lanntair’s residency page.

*Visit the Ocean Guides website

** We can offer letters of support for selected participants applying for grants for the residency.

The post Opportunity: Island Going 2020 – Outer Hebrides residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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