Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: The Sunny Art Prize 2019 – International Art Competition

The Sunny Art Prize is an international art prize hosted by Sunny Art Centre, London. This fine art competition in the UK is a global platform offering art opportunities to emerging and established artists to showcase their artworks internationally. The exhibiting galleries are located in cities across the world, including London, Beijing and Shanghai. The art contest will also give the art prize winners the opportunity to be part of a one-month artist residency. The Artist Residency Programme is organised in collaboration with established Chinese art institutions and it provides the chance to engage with historically and culturally rich places in China.

The art competition welcomes submissions from all over the world. The diversity of the prize is also reflected by the variety of art practices it represents, from two-dimensional work such as paintings, drawings and photography to three-dimensional sculptures and ceramics, as well as contemporary installations, mixed media artworks, video and digital work.
Sunny Art Prize 2019 Submissions Deadline: 30th June 2019

What Is Awarded?

First Prize

  • £3,000
  • A public solo exhibition in London
  • A group exhibition in London
  • A one-month residency in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
  • A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

Second Prize

  • £2,000
  • A group exhibition in London
  • A one-month residency in China, (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
  • A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

Third Prize

  • £1,000
  • A group exhibition in London
  • A one-month residency in China, (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
  • A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

The prize winners will be joined by 27 shortlisted artists in a group exhibition at the Sunny Art Centre, London. From these 27, 7 artists will be selected to exhibit their works at one of our partners’ galleries in China along with the three Prize winners.

Advantages

  • Exhibit your work globally in prestigious galleries from London to Shanghai
  • Win from a cash fund of £6,000 to expand your practice
  • Win the first prize and get an exclusive 1-month solo exhibition in the heart of London at the Sunny Art Gallery
  • Participate in a residency in Asia, and engage with historically and culturally rich places in China
  • Reach audiences worldwide by showcasing your work online to over 100,000 visitors.
  • Be included in the finely printed catalogues released internationally for each edition of the Prize

Who Can Submit?

Submissions are accepted from every country in the world and are all equally judged. Please note that you must be at least 18 years old to enter the competition.
Entries may include:

Accepted Media

  • Painting
  • Sculpture
  • Photography
  • Ceramic
  • Original Prints
  • Installation Art
  • Mixed Media (both wall-hung and three-dimensional)
  • Video Art (Including moving image, projected work, and digital installations)
  • Drawing

Size Restrictions

All 2D work such as painting, drawing, projected videos (including moving images and installation) must be 120x120cm in size max.
All three-dimensional work, including sculptures, ceramics, and mixed media artworks, must be 80x80x80cm max in size. Installation art (whether made of mixed media or digital) must be assembled on site at the exhibiting location and can reach 100x100x100cm max.

What Do We Look For?

We wish for artists to engage with real contemporary issues. Winners of previous editions did so by raising awareness of global issues and themes ranging from climate change, the current international debate regarding immigration and refugees to our perception of identity, gender, and much more.

For further details visit the website: https://www.sunnyartcentre.co.uk/artprize/

The post Opportunity: The Sunny Art Prize 2019 – International Art Competition appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Sector donates to support Creative Carbon Scotland’s work

Members of Scotland’s arts & cultural (and food) sector have been showing some creative ways of raising funds to support Creative Carbon Scotland’s work.

We’re delighted to have been the recipient of a number of donations – from artists to food vendors – to help support our work putting culture at the heart of making a better, environmentally sustainable Scotland. We’re thrilled to see the sector’s support for our work being expressed in a range of different ways, adding to the Regular Funding we receive from Creative Scotland and the in-kind support of the City of Edinburgh Council.

The Album (EP)

WracklinesWe are thrilled to be the beneficiary of the profits from sales of ‘Wrack Lines’, an EP created by Jo Mango in collaboration with Rachel SermanniRM HubbertLouis Abbott (Admiral Fallow) and The Pictish Trail. The name of the EP, released on Olive Grove Records, refers to the name given to the waving line of detritus that is left on the beach when the tide goes out. The EP grew out of the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded ‘Fields of Green’ research project, which explored what audiences, organisers and musicians can do to encourage environmentally sustainable behaviour around music festivals. The research was a collaboration between the University of the West of Scotland, Edinburgh University, Lancaster University and Creative Carbon Scotland.

Since its release with a special performance by Jo Mango and Pictish Trail at Celtic Connections in 2016, several songs from the EP have been played on BBC Radio 6 by Stuart Maconie, Gideon Coe and Guy Garvey. The EP is available to buy as a digital album or CD through Bandcamp, and lots of streaming services!

The Merch

The sale of canvas bags as part of the #SustainableFringe campaign led by Poltergeist Theatre at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2018, has been another welcome source of donations towards our work. The group from Poltergeist Theatre took on the #SustainableFringe idea and used it to encourage production companies, audiences and theatre makers to get involved in environmentally sustainable action focusing on three areas of visible waste at the Fringe: plastic, paper and material.

A new approach for the #SustainableFringe campaign will be brought to the Fringe this year by the newly launched Staging Change initiative which is creating a network of performers and theatre makers who believe in a greener future for theatre at the Fringe and beyond.

The Mag

We’ve gratefully received the royalties from Ade Adesina‘s contribution to the inaugural edition of ‘Mycelia’ a new print magazine published in Glasgow by Hedera Felix. Ade is a full-time printmaker who lives in Aberdeen whose work  is a visual commentary on the ideas of ecology and our ever-changing world. Mycelia is a new magazine dedicated to weird fiction, experimental literature and visual art that explore the weird and the eerie from Hedera Felix an independent publisher which begun launched in 2018. Mycelia 001 can be purchased through Hedera Felix’s website.

The Food

The – vegan with veggie-friendly offerings – street-food vendor Freddy & Hicks each month collects donations towards charitable causes from their customers and we were fortunate enough to be chosen in September. Freddy & Hicks started life at Borough Market in London before migrating to Glasgow. You can now find their exciting veggie and vegan burgers and more at the street food market at PLATFORM from Friday to Sunday every weekend as well as a whole lot of other pop-ups around Glasgow and beyond.

What’s next?

We are really thrilled to be the recipient of these pieces of support, it shows us that the work we’re doing is important for others and a diverse range of funding helps us to focus on helping the cultural transition to create a fairer, more equitable and zero-carbon society.

If there are ways you or your organisation would like help make this happen at any scale, we’d absolutely love to hear from you. Please drop Ben a line or call our office on 0131 529 7909.

The post Sector donates to support Creative Carbon Scotland’s work appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Good Energy partnership to help Scottish cultural sector ‘go green’

A new collaboration between Creative Carbon Scotland and Good Energy will support Scotland’s cultural sector to go green.

Match-funded by the Culture & Business Fund Scotland (CBFS) programme, Creative Carbon Scotland is pleased to announce a new partnership with 100% renewable electricity supplier Good Energy to develop knowledge, resources and green energy opportunities for the Scottish Green Arts community.

Transforming Scotland’s Cultural Sector

Creative Carbon Scotland has been working with the Scottish cultural sector since 2011 to reduce the environmental impact of the arts and to explore innovative approaches to enable Scotland’s cultural sector to bring about the transformational change needed to address climate changeIts Green Arts Initiative is a growing collaborative community of over 225 cultural organisations committed to environmental sustainability.  

The climate crisis is an urgent issue and cultural organisations are aware of how they can make a difference.  Through changing their energy consumption, cultural venues can dramatically reduce their overall greenhouse gas emissions. 

Creating New Knowledge for a Greener Cultural Sector

The new partnership with Good Energy follows recent groundbreaking work by Creative Carbon Scotland to help arts and cultural organisations reduce their energy demand through improved energy efficiency and buildings management and positive behaviour change. Matched pound-for-pound by the Culture & Business Fund Scotland, Good Energy’s partnership will enable the design and creation of skills workshops and new online resources for the sector to empower and support Green Champions working across theatre, dance, music, literature, visual arts, screen, and the creative industries, helping to upskill the Scottish cultural sector to tackle the climate crisis 

The Culture & Business Fund Scotland programme is funded by the Scottish Government via Creative Scotland. Managed by independent charity Arts & Business Scotland, it seeks to encourage closer collaboration between business and the cultural sector by match funding business sponsorship of cultural projects throughout Scotland.   

Commenting on the partnership, Helen Franks, Partnerships & Business Development Manager at Good Energy said: This exciting new partnership with Creative Carbon Scotland will build on our successful track record in the arts sector. We look forward to working with Scotland’s thriving cultural community as it makes the transition to sustainable, clean energy.” 

Ben Twist, Director and Founder, Creative Carbon Scotland, said: “Ethically-sourced renewable energy is one of the best ways through which our sector and wider society can shape a cleaner, greener future. With match-funding from the Culture & Business Fund Scotland, our partnership with Good Energy aims to build up knowledge and awareness to help those working in the cultural sector to make more sustainable energy choices.”

Carl Watt, Head of Programmes at Arts & Business Scotland, said: “Via match-funding from the Culture & Business Fund Scotland, we’re delighted to be supporting Creative Carbon Scotland’s partnership with Good Energy. Like all sectors of the economy, the cultural sector needs to be doing what it can to help reduce Scotland’s carbon footprint. With that in mind, this partnership aims to share the knowledge cultural organisations throughout Scotland need to make more informed decisions about their energy use and supply.”

Upcoming Workshops and Green Energy Questionnaire and Prize Draw for Scottish Cultural Organisations

To celebrate and shape this new partnership for a greener cultural sector, we are hosting a questionnaire for all Scottish cultural organisations on their choices around energy, with the opportunity to win a £100 voucher for John Lewis & Partners (online and instore)!

We’ll be using the insights gained from this questionnaire to inform the content of two free workshops we’ll be hosting in mid-June:

The post Good Energy partnership to help Scottish cultural sector ‘go green’ appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenTease Podcast: Can experiencing fiction and the unfamiliar help to change the way humans act and relate to the climate crisis?

Our second podcast looks at how ‘Climate Fiction’ or ‘Cli-Fi’ can help us to experience and connect with the climate crisis in new ways.

The latest episode “Can experiencing fiction and the unfamiliar help to change the way humans act and relate to the climate crisis?” comes from our Green Tease ‘Cli-Fi: The New Weird’. It’s available on Itunes, Google Podcasts (on your phone), Spotify and a bunch of other platforms. We welcome your feedback on the podcast as we’re aiming to produce recordings of more of our events, to allow a wider audience to benefit from the information and to ensure that there’s a means of participating when environmental or other considerations mean people choose not to travel.

This event was the A+E’s Collective’s eclectic and thought provoking response to the Green Tease Open Call, in collaboration with UNFIX Festival. The festival audience were taken to space and the far flung corners of their imaginations, through a multimedia exploration of the genre Cl-Fi (Climate Fiction) – as a way to rethink how we engage with the climate crisis.

Cli-Fi: The New Weird

A+E have provided an overview of what the session covered, and what can heard in the podcast:

Titled Cli-Fi: The New Weird, our special edition of BIOSYSTEMS aimed to explore the problems, pleasures and potentials of using speculative genres to help understand our positioning as human subjects in the context of the climate crisis. We began the two-hour session in Glasgow’s CCA with an exclusive screening of our film, From Mull to Mars, developed in collaboration with local filmmaker Winnie Brook Young. Drawing on new materialist philosophies and the eerie aesthetics of novels like Jeff Vandermeer’s Annihilation, From Mull to Mars challenges what ‘presence’ means in the context of an unknown world within our world, which we are calling the Zone, after Tarkovsky’s Stalker.

After the film, Dr Rhys Williams from the University of Glasgow gave a presentation on the history of Cli-Fi (climate change fiction) and the New Weird and the challenges these genres pose to familiar understandings of ‘nature’. Glasgow-based science-fiction novelist/poet Oliver Langmead performed extracts from his recent publications and gave an overview of the environmental themes within them, including terraforming and posthumanism.

A+E member Maria Sledmere then joined Rhys and Ollie to deliver an original visualisation script, designed to help workshop participants ‘enter the Zone’. Following the meditation, participants were asked to respond with writing or drawing. Questions asked of the groups included ‘were you human or did you adopt a nonhuman form at any point in the Zone?’ and ‘What is the value of ‘slow’ forms of attention in the context of ecological crisis?’

Individual groups then fed back their discussion to the room with verbal, written and visual descriptions – touching on ecological ethics, emotional reactions, empathy and storytelling, the difference between reality and fiction, dreams and film. We are collating some of these responses and intend to create a publication, as a companion to the film.

You can find out more about A+E Collective here: www.instagram.com/a.e.collective

The post #GreenTease Podcast: Can experiencing fiction and the unfamiliar help to change the way humans act and relate to the climate crisis? appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Ben’s Strategy Blog: What exactly is the Overton Window?

It has felt a funny couple of weeks here at Creative Carbon Scotland HQ. For the first time in our eight-year existence the climate crisis has been top of the agenda in the news: everyone’s been talking about Extinction Rebellion and the idea of the UK getting to zero-carbon by 2025. Meanwhile I’ve been stuck in the office.

Instead of gluing myself to North Bridge, I’ve been working on long-term, slow stuff: developing strategic relationships, planning training for later in the year, discussing projects about adaptation to flooding. I’ve found it a bit discombobulating: is Creative Carbon Scotland on the right track or should we be advocating direct (cultural?) action?

I think I have to hold my nerve. Addressing climate change is a long game as well as a fast one. We need all of the above, not the fast stuff or the slow and steady, but both.

The Overton Window

One reason for this was mentioned by Chris Stark, the Chief Executive of the UK Government’s Committee on Climate Change, in a good speech he gave back in March:

It is worth reflecting on how the public discourse has shifted to permit these moments. It feels very much that the ‘Overton Window’ has moved – and rapidly in recent months.’

Richard Dixon, Director at Friends of the Earth Scotland, mentioned the Overton Window the other week at an event I was at. I hadn’t heard the term before but my understanding (thanks Wikipedia, amongst others) is that it refers to the realities of policy making and politics. Policy options within the Overton Window are those that are considered within the bounds of legitimacy: those outwith it are options that just aren’t considered publicly acceptable. Chris Stark is suggesting that ideas and policies that would have been considered outlandish a couple of years ago are now in the realm of the possible.

So what exactly is this window everyone’s on about?

A note of caution here: Joseph P Overton, who invented the term, was a Senior Vice President of the Mackinac Center, which is a free-market think tank in the US. Such right-wing pressure groups have been very successful at applying the concept and deliberately shifting the window so that previously unthinkable policies (marketisation of the health service in the UK, privatising prisons in both the US and UK, Brexit etc) have become areas that are considered acceptable for discussion. It’s important that the climate crisis is not perceived as a left/right issue and perhaps it’s good to see a successful approach being applied to what in my view are more useful areas. But I do find myself a mite uncomfortable about adopting techniques associated with the Koch brothers.

Richard Dixon used the term to argue that Friends of the Earth Scotland welcomed the more radical Extinction Rebellion’s existence and demands, even if FoE didn’t necessarily espouse them. XR made what might have previously been considered FoE’s unreasonable views more mainstream, so when Richard is arguing for the Climate Change Bill to be more ambitious, politicians are more likely to listen.

Is it an age thing? I just had my 57th birthday!

I think I’m in the same camp – and I’m aware here that I have a history of working from within existing structures which are arguably the establishment, but trying to change things from the inside. As a Board member of the Scottish Arts Council I was certainly an insider, but succeeded I think in arguing for some different approaches. (I didn’t succeed with everyone: I was once told that I was the second most unpopular person in Scottish theatre – which was a bit of a worry since that was precisely where I was trying to earn a living.)

I’ve long been quite interested in change and, because at the Scottish Arts Council I was chairing the committee that distributed National Lottery funds, and there was a requirement that the funded activity was ‘additional’ (whatever that meant), we were always working with the future, rather than continuing the past, and that meant that we could explore new ideas, some of which became mainstream. I think something similar can be said for working on climate change and sustainability in the arts: because it’s a new topic and no-one’s particular responsibility, you aren’t dealing so much with existing stuff, you are constantly breaking new ground.

So although I find it a bit uncomfortable not to have joined the protesters, we can benefit from it while continuing to work in slower and steadier way. I’m currently planning some workshops for cultural organisations and the officers from the main distributor of Government funds to the arts in Scotland, Creative Scotland, and it’s clear (viz Chris Stark and others) that I can make the case for much more ambitious plans than would have been thinkable even a year ago. The window has moved and perhaps particularly in the last few weeks.

Some examples: while you might expect us to have Declared Emergency along with many other cultural organisations across the UK (including Jerwood Arts, the Royal Court TheatreBattersea Arts Centre, even not particularly radical Theatr Clwyd, for goodness’ sake ), perhaps more unexpectedly, Aberdeen Performing Arts and the Traverse joined in the Letters to the Earth project and the Edinburgh International Festival this summer is hosting the Royal Court in an International Climate Crisis Residency (note that’s a ‘climate crisis residency’, not even just a plain old ‘climate change’ one!). None of these projects would have happened, or been so overtly focused on climate change, even a year ago. The slow and steady stuff is working.


Main image: Diagram of The Overton Window, taken from https://voxeu.org/content/moving-overton-window-let-debate-continue

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: What exactly is the Overton Window? appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

News: New river pollution artwork unveiled at Almondell Park

Waste collected from a new RiverRubbish initiative puts the pollution of the river in the frame.

Waste collected from a new RiverRubbish initiative puts the pollution of the River Almond in the frame. Artist Annie Lord has transformed a small portion of the river waste gathered by local volunteers into an artwork that will serve as a reminder of the impact rubbish has on our rivers.

Unveiled at Almondell and Calderwood Country Park on the 8th March 2019, River Series: Almond has been created by Annie using everything from Tennent’s cans to wet wipes and more to create a striking piece encased in resin. What at first appears to be a depiction of riverbank nature is on closer inspection revealed to be reclaimed rubbish in disguise. Set to be displayed at the Almondell and Calderwood Country Park Centre, River Series: Almond hopes to encourage visitors to think twice when it comes to dealing with our rubbish.

Join us in the toilet block at the park’s visitor centre to have look and meet some of those involved in its production or visit at any point to see the art work.

The post News: New river pollution artwork unveiled at Almondell Park appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Arts Competition: Win £50 to help your green work!

How could £50 help your organisation’s Green Arts work? Send in your ideas for the chance to win in our Green Arts Competition!

Creative Carbon Scotland came joint-1st (once more!) in the Sustrans Scotland ‘Scottish Workplace Journey Challenge‘, with everyone in the organisation logging a low carbon journey – as well as a few of our friends from Festivals Edinburgh. For our efforts we’ve got a new proudly-displayed certificate and a count of how many donuts our exercise was equivalent to (63!) but we also won the opportunity to donate £50 to a charity of our choice: could this be you? We discussed it as team, and decided we wanted to use the donation to help support the fantastic Green Arts community’s work.

We weren’t the only ones in the sector riding (and walking, taking the bus etc) high, a big congratulations to Green Arts Initiative member National Galleries of Scotland who were top of the category of organisations with 250-499 employees!

Win £50 towards your Green Arts work

Now we’re on the hunt for the best sustainability idea from our Green Arts community. We’re running a competition over the course of May 2019: anyone from the Green Arts Initiative can submit an idea, and we’ll pick a winner to announce at the end of the month!

We know £50 won’t cover the costs of all your sustainability ambitions, but we hope it’ll help you get the ball rolling on something in your wish-list. Perhaps you want to invest in a bicycle pump and puncture repair kits to support your staff using active travel to get to work; reward your green team with some sustainable treats or pay for (sustainable) transport to Green Champion training. Anything goes, as long as it contributes to your environmental sustainability efforts!

Last year’s winner

The Green Team at Edinburgh International Book Festival, had the winning idea in last year’s competition of sending out letters to their donors using seeded/plantable paper – to remind the donors of the setting of the Book Festival’s settings in Charlotte Square Gardens, whilst spreading wildflowers throughout the UK to support pollinator populations.

Key Information/Tips

  • Submit your idea by 5pm on Friday 31st of May 2019.
  • Keep it simple: try to keep your idea to three sentences or less.
  • Your organisation has to be a Scottish-based cultural organisation, and a member of the Green Arts Initiative (join, if you’re not already a member!).
  • You can submit as many ideas as you want, and different people from the same organisation can submit different ideas.
  • It can contribute to an existing sustainability project, act as seed-funding for something new, or cover the costs of something small.
  • The winning idea will be selected by the Creative Carbon Scotland team for its creativity/originality/effectiveness/quality.
  • We’ll share our favourite ideas on our website, through our social media, and in our monthly Green Arts Round-Up to members.

The post Green Arts Competition: Win £50 to help your green work! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Artist Commissions for Art Walk Project’s ‘Footprint’ project

Artists are invited to apply for one of a number of paid commissions for this project, responding to the urban environment to devise mapped walks or cycles for the local community.

‘FOOTPRINT’ is a walking and cycling map + guide planned for East Edinburgh (Portobello, Leith) & Musselburgh  with artist-led routes that intersect the urban with nature through lesser used habitats, encouraging everyday physical activity as a way to improve well being.

We will be holding a number of public drop-in sessions at local markets and street locations during April-May from which a range of artist initiated walking & cycling routes will be based. A map + guide will be produced by December 2019 that presents around 6 routes for cycling and walking, and highlighting relevant sites that local communities have mapped within each of their neighbourhoods.

Two distinct opportunities are available for this project:

  • multiple commissions for devised and led walks and sessions with the local community
  • one commission for an artist to design and create the final map

ARTIST COMMISSIONS

The project will involve the developing of mapped routes working with local participants from each area alongside Art Walk Projects, leading a number of walks or cycles during June to October 2019. A finalised printed map will be produced by Dec 2019, in which each artist will be profiled alongside their mapped route.

Commission Details

We invite imaginative proposals that engage with local neighbourhoods, mark out the local, and intersect the three areas through lesser used habitats. Improving well being for participants is also an important element of this project, working to increase regular activity.

Each selected artist will be expected to:

  • Devise 1 route involving one or more of the areas – Leith, Portobello, Musselburgh;
  • Attend in the region of 2 public sessions meeting with participants;
  • Lead 2 walks or cycle journeys during the period June to Oct (including Art Walk Porty Festival 7-15 September).

Fee

In the region of 4 commissions are available – each receiving a bursary of £1000.

How to Apply

We are keen to hear from artists whose practice involves walking, mapping, journeying through lost urban landscape, or involving the study of the living urban environment. Ideally with a knowledge of one or more of the areas: Leith, Portobello, Musselburgh.

Please apply by emailing Rosy Naylor: rosy@artwalkporty.co.uk, with the following information (maximum 2 pages of A4):

  • Reasons for your interest in this project and how it relates to your current practice;
  • A description of the type of route or ideas you would be interested in exploring, including the area/s of most interest.

Please also include:

  • Your CV/artist statement
  • 4 examples of your recent work
  • Website/online links to view your work

Deadline for applications 1st May 2019 


ARTIST/ILLUSTRATOR

We also are seeking an illustrator to work with us to draw out the A2 folded map and provide graphics that are relevant to the project.

Fee

Fee in region of £1000.

How to Apply

Please apply by emailing Rosy Naylor: rosy@artwalkporty.co.uk, with the following information:

  • Details of what you believe you would bring to the project and your areas of interest/ or ideas you would seek to explore (maximum: 2 pages)
  • CV/artist statement
  • 4 examples of your recent work
  • Website/online links to view your work

Deadline for applications 1st May 2019 


#GreenArts Day: Wednesday 14th March 1Art Walk Projects are a member of our Green Arts Initiative: a networked community of practice for Scottish cultural organisations committed to reducing their environmental impact. It is free to become part of the community, and there are lots of resources and case studies (like this one!) to support #GreenArts organisations. Take a look at our Green Arts Initiative page for more information.

All images are from Art Walk Projects. Find more on their Instagram page.

The post Opportunity: Artist Commissions for Art Walk Project’s ‘Footprint’ project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Sniffer Vacancy – Communications Manager

Vacancy: Communications Manager to create compelling external communications and marketing materials

Sniffer is a sustainability charity that brings people and ideas together to create a sustainable and resilient society. This exciting new role will lead the creation of compelling external communication and marketing plans that increase the visibility of Sniffer and our programmes including Adaptation Scotland and Climate Ready Clyde.

The Communications Manager will:

  • Develop and implement effective communication strategies that raise awareness, engage stakeholders and meet funding requirements
  • Proactively promote and secure positive media coverage of Sniffer’s projects and activities, helping promote and shape public debate on sustainability and climate change issues
  • Manage the design and production of all online and print external facing documents and marketing materials
  • Create press releases, press kits, newsletters, and related marketing materials ensuring key messages are wide-reaching, impactful and consistent
  • Maximise the charity’s brand visibility at conferences and events through publicity and the production of relevant promotional materials
  • Improve communication of Sniffer’s purpose, programmes and projects, including updating our online presence.

For full information visit https://www.sniffer.org.uk/vacancies

Deadline Friday 3 May

The post Opportunity: Sniffer Vacancy – Communications Manager appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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“The Den Burn is flooding, don’t panic!”

On Tuesday (26 February), Primary 6 students of Fernielea Primary School performed two co-created songs about flooding as part of a project to connect local residents with flood risk and their environment through the medium of music as part of ‘Creative Approaches to Engaging Flood Risk Communities’.

“The Den Burn is flooding, don’t panic” was the key message of the first song, “The Burnie Journey”, sung by Mrs Leslie’s class to their fellow pupils and representatives from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), the Scottish Flood Forum and the Dee Catchment Partnership. The song aims to reassure students and local residents about flooding in their local burn and creatively inform them of some of the flood management schemes the council have set up including at the Den of Maidencraig and Stronsay Park, both of which are designed to store floodwater upstream, protecting roads and properties further downstream in the heart of Aberdeen.

As part of the project, Simon took the class on a walk of the Den Burn pointing out some of the flooding and flood management issues. The pupils took recordings of the sounds they heard and learned verses of the Burnie Journey song along the way

As part of the project, Simon took the class on a walk of the Den Burn pointing out some of the flooding and flood management issues. The pupils took recordings of the sounds they heard and learned verses of the Burnie Journey song along the way

The second song, “The Flood Kit”, is a memory song to the tune of “Rattlin’ Bog”, and was written with the class to remind them what useful items to include in a flood or emergency kit.

On working with the Primary 6 class, Simon Gall said:

“It’s been heartening to see the children engaging so enthusiastically with the Den Burn and flooding issues more generally. I think our hands-on, creative learning approach to the topic is key. The children use their creative skills to process and convert fairly pedestrian information – gathered first-hand – into something unique and memorable. I hope the experience leaves a lasting impression on them while also leaving some lovely creative work for others to use and enjoy.”

The project has been developed in partnership by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and Scotland’s culture and sustainability charity Creative Carbon Scotland. The project explores how creative approaches could be used by Scotland’s flooding authorities to engage with communities vulnerable to future flooding and raise levels of flood awareness and preparedness in a way that is meaningful and relevant to the community.

Primary 6 students during the earlier school visit

Some of the primary 6 student musical stars.

SEPA is Scotland’s national authority for flood forecasting and warning and works with communities to help them be more flood resilient. Recently, SEPA has significantly enhanced its existing warning service in north east Scotland with the addition of a new coastal flood warning scheme, covering 2033 properties in Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire and Angus, giving people time to take preparatory action against the impact of flood events.

Stewart Prodger, from SEPA’s Flooding team, said:

“Every day SEPA works to protect and enhance Scotland’s environment, including helping Scotland prepare more powerfully for future increased flooding. Getting the next generation involved in understanding how flooding happens is a vital part of how we do that, helping local communities become more resilient. More traditional engagement will always have its place, but making learning more fun and the message memorable can be a far more effective way to get young people interested and spreading the word to their friends and families on how they can be flood-prepared. This could include encouraging their parents to sign up to SEPA’s free public flood warning service, so free messages for home and travel areas can be delivered direct to their phone. Register online at https://floodline.sepa.org.uk/floodupdates/ or call 0345 988 1188.”

Director of Creative Carbon Scotland, Ben Twist, said:

“We’re thrilled to be working on this project with SEPA. As a charity which promotes, supports and harnesses the role of culture in addressing the climate crisis, we see a key role for creative practitioners, such as musicians, to help draw out the creativity and imagination of communities in their response to climate change and offer different skills and approaches to contribute to the work of organisations like SEPA.”

Councillor John Wheeler, Education Operational Delivery Convener, said:

“Our schools have a great record of getting involved in environmental projects across the city and in getting the local community involved. Only last week Orchard Brae School earned a prestigious Green Flag from Eco-Schools Scotland and it’s great to Fernielea School involved in a project like this with SEPA. I’m sure all the pupils and staff involved will find the day really rewarding”.


Creative Approaches to Engaging Flood Risk Communities is a partnership between SEPA and Creative Carbon Scotland support from Aberdeen City Council, has been commissioned by SEPA with via SEPA’s Research and Development Fund.

Creative Carbon Scotland’s involvement is part of its Culture/SHIFT programme which supports cultural and sustainability practitioners to explore new ways of working together to address complex problems and bring about transformational change.

The post “The Den Burn is flooding, don’t panic!” appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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