Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Call for 2020 Fringe Central Events Programme

Expressions of interest now open!

Fringe Central is the participants’ hub, which runs during August each year for all Fringe artists.

It’s also the location for the Fringe Central Events Programme: a series of professional development workshops, seminars, discussions and creative labs throughout the month of August, to help participants develop their skills, expand their perceptions, build networks, advance their careers and look after their overall health and wellbeing during the Fringe.

The call is out now for expressions of interest for the 2020 programme, the content of which will be influenced, for the third time, by a Youth Panel.

Key areas the Fringe is interested in developing and strengthening for 2020 are:

  • Health and wellbeing
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Environmental sustainability

If you’ve got an idea you think might be great for Fringe Central, submit your proposal!

Deadline is 4th March 2020 (with a final copy/artwork deadline of 20th March 2020)

For more information, please see the Open Call and the Event Proposal form.

The post Opportunity: Call for 2020 Fringe Central Events Programme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Guest Blog: “Let’s Go!” The Launch …

Blog #6 in a series of blogs from playwright Lewis Hetherington about his work with Glasgow cycling charity Bike for Good and Creative Carbon Scotland.

I can’t believe it’s almost six weeks since the launch of Let’s Go! our film about cycling, community and climate change after many months of getting to hang out with the wonderful people of Bike for Good. The premiere was, fittingly, at their Southside Hub. We were delighted that this film, celebrating their ethos, was first publicly viewed in the place it was made, with so many of the film’s stars amongst the audience.

We had the red carpet out, a twelve-piece brass band called Brass Aye?, a giant golden throne, flower bedecked archways, not to mention an extensive selection of fancy dress for those who wanted to glam up for the event. Not a single thing was bought or made for the event; it was all borrowed, repurposed, upcycled… It felt so important that the design matched the politics of the film. It certainly made me think how vital it is that we consider every part of an artistic process as green, not just the content. It’s totally possible to create spectacle without it costing the earth.

Crowd clapping and smiling

The centrepiece was, of course, the film itself, presented on a pedal-powered projector no less! The projector needed two bikes going at some lick to be operational. As a matter of fact, the projector did fail a few times! This lapse in power was great; it really drew attention to the amount of energy it takes to run even a relatively small and domestic piece of technology. At the heart of this film, I think, is a gentle but firm and steady plea to re-imagine our relationship to the world, by considering the impact of our everyday existence. The simple act of seeing the effort it takes to power a projector really underlined this idea.

two girls on stationary bikes

We showed the film twice to a packed room – some people stayed to watch it both times! The feeling of compassionate interaction on screen was mirrored by the warmth and generosity of those watching. We had plenty of volunteers to pedal the bikes and provide power; noticeably far more young volunteers than older ones. There were scores of young people ready to put their energy into making things happen, a hopeful metaphor for the future perhaps, but I’m looking at us grown-ups to say – we still have to step up. We can’t just cross our fingers for the next generation sorting it out.  It’s not about feeling bad, it’s about taking action, wherever we can, whenever the opportunity presents itself, to make the choice to make the world better.

Festive audience sitting inside

After each screening we invited people to sit on our giant golden throne and talk about the film to ask what had caught their attention? What had it made them think about? At the end of Let’s Go! one of the young people was asked what he would do if he was King of Glasgow, and he said, rather brilliantly, that he would “be nice to people”.

Child sitting on a golden throne being filmed

So we invited people to comment on what they would do if they were in charge. The answers were as varied, brilliant and bonkers as you might expect. We’re currently working through all the footage to make a series of mini films, which we can’t wait to share early next year.

Once again it was almost all young people that came forward. Their plans and environmental ambitions were hugely optimistic and uncompromising, and maybe that’s what we need; wide-eyed energy, hope and a total refusal to accept that we are aiming for anything other than perfection. We might not get all the way there, but if perfect is our direction of travel then one might hope we’re at least on the right path.

Watch “Let’s Go!” here.

Photography: Michal Lausch.


Read the other blogs in this series:

#5: Meaning Making (July 2019)

#4: I CAN’T WAIT TO DRIVE A CAR! (April 2019)

#3: Crises. Crocuses. Creativity. (February 2019)

#2: The joy of the present and the great unknown of the future (September 2018)

#1: Can Cycling Save the World? (July 2018)


This embedded artist project is part of Bike for Good’s VeloCommunities Project, which is funded by the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund.

Please get in touch with Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT Producer Gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com if you wish to find out more about this project or more about other culture/SHIFT projects which support collaborations between artists and environmental initiatives.

The post Guest Blog: “Let’s Go!” The Launch … appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: UK theatres grants scheme open for applications

Theatres, apply now to Theatres Trust UK Theatres Small Grants Scheme for urgent building work.

Applications for the next round of the UK Theatres Small Grants Scheme are being accepted.

It is a capital fund set up by the Theatres Trust to award up to £5,000 to theatres across the UK run by charities and not-for-profit groups.

Priorities include projects that address urgent building repairs, improve operational viability, introduce environmental improvements, and enhance physical accessibility. Please note that applications for technical equipment and refurbishment of soft furnishings are a low priority for the scheme.

Deadline for applications is Monday 3 February 2020 at noon.

www.theatrestrust.org.uk/uk-theatres-small-grants-scheme

The post Opportunity: UK theatres grants scheme open for applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Stalled Spaces – Call for Projects

Stalled Spaces – a community fit for a wee bit.

Local groups and organisations across Glasgow are invited to submit proposals for temporary activation of any stalled or underused open spaces in the city. We are looking for projects that are innovative and socially engaged that can breathe life into stalled spaces and create a positive impact on the area.

Funding is available from a minimum of £1000 to a maximum of £4500.

The closing date for applications is Friday 17th January at 5pm.

For more information, please visit the Stalled Spaces website.

The post Opportunity: Stalled Spaces – Call for Projects appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Library of Creative Sustainability: New USA-based Case Studies

We’ve just launched a new set of Library of Creative Sustainability case studies, looking at four different US-based examples of projects that make use of the arts to achieve sustainability goals. We’re using this as an opportunity to think a bit about what we can learn from arts and environmentalism in the USA and how this relates to the situation for us in Scotland.

The new case studies

The four new case studies look at:

  • City as Living Laboratory: an NGO that aims to promote environmental awareness and sustainable development in cities through collaborative artist-led projects.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council Artist in Residence: An artist residency run by an environmental campaigning organisation that uses art as a means of developing strategies and engaging the public in new ways.
  • Recycled Artist in Residence: a scheme organised by a waste management and recycling company that provides artists with the opportunity to produce work using or in response to the waste materials that arrive on site.
  • Maintenance Art: The fourth article looks at the artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles’ earlier pioneering work in environmental, socially aware art practices that arguably prepared the ground for the other three projects discussed.
Maintenance Art 5

Mierle Laderman Ukeles in conversation with a New York Sanitation Department employee

What can we learn from them?

Firstly, these projects demonstrate the varying roles that artists can have within organisations and projects. Although two of the schemes are described as residencies, they are really rather different. Recycled Artist in Residence provides resources that allow artists to pursue their own distinct projects while the Natural Resources Defense Council integrates an artist fully into their operation, giving them a role in determining the direction of the organisation. City as Living Laboratory by contrast is artist-led and partners with various organisations to share expertise and develop projects.

Secondly, these projects maximise the potential of artists by providing them with time and resources as well as including them from an early stage of organisation. As a result the creative input from artists is able to shape the direction of projects themselves as well as providing the means of communication.

Thirdly, art invites different forms of interaction and engagement that might not be possible otherwise. The individual artistic projects that form part of City as Living Laboratory’s larger schemes provide opportunities to get thoughts from communities that can feed back into wider goals, while the work that Jenny Kendler undertook with the Natural Resources Defense Council allowed them to access and involve members of the public in new ways, reaching new audiences. Art can be a highly valuable method for crossing the barrier between institutions and members of the public.

Finally, connections and collaborations are essential. Ukeles had plenty of ideas on how to produce art that engaged with ‘maintenance’ but no resources to work with. The New York Sanitation Department was carrying out a lot of work in this area but had no means of communicating about it. The symbiotic artist-institution collaboration thus allowed them to fulfil each others needs. This is true of all four case studies. The flexible skills and working practices of artists make them particularly suited to these kinds of collaborative relationships.

Natural Resources Defense Council Artist in Residence 1

Jenny Kendler with her Milkweed Dispersal Balloons

How does this compare to Scotland?

There are clearly important differences between the US and Scottish contexts. The most obvious one is scale. The size of cities in Scotland would likely invite different responses to those created by City as Living Laboratory in response to American cities for example. Scottish projects would also have to deal with more historic cities with different types of urban planning and potentially older infrastructure to contend with, which would raise new issues and provoke alternative approaches.

To some extent the Scottish environment bares similarity with the US. For example, issues around population being split highly unevenly between dense urban areas (the American east coast, the Central Belt) and sparse rural areas (the Midwest, the Highlands) could be comparable.

On the other hand, the changes in climate that Scotland will see over the coming years (increased rainfall, more extreme temperatures) are different from those that the US will face (water shortages, extreme weather events), and there is no real US equivalent to Scotland’s island communities and the particular environmental issues associated with them. While Jenny Kendler’s project with the Natural Resources Defense Council was concerned with Monarch Butterflies and Milkweed, the flora and fauna that are essential to protect in Scotland are quite different and would require different solutions. Similarly, Scotland’s extensive coastline, peatlands, and moors provide ecosystems that require their own unique solutions.

There is perhaps a longer tradition of embedded artist projects in the US, but this is not to say that Scotland is entirely lacking in older precedents (see our Glenrothes Town Artist article for an example of this). Nevertheless, there is arguably more need for the development of institutions around this kind of practice in Scotland than in the US, with embedded artists in environmental projects, notwithstanding exceptions like Climate Ready Clyde, being relatively rare .

This inevitably raises questions about differences in funding  but these new case studies seem to reiterate the same problems as we find here in Scotland. Namely, the difficulty of funding projects that straddle the divide between arts and sustainability and  issues with the extended timescales that embedded artist projects tend to require.

In essence, these case studies provide good models to work from, but there is no single approach that works in all circumstances. Applying the methods that these organisations have employed in Scotland must involve careful thinking about how they could work when applied to different urban and rural environments, different ecosystems, and different institutional structures.

The post Library of Creative Sustainability: New USA-based Case Studies appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Valuing Arts and Arts Research

Research paper published by the Valuing Nature Programme as part of their Demystifying Series.

We live in a period of unprecedented environmental change that demands us to completely re-think the ways we collaborate in doing research and evolve our systems of governance and economics. Informed decisions require the integration of knowledge from different perspectives, and the participation of diverse stakeholders including civic society. Navigating multiple types of value in the study of natural environments can challenge assumptions, change attitudes and ultimately improve our decisions, in often unexpected ways.

This report provides an account of what creative practice has brought and can bring to research. It aims to endorse existing practices and trigger new thinking in doing research related to landscapes and environments, and their associated ecologies and management, by revealing the ways in which artists can operate as researchers, either independently or as part of multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary teams. It also addresses issues of the relationships between artist and non-artist researchers and offers positive suggestions about what arts research can bring to inter- and trans-disciplinary research contexts.

Ideas presented in the report have been informed by exchanges between academics and professionals, from the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, as well representatives from policy and practice interested in the contribution of the arts in landscape, environmental, and valuing nature research agendas. Insights have been instigated by discussions that took place during the AALERT (Arts and Artists in Landscape and Environmental Research Today) workshop held at the National Gallery, London in February 2018 and funded jointly by Valuing Nature and the Landscape Research Group.

Read the full report here.

The post Valuing Arts and Arts Research appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Arts Conference 2019: Report and more now available

The 2019 Green Arts Conference took place on the 8th of October and was attended by around 150 delegates, primarily from Scotland’s cultural institutions. This instalment of the conference focused on how arts and culture should respond to a state of climate emergency, how we can engage with issues of climate justice, and how we should adapt to climate change impacts.


Green Arts Conference 2019: Report and more now availableThe conference report for the 2019 Green Arts Conference is now available to download from our website. The report summarises the content from all of the day’s sessions and provides links to any resources that were mentioned by speakers. It is useful both for delegates to refresh their memories from as well as for those who were not able to attend.

We are also making available two films from the day. The first is of Simon Gall’s opening plenary, ‘Art for Art’s Sake is the Philosophy of the Well-Fed: Creativity in Our Times, which is available on our Vimeo page. The second is a summary video of the session Carbon Management in the Cultural Sector: Going to Plan?,which is available on our website alongside further documentation of the workshop.

PDF copies of some of the presentations used during the conference are available here and images of notes taken as part of certain sessions are also available on request by emailing info@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Many thanks to all our delegates, speakers, and stallholders for making the 2019 conference a great success. The 2020 instalment of the conference will be a bumper edition, linking up with the Cultural Adaptations project, taking place in October in Glasgow. We look forward to seeing you there!

The post Green Arts Conference 2019: Report and more now available appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Public Art Commission for Tillydrone Gateway, Aberdeen

To install an inspirational, contemporary roadside artwork/sculpture as a Gateway Feature.

This commission is for a public artwork to:

  • Convey a sense of place and reflect the history, heritage and aspirations of the community
  • Promote the area and encourage walking and cycling
  • Show drivers that they are entering a residential community

Gateway Feature brief:
A sculptural, eye-catching, bold and contemporary piece of artwork that reflects elements of the history, heritage and aspirations of the community, informed by members of the community, young and old, and conveying a sense of place and pride in the community. This will be a standalone unmistakable statement which reflects the urban environment and the unique natural landscape and wildlife of the area around the River Don.

We envisage a large piece, in single or multiple parts, that can be seen from the road as well as viewed at a closer distance. As a guide this is likely to be approximately 3-6m high, and of robust and sound material that will incur no/minimal maintenance costs, can withstand the weather and be relatively vandal proof, possibly metal such as iron but other media would be considered.

For phase 1 of the commission we will select up to four artists/creative teams to develop proposals (including a maquette), which should be informed by the community; people, heritage, history, and natural environment.

The fee for phase 1 is £1000, to include travel and accommodation costs, and material costs for maquettes. Additional funding will be available for consultation costs and materials.

The selected artist/creative team will be expected to:

  • Undertake a minimum of two public engagement workshops with the local community
  • Prepare a visual representation of the proposed design, including a maquette
  • Prepare a construction and installation plan
  • Provide a full project budget including manufacture and installation
  • Articulate ideas and discuss proposals with members of the public and the steering group.

Following consultation and selection by a panel of residents and partners the favoured option will be submitted as a planning application and funding sought to complete phase 2.

The successful artist/creative team will be contracted to develop and refine their proposal and complete the manufacture and installation of the artwork.

The fee for phase 2 of the commission will be £30,000-£50,000 to include all costs.
Timescales will be confirmed in agreement with the artist and the project team.

For a full copy of the brief and details of how to apply, please contact Jane Fullerton via tillydronegateway@hotmail.com

CLOSING DATE: 25th November 2019

The post Opportunity: Public Art Commission for Tillydrone Gateway, Aberdeen appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity/Open Call: “Four (plus one) Elements”

“ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ” is a multidimensional cultural organisation located in Tinos (Greece) offering a unique opportunity to apply for four 15-day cultural residencies in 2020.

After four years of continuous presence on the island of Tinos (Greece), “ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ” Tinos Art Gathering” invites applications from all disciplines in the arts and sciences to the Thematic Series of “Four (plus one) elements”, which will be implemented through four distinct 15-day residency programs until the fall of 2020 on the island of Tinos.

The “Four (plus one) Elements” project is supported by the Greek Ministry of Culture, the NEON organisation and in collaboration with the Athens School of Fine Arts, it will accommodate up to 200 guests of all disciplines in the arts and sciences, and it will be implemented through four distinct 15-day residency programmes (fire, water, air, earth) until the fall of 2020 on a set of more than 60 indoor and outdoor locations of great importance all around the island of Tinos.

With reference to the diverse cultural and natural landscape of Tinos, “ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ”, with the “Four (plus one) Elements” thematic series, borrows the four natural elements (earth, water, air, fire) plus one, the element of time, to highlight both the seasons alternation and the era of human intervention on the natural landscape. The “Four (plus one) Elements” thematic series, is a lengthy, multidimensional project, which attempts to explore and reinvent the relationships between the material “environments” of the island both used and unused, the various manifestations of locality, the participants as individuals and the contemporary interdisciplinary practice in visual arts, music, theatre, dance, research and the humanities and new means of expression through place and time.

Four Open Calls will be made, one for each element with four distinct deadlines:

  • Fire – 15 November 2019
  • Water – 15 February 2020
  • Air – 15 June 2020
  • Earth – 15 August 2020

Each residency is 15 days. Fire: 18-31 January 2020, Water :18-30 April 2020, Air :18-31 August 2020, Earth :18-31 October 2020. “ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ”, will select up to 50 participantsper element.

The works that are created by the residencies of each element will be presented respectively in the months: January, April, August, October 2020 throughout the totality of the natural and cultural landscape of the island. Priority will be given to collaboration between participants and/or the involvement of local organisations and communities.

The call is open to all with no age limit or restriction in art or science discipline.

Participants are offered:

  • free transport for a limited number of participants (in and out of the EU)
  • free transport to the island of Tinos and all residency sites
  • free accommodation (rooms and hostels)
  • free subsistence (common lunches-dinners, food supplies)
  • partial production and material costs

More information on the “Four(plus one) Elements” and how to apply you can find here (English version).

About ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ

“ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ” is a multidimensional cultural organisation located in Tinos, Greece since 2016, organising site-specific art exhibitions, open workshops, music and theatre performances, research projects, interactive tours in the natural environment of the island as well as in specific buildings of historical or architectural significance. “ΚΟΙΝΩΝΩ”’s objectives are: to intensify the inter-connectivity and mobilisation of participants from diversified geographical locations, the assimilation of the material environment as a vital part of the creative process and an essential element of sustainability, the emergence of particular elements of tradition and locality as a matter of public interest, the dissemination of knowledge and the acquisition of skills for a variety of disciplines, the exchange of ideas and the reinvention of collaboration in coordination with the various manifestations of culture and locality (tradition, environment, community) and the expansion and diversification of audiences.

The post Opportunity / Open Call: “Four (plus one) Elements” appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Guest Blog: Developing a Carbon Neutral Fringe Show

Pigfoot Theatre was the winning company in our 2019 Sustainable Fringe Awards. In this guest blog, Bea Udale-Smith (director and performer) and Conky Kampfner (writer and dramaturg) explain the ongoing development and evolution of their production.

A few weeks ago, I read an interview with a writer of a show about climate change (I’ve been trying to track the article down ever since – but I can’t find it!). In it, the writer suggested that all art is now climate art. The idea has stuck with me. At this Edinburgh Festival Fringe , the amount of specifically climate-focused shows is greater than ever before. And even shows which don’t explicitly reference climate breakdown are being made in the consciousness of the climate emergency. The article’s point which at first seemed far fetched is becoming more and more real to me.

This developing consciousness can sometimes feel paralysing. Up until the last couple of years, climate theatre had largely been defined by work like Katie Mitchell & Duncan Macmillan’s 2071, which turned climate scientist Chris Rapley into a performer, delivering a scientific lecture which left its audience with one emotion: mass panic. Relaying facts and conveying the grim reality of the climate crisis is crucial. But maybe there’s another emotion which is more important right now: hope.

We decided the show needed to be carbon neutral long before we knew what it was going to be about. Our lighting is powered by a bicycle, which we cycle live on stage, and by solar-powered lights which we operate while performing the show. Our sound is created live, by our voices, a piano, and objects we’ve found along the way – old tins are megaphones, a broken snare-drum is the sound of a train hitting the tracks, and so on! Finally, all of our production materials – our set, props, costumes – are made from re-purposed materials, built from objects we’d otherwise be throwing away.

It’s taken us almost a year to figure out what the show’s about. Renewable energy, protests, peat bogs, having hope in the face of rising eco-anxiety. We also had to confront (in our personal lives as well as our practice) the urge to hide behind our smaller actions. Using Keepcups, mooncups, tote bags, are all things which are worth doing, but are so often applied as band aids on an open and growing wound. What are the things staring us in the face like the need to divest pensions, like the fact that Shell is only putting 5% of it’s budget into renewable energy?

The most enjoyable side of taking almost a year to figure out what we were trying to do is how much has changed in just 12 months. Greta Thunberg sat outside the Swedish parliament last August. School strikes began internationally in November, and hit the UK by December. By February, an estimated 15,000 British school children were striking for the climate. Extinction Rebellion officially publicly assembled for the first time on 31stOctober – the day we finalised the first version of our script. 18 days later, 6000 people blocked five main London bridges. By the time we were performing the play for the second time in April, they’d protested naked in the House of Commons, and shut down traffic on Oxford Circus. And now, a year has gone by, and we’ve experienced the hottest temperatures recorded in UK history.

Removing the option to use pretty much every conventional piece of tech, which we previously would not have thought twice about using, has definitely been a challenge. For the Fringe, we’ve re-developed the play and added a lot of music, which we sing (or sometimes hum!), accompanied by our unfazeable composer, Sarah Spencer, on piano. But for most scenes, one of us is also on the bicycle, so we’ve had to get used to singing while cycling. In an early song, all three of us have to jump on and off the bike – we’re all singing at different points, two of us have a dance-break in the middle… We end up quite out of breath, but I actually think that’s great. It’s amazing how quickly you get used to seeing someone cycling while also acting – after a while, you forget they’re even doing something unusual! So some of my favourite moments in the play come when you suddenly remember that one of the actors has actually been cycling non-stop for the last 15 minutes.

The other limitation of using a bike to power our lighting is that its lights only have two states (on or off!). But, luckily, these days solar lighting comes in pretty much every shape or size you might want, and – unlike our bike’s lights – we can move it around, and play with it while performing. For a scene which takes place in Blackpool, for example, we have to create the effect of the Blackpool Illuminations. We use solar-powered, multi-coloured lightbulbs, which are very sweet and simple, but definitely don’t do the Illuminations justice. But then again, I guess that’s the fun of theatre – your job is to create the idea of things. Being carbon-neutral has meant we’ve had to strip everything back – we need the audience, their imagination, and belief, to finish the picture.

This play has always been incredibly regional. The characters travel up the country, through London, Blackpool, Walney, Glasgow and up to Forsinard. What’s been incredible about performing it this time round is that the characters end up where we are – in Scotland. So when the characters end up at a protest in the middle George Square in Glasgow we’re hopefully conjuring up an image that is imaginable for a lot of people in the room.

After the Fringe, we’ll have to re-develop the show. Partly because we are always interested in understanding how different audiences respond to our theatre and adapting around that, but mainly because climate change is an issue which is always – well – changing. The most exciting part of making this show has been responding to developments in the world around us. Not just reports which fill us with fear, but to the news of reform, of protest, of uproar, and of hope.

The post Guest Blog: Developing a Carbon Neutral Fringe Show appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

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