Creative Carbon Scotland

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Tickets: The Green Arts Conference!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Tickets are now available for this year’s Green Arts Conference! Taking place on 1st November 2017 in Glasgow, it’s the conference for Scottish cultural organisations aiming to increase their environmental sustainability.

Hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland at Partick Burgh Hall in Glasgow, this full-day conference will consist of a mix of plenary session, best practice show-and-tell from the Green Arts Initiative community, a supplier showcase and focused workshops. Confirmed speakers include Creative Scotland, Puppet Animation Scotland, Dundee Rep, and Starcatchers (Scotland’s National Arts and Early Years organisation).

The whole day will focus on how and why the cultural sector is creatively approaching environmental sustainability, and where organisations can go next in their sustainability work, as well as what is on the government, funder and grassroots horizons.

Building on the success of 50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector (2015)and 51 Shades of Green: Action in the Arts (2016), this year’s conference will highlight and share the innovative steps the sector is taking to reducing its environmental impact, and challenge how the arts can contribute to a more sustainable Scotland.

Whether you’re a Green Arts Initiative member, a Regularly Funded Organisation working towards Creative Scotland’s ‘Environment’ Connecting Theme, an arts venue keen to find out what your peers are doing, an arts company who has been working on sustainability for years, or just coming to sustainability in the sector for the first time, there will be something for you!

Register for your ticket below, or on Eventbrite!


About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Ullapool Green Tease Reflections

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

A few weeks ago, we held for our first Ullapool Green Tease, run in collaboration with An Talla Solais as part of their summer exhibition ‘Murmur – artists reflect on climate change’, curated by Jonathan Baxter.

A group of around twenty of us gathered in the MacPhail Centre, the building which hosts the Ullapool’s high school and library, as well as providing spaces for theatre performances, conferences and meetings. Over seaweed biscuits and tea, we heard short presentations by Gemma (Creative Carbon Scotland), exhibiting artist Sarah Gittins, Lindy Young and Anna Reid from Deveron Projects and local resident, boat builder and teacher Topher Dawson and held a discussion about the links between creative practices, community resilience and climate change.

Culture & climate change

Following introductions, Gemma outlined Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT programme which seeks to explore how artistic practices can contribute towards the significant social transformation required to meet national and global carbon reduction targets and adapt to a changing climate.

We see the arts as playing a key role in this transformation in various ways, including through its ability to create and bring communities together, make the invisible causes and impacts of climate change visible, and by helping society to think in new ways about complex issues and imagine different futures.

Exploring complexity

Sarah Gittins shared with us reflections from her research residency in Ullapool which explored the nature of local livelihoods based upon working ‘on, in or with the sea’, out of which she developed a series of printed works titled ‘Sea Tangle’.

Established by the British Fisheries Society in 1788, Ullapool has long been an active fishing port, surviving numerous busts and booms in the herring industry and supporting both small and large-scale fishing operations. Much of its current fishing catch is transported by refrigerated lorries to fish markets in Southern Europe.

The drawings which emerged from Sarah’s conversations and encounters shone a light on the complex interaction between local fishing practices, the marine ecosystem and how it is being and will be impacted by climate change in the future. We were told the story of the increasing numbers of swimming octopus and squid found in Ullapool waters. A result of rising sea temperature levels and predator loss, this change in the marine ecosystem has had a knock-on effect for shellfish populations, impacting the livelihoods of those dependent on creel fishing.

The octopus became an important symbol in Sarah’s drawings, encompassing what local writer John MacIntyre described as the need to “learn to think in tangles” to address the complexity of the challenges posed by climate change.

Community resilience

From Deveron Projects and Topher, we learned about some different approaches to building community resilience. Anna and Lindy introduced the Deveron Projects’ ‘50/50 model’ which aims to bring together the organisation’s artistic endeavours with the needs and interests of the local community in Huntly, following the maxim of Patrick Geddes ‘think global, act local’. Their current project ‘The Town is the Garden’ is supporting 100 residents to take up food growing initiatives, through which they will explore the wider question of what a sustainable food culture for the town could look like.

Topher shifted our attention from food to energy. He shared his experiences of living off-grid on Scoraig, a settlement located on a peninsula south of Ullapool on Little Loch Broom, highlighting the different relationship Scoraig’s residents have with their energy, and one another, being acutely aware of how one’s individual behaviour fits into a wider whole. He argued for the role of aesthetics in helping to change perceptions of landscape and increasing society’s connection to how energy is produced and consumed.

Topher concluded by asking what would it take for local residents to find beauty and power in a wind turbine situated in full visibility on a hill overlooking Ullapool. The Land Art Generator Initiative, which has a project currently under development in Glasgow, was referenced as a project which seeks to build popular acceptance of clean energy by integrating art and interdisciplinary creative processes into the development of renewable energy generating public artworks.

In different ways, the presentations highlighted the role which artistic practices can play in making new connections between previously disconnected areas, offering a means by which to approach and represent problems from a systems perspective. This ability to think at a systemic level is vital if we are to ensure the prosperity of the natural ecosystems and human societies, now and in the future. This was highlighted in ecological artist Newton Harrison’s recent talk at Woodend Barn and is something Creative Carbon Scotland is exploring through our Embedded Artist Project.

Closing discussion

In group discussions, we reflected upon what sources of hope we drew upon to address climate change, by what means we felt able to take action locally and what role, if any, the arts and culture might play in building community resilience to climate change. Themes emerging included:

  • Finding hope and sources of inspiration in the strong social ties and connections within the local community;
  • Identifying care as a strong motivating factor in local responses to climate change, both for one another and for the non-human;
  • The arts providing a means of developing a language which articulates the social and cultural value of the natural environment;
  • Arts spaces such as An Talla Solais offering important spaces in which to dwell in challenging questions, open-up debates and take risks.

We concluded by collating a list of skills, resources and community qualities which could be put towards the further development of an arts and sustainability network in Ullapool and the wider region in the future.


All images are credited to Saule Zuk

Thanks to everyone who joined us for the event! Green Tease is an ongoing informal events programme which connects creative practices and environmental sustainability. Find out more about previous and upcoming events and how you can get involved in the Green Tease network here.



The post Ullapool Green Tease Reflections appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.




About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Carbon Reporting 2016-17 due 29th September

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Carbon Reporting is due on 29th September for all Regularly Funded Organisations, and Creative Carbon Scotland are here to help!

All Regularly Funded Organisations should now have received their Annual Statistical Survey for 2016-17 from Creative Scotland which should be completed and returned by 29th September 2017. As with previous years the survey contains an Environment worksheet which requests information on the emissions produced from your use of utilities, waste and travel. You can find a new video explaining how to complete this worksheet in the Carbon Reporting for RFOs section of the website.

What you need for reporting to Creative Scotland

You will need access to data on your usage of water, electricity, gas and other heating fuels as well as amounts of your landfill and recycled waste. Your emissions will be calculated automatically when you enter this data into the worksheet. In addition, you will need to access emissions data for your travel. We recommend using figures from the report page in your www.claimexpenses.com account. If you do not have your travel data recorded in claimexpenses you will need to calculate emissions from mileage figures using emissions factors for each mode of travel.

Please contact us if you need help to obtain data on emissions factors for travel.

Note: If you have completed this form for a previous year there have been some very minor changes.

Last year, over 50 organisations supplied actual recorded data for all appropriate categories. We hope that this year will see an even greater number of organisations supplying actual data but if this is not available we would encourage you to supply estimated data rather than no data.

Previous year’s reporting

You may be interested to know how we have used your data in the past? You can download our analysis of the data returned in the Environmental section of the Annual Statistical Survey for 2015-16 from our new pages.

Please get in touch with fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com / 0131 529 7909 if you have any questions or need help with completing the Environment section of the survey.

 



The post Carbon Reporting 2016-17 due 29th September appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Blog: Harry Giles – A provocation for the Edinburgh Fringe

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Poet Harry Giles presented the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award 2017 on Friday 25 August. Read his provocation to the audience, to the Awards, to the Edinburgh Fringe, below.

I’m going to start with a confession, which is that I haven’t seen a single Fringe show this year. I have a couple of excuses – I moved house this month, and I’ve had a job in Glasgow all this week. But truth be told I didn’t avoid moving in August when we were given the purchase date, and I actively organised to spend a third of the Fringe in Glasgow. Whoops.

August in Edinburgh is the month of break-ups and breakdowns. Every year at least one of my friends has a major life crisis and needs looking after – sometimes it’s me. It’s something in the air, or in the market. I’m an artist, and have a number of different roles in the arts, so in August the city is full of my friends from across the country – and the world – but I don’t usually get to see them until they start to crack. You can see it in the Facebook status updates and midnight texts: as the month proceeds more and more of us get more and more broken. Bits of us fall of, and we hope there’s enough of us to last to the end of the month. We hibernate and regenerate for most of September.

We all know that the Fringe is unsustainable, and increasingly folk are willing to say it. The physical and emotional unsustainability that’s clear to anyone working or living here in August – the atmosphere of constant activity, the expectation of constant work, the late nights, the unending obligations, the crowds, the noise, the failures, the debt – is a direct and systemic product of the economic, social and environmental unsustainability. Focus on that jargon for a moment and think about what it means: activity that cannot be sustained. It literally can’t keep going forever.

A little background on me before I keep going. My undergraduate degree was in that glorious oxymoron, Sustainable Development, the latest in a long line of self-contradictory political terms, like Free Market, Democratic Election, or Pursuit of Happiness. After a theatre masters, I worked as the Environment Officer across all the Edinburgh Festivals, including the Fringe. Now I’m an independent writer and performer, just about making a living from it, making work that focusses in one way or another on radical social change. It might seem a bit odd, given all those optimistic pursuits, that I’m now being so profoundly negative, but I’ll come back to that. First, I want to have a hard look at the problem.

First, the economic and social unsustainability. The Fringe is a festival of the rentier: artists struggle to make money, most pay to perform and many lose money; venue staff and volunteers frequently suffer highly exploitative and often illegal working conditions; a very few venues make money and that trickles up to the top; the only real profit is in owning a pub, or a hotel, or an AirBnB room – or a University. On top of that, the gravitational pull of the Fringe means there’s three months of the year where performing artists can’t really find paying work, and the huge August revenue hasn’t stopped year-round independent venues from closing year on year, with music in Edinburgh suffering the most. This is a completely unworkable economic, financial and cultural model: it cannot keep going.

Then, the environmental unsustainability. We’ve built the economy of a whole city on a system of international air travel that literally cannot be sustained: it’s just a question of whether the oil runs out or the planet floods first. The city is a blaze of light 24 hours a day – so many lights it doesn’t seem to matter whether they’re energy-saving lamps or not – for the month of the year with the most sun. A festival is always a heterotopia, a space of alterity where normal rules don’t apply, a space of excess and celebration and consumption – which is wonderful! – but a month-long conglomeration of festivals means a month where extraordinary levels of production and consumption are expected to be sustained and can’t be sustained. You can’t live that way for that long. It’s psychologically, spiritually, financially and environmentally exhausting: it drains you til there’s nothing left.

And just to dwell in the negativity for a bit longer: let’s admit the extent of the crisis. We know we’re burning up. We’re shooting past emissions reductions targets. Forests are still being chopped down, rare earth metal and fossil fuel supplies are still being exhausted, sea levels are rising along with climate refugee numbers, coral is bleaching, ice is melting: every alarm bell is ringing and most of us, myself included, only make it through the day by stopping our ear s. I spent summers in my 20s camping in fields plotting how to shut down power stations and banks, and I’ve stopped doing that not because I don’t believe in it but because I’m struggling to see how those actions can halt a crisis of this scale, and ignoring the problem seems more liveable than engaging it.

So why my work, and why this Award? If everything’s so bad, why am I supporting engaging with it? If the Fringe is so bad, why celebrate it?

The truth is, I’m not remotely interested in labelling things as bad. I think that social movements – and the environmental movement in particular – is overly invested in a destructively puritan ethics of individual guilt and culpability, in prescribing and proscribing actions that will clean up your personal moral slate so you can feel better about yourself. The boycott has moved from being an insurgent tactic of economic transformation to an individual decision about what product choices best reflect your self-identity. The dominant message the environmental movement has succeeded in getting across is not “Oil companies and banks and airlines are literally destroying the earth, let’s rise together to get rid of them” but rather “Change your lightbulbs and separate your rubbish or you’re a bad person”. (I haven’t done the maths, but I’d bet at least a tenner that if everyone household in the world switched to energy-saving lightbulbs we still wouldn’t stay below a two degree temperature rise.) So I have no interest in condemning artists and audiences who participate in the Fringe, or indeed Fringe Festival Society staff, many of whom I know well and have worked with, many of whom see exactly the same problems and feel the same level of powerlessness in fixing it. (Landlords, on the other hand…) I’ve avoided the Fringe this year because I’m tired, not because I think it’s bad.

In fact, trying to do sustainable practice at the Fringe is emblematic of trying to sustain life on this planet: it’s a struggle against huge economic and political forces it seems impossible to influence, it’s a struggle participating in which makes you feel dirty and compromised and often hopeless, and it’s also the only choice we have, because there isn’t another planet. It is worth participating in this struggle. There is no outside. There is no escape. There is no being pure. There is only working with the conditions you’ve got now, trying to make something better. The challenge of sustainability in any context is not how to make yourself the most pure, the most blessed by the green beard in the sky, the most enthusiastic about telling people how to change lightbulbs, but how to stick a spanner in the works of a death machine without getting crushed yourself.

So what’s the kind of art that I’m looking for? I’m looking for art that stares directly at the problem, even with the risk of irreperable eye damage, and speaks a truth about it that people don’t want to hear and can’t help but hear. I’m looking for art that doesn’t just advocate for change, but is an act of change: a transitional demand that changes society in its demanding. I’m looking for art that doesn’t think it’s any better than the rest of us, but somehow makes us all better through its making. I’m looking for art that’s willing to get dirty. I’m looking for art that understands and admits to its present conditions, and creates a space to change them. I prefer peasants and labourers to prophets and messiahs: I’m looking for art with decent working conditions, that knows what work is, that’s working with us. I’m looking for art that shows us the other world which is not possible but actual, now. I’m looking for art that is a howl of pain and rage loud enough to clear a space for something else to happen.

Before announcing the award, and congratulating the people who’ve risen that challenge, I’m going to finish with a poem. I’m already feeling that these words are clumsy and don’t quite say what I wanted them to say. Prose is too literal, too easily excerpted and quoted and misquoted, at least the way I write it. This poem is a story I wrote for my friend, the theate critic Maddy Costa, and it’s about everything I’ve just been talking about.

THE LONGING FOR ONE THING INSIDE OF ANOTHER

There was a world where tokens were exchanged

for food, and when a token met your hand

a spur extended blandly into your palm

to take a sip of blood. This payment kept

the tokens bright enough to check your hair in,

cool enough to glide from purse to purse.

 

And in this world there were two friends who made

assemblages of wood and steel: stairways,

sunshades, simple things to see through, things

to pause on, things to touch. They worked apart,

and then from time to time they met to look

and say, “This works”, and say, “This doesn’t work.”

 

One day one friend came with a gift, a question.

They bought some time discussing techniques, and then

they said, “I heard your purse was light. I saw

your building shed was empty and your tools

were sore for oil.” And they held out their hand

with sixteen hungry tokens free to take.

 

Now, both these friends were just the kind of folk

to argue far too hard about the way

things are on other worlds, or could be, or were,

and how to cross between them without snapping

painful laws of space and time. At times,

they held that wood and steel could build a bridge

 

to where a body could eat without blood.

And so they laughed as they watched the sixteen tokens

pass from palm to palm and felt the prick

and wiped the reddish smears on the handkerchiefs

that all folk carry tucked in their back pocket,

the depth of dye declaring the force of the flag.



The post Blog: Harry Giles – A provocation for the Edinburgh Fringe appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Art and Ecology Publication Submissions Open Call

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

A&E is a new collective focussing on critical art and ecology matters founded by Glasgow School of Art graduates. We are launching with a publication under the theme ‘Disconnection’. This could be explored through various sub-themes such as anthropocentrism and a disconnection to the non-human, the effects of capitalism, escapism, utopia, denial, etc.

This is an open call for all kinds of submissions coming from any creative practice or background. Submissions may include but are not limited to critical writing, poetry, sound, image, photography, drawing, documentary work…

We are ideally looking for new work made for the publication, however we may accept previous work if it relates to the theme and has not been previously exhibited or published.

Applicants should not limit themselves to print mediums. There will be an event to launch the publication that may include performances of all kinds as well as an accompanying exhibition.

Find out More:

If you wish to submit or discuss a proposal for the publication or launch event please feel free to contact us.

For further information, please contact info.aecollective@gmail.com

The deadline is Sunday 15 October 2017 at 23:55.

 



The post Opportunity: Art and Ecology Publication Submissions Open Call appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

July 2017 Green Tease Reflections

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Edge Effects: Frontiers in Retreat was a Green Tease held in Glasgow on 27th July led by the Scottish Sculpture Workshop.

Edge Effects: Frontiers in Retreat was a Green Tease held in Glasgow on 27th July led by the Scottish Sculpture Workshop. The event was part of their Frontiers in Retreat: Edge Effects programme of walks, workshops, film and performance which explored the complex co-dependencies between ecological, social, economic and political phenomena.

Frontiers in Retreat is a 5 year collaborative project, enquiring the intersections of art and ecology. Within the project there were 7 core sites across Europe these are Mustarinda (Finland), Scottish Sculpture Workshop – SSW (Scotland), Cultural Front GRAD (Serbia), Centre d’Art i Natura CAN (Catalonia), HIAP – Helsinki International Artist Programme (Finland), Skaftfell – Center for Visual Art (Iceland), Interdisciplinary Art Group SERDE (Latvia). These locations are where artists were invited to work and share knowledge, often collaborating with local inhabitants and communities. The aim of the local residencies was to provide a complex understanding of the entanglements between local ecological concerns and the larger, systematic, global processes.

The Green Tease started with a talk from Taru Elfving who developed the concept of the project. Taru provided an in depth explanation of the project and posed the questions ‘are humans embedded in the ecosystems or are they added on?’ and ‘what does it mean to be centred?’. Taru took the audience through the experiences which shaped the project, for instance how climate change is changing the experiences of the living. This was then linked back to the engagement between art and the environment, leading to frontiers in retreat and giving a platform for artistic research which gave an insight into change in other environments.

Artist Carl Giffney gave an overview of his documentary as part of Frontiers in Retreat. The feature length documentary was filmed in the Netherlands, Scotland and Finland. The film I really don’t feel them shows the making of a unique pair of Dutch bronze clogs that are forged in Scotland as the Independence referendum was taking place. The shoes were brought on a trip the length of Finland and travelled North to the Saami people, the only indigenous people in Europe, living in Northern Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia. Carl then finished by linking the project to social cohesion and his personal experiences of making yourself vulnerable in order to learn.

The day was ended with a deep listening exercise and understanding with sonic artist and researcher Ximena Alarcon. Ximena first gave an insight into her project, Fertile Soil, which she described as migrant women listening to their migrations and using technology to communicate with sounds, words and silences. This project gave an artistic platform to allow improvised conversations between migrant women to take place. The practice of deep listening helps people to recognise the territories we inhibit and how these connect with our inner self, transcending identities and the sense of belonging to a specific ‘place’. Ximena then moved on to hold a short interactive deep listening exercise with the Green Tease participants and took them through the various steps of the exercise to allow them to connect with themselves and others.

The event ended with a discussion in regards to culture / SHIFT questions, the research framework developed by Creative Carbon Scotland in order to understand the ways in which artists work.

Thanks to Yvonne Bullimore of Scottish Sculpture Workshop and Green Arts Initiative member the CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts for hosting the event.

 



The post July 2017 Green Tease Reflections appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Cultural Adaptations

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Carbon Scotland is looking for arts organisations interested in partnering with us in an EU-funded project – read more about the project here.

Because the project focuses on adaptation to climate change, we are looking for partners based in Eire, Belgium, Denmark, north-west Germany or the Netherlands, as these regions have similar climate change challenges.

Are you, or do you know of …

  • A fully constituted organisation that has been active in the arts, cultural and creative sector for at least two years?
  • Based in Eire, Belgium, Denmark, north-west Germany or the Netherlands?
  • Interested in working together on pioneering approaches to learning and skills development for cultural practitioners and organisations so they can reduce their business costs?
  • Keen to bring flair and imagination to opening up new business markets in non-arts environments for arts practitioners?
  • Intrigued by the concept that artists have a unique contribution to make towards helping society adapt to a climate changed world?

Partners don’t need to know much about Adaptation yet, but will need to find a local partner who is working on it (such as the city or regional government or Adaptation agency) to work with.

If you are based in Scotland, please tell your arts and cultural contacts in our target countries about this opportunity and ask them to disseminate it themselves and to get in touch with us if they’d like to know more.


Ben Twist / ben.twist@creativecarbonscotland.com

Alexis Woolley / alexis.woolley@creativecarbonscotland.com

Tel : +44(0)131 529 7909 / +44(0)7931 553872



The post Opportunity: Cultural Adaptations – Creative Europe Partnersearch appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Making economics the servant, not the master

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

“An advanced city is not one where even the poor use cars, but rather one where the rich use public transport,” Enrique Peñalosa, former Mayor of Bogota.

I’ve been reading the new edition of Tim Jackson’s Prosperity Without Growth. I read the first edition some years ago and this terrific, substantially rewritten version seems much clearer and easier to understand. This is partly because Jackson has perfected his arguments by rehearsing them so many times since then, and maybe I know more now about what he’s talking about.

I think however it’s also the way the financial crisis, politics and the approach to climate change have played out in the years since 2009, when the report that became the book was first released. The standard economic responses to environmental and financial crises have not succeeded and inequality and political unrest are rife. So maybe the book just seems more obvious. As Jackson points out in the prologue, what he writes about isn’t now just a fringe issue but an essential, almost mainstream discussion.

What is prosperity?

Jackson sets out the problems of growth and then seeks to redefine prosperity, using work that shows that beyond a certain point more income doesn’t increase happiness. Reducing poverty is crucial, but once you get to the level of the poorer countries in Europe, the gains from increased wealth are marginal (although being better off than your peers seems to matter). And he argues, along  with a long list of philosophers, writers and economists over the ages, that prosperity actually resides in such things as:

  • Physical and mental health
  • Entitlement to democratic and educational participation
  • Trust, security and a sense of community
  • Relationships
  • Meaningful employment and participation in society

The Problem of (no) Growth

Where I came unstuck is where Jackson tries to explain why, contrary to received economic opinion, a no- or slow-growth society won’t lead to a depression, mass unemployment and the accompanying social discord. His answer is that an economy that focuses on health, education, community and so on will be a services-based economy rather than a manufacturing/production-based one. This has a lower potential for productivity gains through technology and innovation: you can’t increase efficiency in an orchestra, a hairdresser’s or a nursing home, which rely on human engagement, as you can in a widget factory. So the slower growth will not reduce jobs as much, and the shift won’t be as bad as we think. This seems fair enough, but we’re still going to need food and various kinds of stuff in this brave new world: concert halls, scissors and beds, if nothing else. Can you have an economy solely based on services? Maybe I’m missing something…

However, it’s a great book and Jackson seems to me to recognise and state the key point, that the future society we need to build is going to be different to the current one. Continuing the way things are will lead to similar problems of overstepping the Stockholm Resilience Centre’s planetary boundaries. That this is seldom remarked upon baffles me. And an example came up again in a way in the UK Government’s recent announcement that they would ban new internal combustion engine cars from 2040.

Imagining a different world

Instead of changing what makes the cars run, we should be thinking about whether, where and when we need cars. They take a great deal of energy and carbon to produce; they cause other forms of pollution; they waste lots of valuable space in cities and towns; driving wastes time and causes stress; they cause health problems through accidents and lack of exercise. Of course they are advantageous for some people and some of the time: to move stuff around, to enable people with mobility problems to participate fully in society. But there’s an opportunity to rethink a whole series of things: how we plan our environment; where we put homes, workplaces, hospitals, shops and other facilities; how we plan public transport networks; when we work; and so on.

There’s an assumption that people want to travel by car. But backing up Jackson’s work, for my PhD research in Aberdeen I’ve analysed over 3,000 responses to surveys and held six focus groups, and I’m not so sure. People did travel to the theatre by car but were annoyed about parking – finding spaces and the costs – and they wanted to enjoy a drink during the interval. However the problems with public transport and elements of the urban environment being off-putting, particularly to women, made the car the obvious choice. Not because it was good, but because the alternatives were worse.

Even the technological answer of autonomous cars assumes a need for easy and largely private motorised mobility. Walking, cycling, public transport don’t get much of a look in but are arguably better for public and private health, both mental and physical. Perhaps because they don’t feed the economy: more walking doesn’t lead to increased GDP.

It’s not just the economy, stupid.

What Jackson seeks to do in Prosperity Without Growth is set out the economics of a post-growth society. And that’s hard because, as he points out, contemporary (although not all) economics assumes growth to be essential to the success of a modern society. But the sociologist John Urry argued that economics has had a stranglehold on thinking about climate change for too long and that other disciplines should join in. This is surely where the arts and culture feature: we need to imagine our new society, and then economics is useful to understand how to make it work. But imagining the unimaginable needs to come first, and that’s what artists do. (Interestingly, Jackson is a playwright as well as an economist – perhaps this is a job for him?)

We’re currently planning our 2018 Arts+Sustainability Residency which will take place in Aberdeen and be focused on the post-fossil fuel future for that city-region. We’ll bring an energy expert and a cultural producer together to help eight artists explore how that future might be shaped. We won’t solve the problem, but we may sow the seeds for future imagining that will make the job easier in future.

 



The post Ben’s Strategy blog: Making economics the servant, not the master appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland :

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Shortlist: Sustainable Practice Award!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are delighted to announce the shortlist for the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award 2017: the award for sustainability at the world’s largest arts festival.

The award is a collaboration between Scotland-based Creative Carbon Scotland and the North American-based Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts. Each year it is given to a production that exhibits high quality artistic integrity and engages its audience and company in the topic of sustainability. It celebrates different approaches to sustainable practice, both in content and in the physical production of shows, and rewards those that take responsibility for their environmental impact and think creatively about how the arts can help grow a sustainable world.

This year the number and quality of applications was exceptionally high. Productions completed a comprehensive application toolkit, which challenged them on many approaches and angles on sustainability, as well as offering guidance and advice to productions still developing their practice.

Open to any of the 3,398 shows performing at this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe, applicants where whittled down to a shortlist of only 18 shows. Those shortlisted are as follows (in alphabetical order):

  • A Great Fear of Shallow Living by In Tandem Theatre Company at Zoo Southside
  • Changelings by Pucqui Collaborative at theSpace on North Bridge
  • Dreaming Amidst Thorns by Kaleidoscope Theatre at Quaker Meeting House
  • Form by Rendered Retina at Pleasance Dome
  • Home Sweet Garden by Asylon Theatre at Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh – John Hope Gateway
  • I Am A Tree by Jamie Wood at Assembly George Square Theatre
  • Last Resort by 2 Magpies Theatre at Summerhall
  • Letters From Earth by NewGround Theatre Dance Company at Greenside @ Infirmary Street
  • Me and My Bee by This Egg and the Pleasance at Pleasance Courtyard
  • Plan B for Utopia by Joan Clevillé Dance at the Pleasance Courtyard
  • Programmed by Justin Lavash at C Primo
  • The Hero Who Overslept by Bravebeard Productions and Fringe Management at Gilded Balloon at the Rose Theatre.
  • The Pit Ponies’ Penultimate Life Drawing Class by UndrGround Bird / Rupert Smith at Paradise in the Vault
  • The Time Machine by Dyad Productions at Assembly Roxy
  • Towers of Eden by Outland Theatre at theSpace on the Mile
  • Tribe by Temper Theatre at Zoo Southside
  • Van Gogh Find Yourself #VGFY by Walter DeForest / PBH’s Free Fringe at Natural Food Kafe
  • Whales by Binge Culture at Assembly George Square Theatre

Ben Twist, Director of Creative Carbon Scotland, said:

“It’s exciting to see such a range of approaches to sustainability demonstrated by companies coming to the Fringe. The quality gets higher each year and the depth of commitment and understanding is greater, both in the way people produce their shows and the content of them. I’m very pleased that CCS is able to join our colleagues at the CSPA and the List to highlight this hard work by so many companies.”

Ian Garrett, Director of the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, said:

“In addition to watching the award grow and the ever-increasing quality of the shows which are submitted, we’re grateful to all applicants for providing key information to understanding sustainable trends and areas of future improvement across the festival. With the many initiatives growing across the fringe, it’s heartening to share that not only are we seeing more and more conscientious work, but everyone involved is have a real and visible impact on this massive arts marketplace.”

Each shortlisted show will be reviewed by a selected international judging panel, before the final winner is announced on 25 August 2017 at a ceremony hosted at Scotland’s national home of poetry: The Scottish Poetry Library. An organisation itself extremely committed to environmental sustainability, and a member of the Green Arts Initiative, the venue will play host to a performance by poet Harry Giles, and the winner will receive a unique (and sustainable) award piece, crafted by local maker, Chris Wallace.


The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice award is run by Creative Carbon Scotland and the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, together with their sponsors PR Print and Design, and with media partnership from The List magazine. For further information please contact Alana.laidlaw@creativecarbonscotland.com

 



The post Shortlist Announced for 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Volunteers: Free Energy and Carbon Audit

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This Energy and Carbon Audit programme is provided free to selected organisations in the Glasgow and Edinburgh areas by a partnership between the Carbon Trust, University of Strathclyde and University of Edinburgh.

The audit will help your organisation understand and reduce energy and other costs in your activities, providing a clear assessment of your organisation’s carbon footprint and a practical action plan to make savings and take positive steps towards environmental sustainability.

Postgraduate students from the respective universities are trained by the Carbon Trust to complete an audit at a site, as part of their studies towards a Masters degree in engineering, carbon management or other related discipline. They will be selected to work with your organisation, backed by the support and experience of the Carbon Trust. This is highly valuable practical experience, carried out to professional standards, benefitting the students’ development and helping to produce a much-needed future generation of skilled technical specialists in business sustainability.

The students will produce a professional-style report at no cost to you, quality assured by specialists at the Carbon Trust. The report will help you better understand the consumption, costs and any wastage of energy in your organisation, to identify and take action to reduce costs and carbon emissions and, ultimately, improve your organisation and increase profits. The student carbon auditors will:

  •   Calculate the carbon footprint of your organisation, using data from you energy bills and and elsewhere.
  •   Identify opportunities for reducing energy costs and carbon emissions at your organisation.
  •   Calculate the energy, cost and carbon savings of the identified opportunities.
  •   Estimate any investment and payback period related to each of the identified opportunities.
  •   Produce a practical action plan for you to implement the identified opportunities.

Please note, all the information you provide at any point – and the energy and carbon audit report itself – will be kept confidential. Only aggregated results for the whole programme may be reported (unless we seek and receive your written permission otherwise). If you have any questions before, during or after the visit, please contact Roddy Hamilton at the Carbon Trust, at the email address below.

To find out more and to confirm interest in participating in this free programme please send an email with your contact details and brief description of your organisation to: roddy.hamilton@carbontrust.com.



The post Call for Volunteers: Free Energy and Carbon Audit for Creative Carbon Scotland Members appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland