Creative Carbon Scotland

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Guide to Contributing to the Environment Connecting Theme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Scotland has identified the Environment as one of four the connecting themes that underpins its work and the work it supports as the national development agency for the arts, screen and creative industries.

As identified in the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009, Creative Scotland (and Scotland’s other public bodies) must act:

  1. in the way best calculated to contribute to delivery of the Act’s emissions reduction targets;
  2. in the way best calculated to deliver any statutory adaptation programme; and
  3. in a way that it considers most sustainable.

Creative Scotland has communicated this commitment in more detail in its 10 Year Plan, stating:

“Climate change is one of the most significant challenges that face us today. We want to ensure that we work in as sustainable a manner as possible and that the arts, screen and creative industries in Scotland do the same.”

How can we and those individuals and organisations working within the arts, screen and creative industries help contribute to Creative Scotland’s Environment Connecting Theme? We have provided the following guidance to highlight ways in which you and/or your organisation can lead by example and create a more sustainable Scotland while contributing to the Environment Connecting Theme.

Since 2011, we (Creative Carbon Scotland) have been supporting those working within the arts, screen and creative industries to reduce their organisation’s carbon emissions and environmental impacts as well as influence others about climate change and environmental sustainability. We have produced this guide to share what we think the basic, good and star contributions to the Environment Connecting Theme would be.


DOWNLOAD THE GUIDE

or read on for the web version.

The following table shows what we think would be Basic Compliance (ie the bare minimum for an application to hold its head up); Good Practice (ie an organisation that has good standards in this area); and Star Performer (ie an organisation that is leading the way) . We go into more detail below.

Guide to Contributing to the Environment Connecting Theme 1

Guide to Contributing to the Environment Connecting Theme

 

WHERE TO START:

Below we’ve indicated some places to start with helpful guides and examples to support and inspire you!

Reducing your own carbon emissions and other environmental impacts

  1. Appoint a Green Champion, or in a larger organisation, a Green Team.
  2. Understand your carbon footprint (Find out using claimexpenses.com or the Tenant Energy Toolkit)
  3. Develop an environmental sustainability policy and action plan.
  4. Join the Green Arts Initiative.
  5. Plan how to report this work to your Board.

Influencing others (artists, companies, audiences, suppliers, peers (other arts organisations etc), others)

  1. Include information about the work you are doing to reduce your footprint on your website, brochures, programmes, annual reports etc including membership of GAI!!
  2. Encourage sustainable travel by audiences, artists, freelancers and visitors. If needed, develop your travel policy and plan.
  3. Find suppliers who offer eco-friendly products, services and materials. (Read about what the Edinburgh International Book Festival or Film City Glasgow are doing in relation to sustainable procurement)
  4. Programming opportunities
    1. Within programme: commissioning, seeking existing work, telling artists you’re interested, framing work as relevant
    2. Outwith programming: discussions, using artists’ other interest

 


The post CCS February Newsletter appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Arts & Sustainability 2016 Residency Report Published

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

“CCS’s Arts & Sustainability Residency is becoming a major intersection point for artists and the most significant thinkers in sustainability.” Chris Fremantle, independent arts producer, writer & researcher

In September 2016, eight artists were invited to participate in CCS’s annual Arts & Sustainability Residency, working with facilitators Jan Bebbington (Professor of Accounting and Sustainable Development, Director, St Andrews Sustainability Institute) and Lex ter Braak (Director, Van Eyck Institute, Maastricht, Netherlands), and partnering with Cove Park.

Over an intensive three-day programme, participating artists were asked to reflect upon and develop their understanding of how their practices connected with themes surrounding the burgeoning field of the Anthropocene, and the wider cultural shift towards a more environmentally sustainable society.

Key questions and themes discussed included:

  • The contested starting points of the Anthropocene and the social, political and creative implications contingent on each of these;
  • The cultural responses that an understanding of geological deep time provokes;
  • The historical role of the artist in society;
  • Developing robust theories of change which can provide practical hope in addressing the transition away from unsustainable practices.

Download the Arts & Sustainability 2016 Report.

Arts & Sustainability 2016 Report Published 1

As well as supporting the development of artistic practices in Scotland, the Arts & Sustainability Residency plays an important role in shaping CCS’s thinking and work. Key learning points stemming from the residency on CCS’s role included:

  • Actively developing and brokering relationships artists and sustainability experts and institutions, helping to set the right terms for the ways in which artistic practices can contribute to environmental sustainability contexts;
  • Supporting and facilitating commissioning opportunities for the development of new artistic
    work in this area with other cultural organisations;
  • Continuing to create opportunities for learning and knowledge/practice exchange such as the residency and Green Tease events;
  • Making the most of artists’ curiosity and readiness for the unknown within the context of
    the challenges surrounding issues such as climate change.

CCS created a space where artists were not under pressure to produce new work, however, this hothouse of ideas organically gave way to inspiration, learning and forward planning. This allowed for a thorough reflection on creative practice and I left the residency feeling enriched, reassured and, in question of my working practices – all alongside a new, and growing, understanding of what my practice is about. I found [the Arts & Sustainability Residency] to be a transformative learning experience and I am excited to see where these new connections and understandings will lead.” Kathy Beckett


The post Arts & Sustainability 2016 Residency Report Published appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Eco Drama Board of Trustee

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The current Board of Directors comprises individuals with experience in Arts & Events Management, Education, Project Management, Fundraising, Technical Operations and Health and Safety.

We are particularly looking for individuals with skills in Fundraising, Marketing, Strategic Development, Business Management and Finance; ideally who are, or have been, involved in the arts, environment, education or social enterprise sectors.

We are looking for Board members that have a successful record of achievement in their field and ideally a genuine interest in children’s theatre, the arts, education and conservation of the environment.

Board members must be advocates for Eco Drama and its aims and objectives as a social enterprise, be eager to maximise their professional and personal connections to help promote and/or raise funds for the company, and be able to support Eco Drama to develop and present ambitious projects both locally and nationally.

Trustees would be required to attend 4 Board Meetings per year, lasting 2 hours each, usually on week day evenings 6-8pm at Eco Drama’s Glasgow city centre office. Trustees would also be required for a reasonable amount of contact on email/telephone when advice or skills may be sought. Eco Drama will actively seek out opportunities for training and professional development that will nurture the role of a Trustee.

Trustees are voluntary and unpaid roles, however reasonable travel expenses to and from meetings will be paid.

Becoming a Trustee with Eco Drama is a unique opportunity to make a real difference in the community and to be a hands-on part of a developing organisation, as well as adding value to your CV.

Eco Drama is an award winning touring children’s theatre company delivering theatre productions, workshops and creative learning projects to schools, festivals, theatres and community venues across Scotland. Uniquely touring in an electric car and eco van run on recycled cooking oil, our work is celebrated for engaging and inspiring young people in the value of caring for our natural world. The company also creates educational resources, deliver continued professional development sessions for teachers and host community events.

The Trustee Job Description & Application Form are available on our website: http://www.ecodrama.co.uk/2017/02/eco-drama-seek-trustees/



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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: 2050 Climate Group Young Leaders Development Programme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The 2050 Climate Group are looking for bright, passionate young professionals and recent graduates (aged ~ 20-30) working in any sector/industry across Scotland to join this year’s 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme (YLDP).

As a 2050 Young Leader, you will:

  • Receive leadership training from Scotland’s foremost experts
  • Build knowledge of climate change issues and solutions facing Scotland’s people and private, public and third sectors
  • Improve your communication and influencing skills
  • Increase your confidence in your ability to tackle climate change
  • Build your CV with skills and experience
  • Be part of a growing network of passionate, diverse young people
  • Inspire others to actively contribute towards taking action now and shaping a sustainable future for all

To join the 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme you will need:

  • Passion and ambition
  • A desire to develop your leadership, communication and networking skills
  • Personal drive and energy
  • A willingness to attend at least 6 Saturday training and development sessions over the course of a year to enhance your knowledge and skills
  • The enthusiasm to use the knowledge and skills learnt to take action on climate change

How to apply:

The 2050 Climate Group are pleased to offer this leadership programme at no financial cost to participants, other than the costs associated with travel costs to each of the events.

If you’re interested in joining the programme, please visit their website for more information or fill in the application form.

Application Deadline: 20 March @ 17:00.  Please note that at the end of April, we will be holding an induction event for this year’s young leaders.

For more information on the 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme please do not hesitate to contact Sarah at recruitment@2050.scot

The post Opportunity: 2050 Climate Group Young Leaders Development Programme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: CCS Digital Communications Officer (part time, 3 days/week)

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re excited to announce that we’re recruiting for a Digital Communications Officer to join the CCS team and contribute to the transition to a more sustainable Scotland by connecting culture and climate change.

Role summary

Digital communications play an increasingly important role in achieving Creative Carbon Scotland’s mission and objectives. The Digital Communications Officer will take a lead on managing current digital platforms and tools and developing new content and resources to ensure our outcomes are achieved across cultural and sustainability sectors, as well as managing the Communications Strategy with the CCS Producer. In the coming years, the Digital Communications Officer will also lead on the development of the CCS website (anticipated re-launch 2019).

Salary: £23,000 pro rata (0.6FTE) + up to 3% of salary in pension contributions matching employee’s contributions

Hours: Part time (0.6 FTE). A 22.5 hour week with a degree of flexibility on both sides, as some evening and weekend work may be required and busy periods may call for extra hours, with time taken off in lieu during quieter periods. Extra days’ work are likely to occur around specific project development and delivery.

Flexible working and Job Sharing: Creative Carbon Scotland welcomes proposals for flexible working or job-share, subject to the needs of the role being satisfactorily fulfilled.

Holidays: 12 days plus 6 public holidays (20 days/10 days pro rata) to be taken at times agreed with the producer

Contract and notice period: This is a fixed term contract until 31 March 2018. Continuation of the contract is anticipated subject to funding. A probationary period of 3 months will apply, following successful completion of which the full fixed term contract will be confirmed.

Place of work: Based at Waverley Court, East Market Street, Edinburgh, but home working and hot-desking may also be necessary. Travel throughout Scotland required.

Secondments: Creative Carbon Scotland is very willing to consider a secondment for this role where this will embed carbon reduction knowledge and work within the cultural sector.

Equal Opportunities: Creative Carbon Scotland is committed to actively promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in all of our work. This applies both to the services we provide to others and the way in which we ourselves operate. We are able to make reasonable adjustments to the Digital Communications Officer role to support equal opportunities in the recruitment process. If you have any enquiries regarding access requirements please contact gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Main purpose of job:    

  • Development and delivery of CCS’s digital strategy;
  • Development and delivery of CCS’s communications strategy with CCS Producer;

Main Responsibilities:

Development and delivery of CCS’s digital strategy 

  • Ongoing maintenance of, and leading on the re-development of CCS website;
  • Creation of digital content including video, photographic, graphic and written content, digital resources, stakeholder reports, event documentation, and monthly newsletters;
  • Coordination of digital services including public webinars and video conferences;
  • Coordination and development of internal I.T. systems and procedures.

Development and delivery of CCS’s communications strategy 

CCS Strategy & Team support

  • Contribute to devising and delivering CCS’s overall strategic mission
  • Contribute to weekly team planning and evaluation meetings
  • Assist the wider team with project delivery as appropriate

The list of responsibilities is not exhaustive and the employee may be required to perform duties outside of this as operationally required and at the discretion of the Director.

Please note that during the phase of website re-development, the position hours will likely increase subject to agreement between the employee and employer.

How to apply

Please download and read carefully through the Digital Communications Office Job Description & Person Specification

Please apply for the post of Digital Communications Officer using our online application form.

Your application must include:

  • Your CV
  • Evidence of how you fit the person specification outlined in the Job Description & Person Specification via the online application form.
  • A maximum of three examples of your relevant work, either copies or links
  • Confirmation that you have completed the Equal Opportunities monitoring survey

Deadline: Midnight, Sunday 26th February

Interviews will be held on Thursday 9th March in Edinburgh

 

The post Opportunity: CCS Digital Communications Officer (part time, 3 days/week) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Workshops on the ‘Environment Connecting Theme’

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Workshops on Creative Scotland’s Environment Connecting Theme

Creative Scotland has identified climate change and environmental sustainability as one of its cross cutting themes, in line with its duties under the Climate Change Act. This is reflected in its Environment Connecting Theme. But what is the Environment Connecting Theme, and how can arts, screen and creative industry organisations contribute to it?

In February, we will be holding workshops on the Environment Connecting Theme. Read on for more details.

What is the Environment Connecting Theme?

Creative Scotland have provided the following guidance about the Environment Connecting Theme:

Across the network of organisations that we will fund, the key outcomes in relation to Environment are:

  • Reduce the direct environmental impacts of our work
  • Influence others on issues relating to the environment

What is the criterion for Environment?

How well is Environment embedded across all aspects of your organisation and its work?

How will we assess this?

We will particularly look for:

  • Any systems in place to measure your carbon emissions, any policies or plans for environmental sustainability including reducing your emissions.
  • A Board or staff member who has responsibility for or actively champions environmental issues within the organisation and that there is a clear structure to address any issues.
  • Any opportunities [which you are taking] to influence others with whom you engage

How Creative Carbon Scotland can help

Regarding the direct environmental impacts of your work, Creative Carbon Scotland can help provide support on measuring and monitoring your carbon emissions (whether you’re an individual or an organisation in the arts, screen or creative industries) as well as further explore how you can embed the environment in every aspect of your work.

From April 2015 onwards, Creative Scotland’s Regularly Funded Organisations (RFOs) are required to measure and report their carbon emissions and did so for the first time in September 2016 (see the Carbon Reporting Infographic for an idea of what RFOs voluntary reported on in 2014-15).  We’ll continue to provide support in this area, and any organisation starting out on this journey or wanting further help should contact Fiona MacLennan, our Carbon Reduction Project Manager, to discuss their needs.

Now that carbon measurement and reporting is established in the cultural sector, the development of plans to reduce carbon emissions is the logical next step, and leading organisations will reflect this in their work. We’ll be focusing our technical support on this area in 2017.

Regarding the influencing role identified by Creative Scotland, in February we will run free workshops in Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow as well as an online webinar to consider this less developed area:

  • Communicating organisations’ own work on environmental sustainability to audiences, suppliers, staff, freelancers and artists
  • Programming work that touches upon or explores environmental sustainability and climate change, both within and outwith the organisations’ usual programme
  • Engaging staff with climate change and environmental sustainability more widely

We’ll discuss the areas you might think about and provide examples of interesting work from around the world. The workshops will last about 2 hours and refreshments will be provided.

The post Opportunity: Workshops on the ‘Environment Connecting Theme’ appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


About Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Ben’s Strategy Blog: It IS what you do (not just the way that you do it)

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: It IS what you do (not just the way that you do it) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

The Climate Change (Scotland) Act of 2009 places a duty on every public body to act:
1) in the way best calculated to contribute to delivery of the Act’s emissions reduction targets;
2) in the way best calculated to deliver any statutory adaptation programme; and
3) in a way that it considers most sustainable.

But what does that third duty really mean?

Most if not all public bodies, which include everything from local authorities, universities and NHS trusts to cultural NDPBs such as Creative Scotland and the National Galleries, are now reporting and working to reduce their direct carbon emissions and developing adaptation plans. But the third duty is less specific and, I think, less acted upon. Indeed the 2011 Guidance on putting the Public Bodies Duty into practice is much less detailed about what ‘Acting Sustainably’ means, partly I imagine because it will mean very different things to different organisations.

The first two Public Bodies Duties focus on the direct impacts and responses to climate change of the Bodies involved. They must consider their own carbon emissions and their own adaptation plans. But George Tarvit of the Sustainable Scotland Network, which works with Public Bodies to support them in their duties under the act, points out that the third duty provides an opportunity to look not at their operations, but at their functions: what they do, not how they do it. And to me, this is the more interesting area.

A core finding of my PhD research, working with His Majesty’s Theatre (HMT) in Aberdeen, is that whilst the theatre triggers hundreds of thousands of journeys each year by audience members, 70% of which are made by car, the theatre hadn’t previously been involved in transport planning in the region. Meanwhile Aberdeenshire Council, from where many of the journeys start, hadn’t previously talked to HMT about transport planning; nor had Stagecoach, which provides the relevant bus service. A similar situation recently came to light at a meeting convened by Transport Scotland of the Edinburgh Festivals and all the relevant transport providers. In both of these situations, the individual organisations were generally thinking about their own climate impacts and adaptation, but perhaps not how they were involved in, and could help influence, those of their partners and collaborators.

Working together

My project in Aberdeen brought together HMT, Aberdeenshire Council and Stagecoach to work together to overcome some of the barriers to travelling by bus which no single partner could control – things like the geography of Aberdeen or the coordination of bus services with show times. Whilst the project was only moderately successful in moving people from car to bus, it was acknowledged that these changes take time. What I hope will be its greatest success is that HMT will now see itself as an active partner in transport planning and the others will consider the theatre in their strategic planning. If so they will be able to have a much greater impact on theatregoers’ travel than if they all act individually.

There’s a link here, incidentally, with the Scottish Government’s ISM (individual/social/ material) model of behaviour change. Behaviour change usually focuses on the individual whose behaviour someone is hoping to change (the clue’s in the name). But the ISM model can (I’d say should, but that’s a different blog) be used to influence not individuals but those bodies, companies etc which control or dictate the ‘material’, whether that be the physical infrastructure or the laws, regulations and immaterial infrastructure that we operate within.

There is such a thing as society

The Public Bodies between them interact constantly with all of Scotland’s population. Their first two duties clearly focus on their own climate impacts and adaptation. When it comes to Acting Sustainably, I’d suggest it would be useful to think about how they can work together and with other partners to change the complex social system within which we all live (you might want to call this ‘society’) to help achieve those demanding national carbon reduction targets and adapt to the new world we are building.

Alongside the Act and the Guidance sits another document, the Low Carbon Scotland: Public Engagement Strategy. This was published at the tail end of 2010 and focuses on achieving the carbon reduction targets set by the Act. It stresses that:

Setting targets was just the start. Achieving them can only be done through a joint approach, with government; the private, public and third sectors; local communities and individuals all contributing. (p4)

Let’s consider the role of the cultural strategy

As I have argued before in these blogs, achieving these very demanding targets – which may well be increased in forthcoming legislation following the Paris Agreement – will require a massive change in the ways in which the people of Scotland live. In other words, a massive change in our culture in the widest sense. The Public Engagement Strategy only touches upon culture – in the narrower sense of what the Mexico City Declaration describes as ‘the arts and letters’ – very briefly. On p10 it states, ‘We will also consider the role of the cultural sector which has the capacity to educate, influence and stimulate debate.’ Whilst I would say this is rather a narrow vision of what culture is (there’s more to it than the cultural sector) and what it can do, it’s good to see it in there.

Of the Public Bodies, a number have a cultural focus: Creative Scotland, the National Galleries, Historic Environment Scotland, the National Museums, the National Records of Scotland and the National Library. The Scottish Government has seconded Creative Scotland’s very forward-thinking Director of Arts and Engagement Leonie Bell to write a Cultural Strategy. Wouldn’t it be interesting and exciting to see the Cultural Strategy take on the challenge of climate change directly and develop the role of culture in steering us towards a positive future? Wouldn’t it be interesting if the cultural NDPBs, as those bodies shaping our wider culture, were to take a lead and make building a low-carbon, equitable, post-climate changed society a part of their core purpose?

 

Image Credit: Ella Fitzgerald New York ca 1946. William P Gottlieb


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for Papers: Postcards from the Anthropocene

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from the University of Edinburgh’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

The post Call for Papers: Postcards from the Anthropocene appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



If the emergence of the Anthropocene implies an epistemological shift, how might this transform the way we think about representation and, more specifically, its geopolitics? What kinds of representations carry significant material, metaphorical and methodological implications for this question, and can help us to ‘situate’ ourselves – if that is a still viable term – in our new conditions of groundlessness and scalelessness?

This symposium proposes to explore this through the motif of ‘Postcards from the Anthropocene’. The postcards that we imagine are documentary space-time snapshots, which convey complex assemblages of dynamic, non-linear, unpredictable, ad-hoc networks between interdependent and trans-scalar actants. They may raise questions about the ethical and political challenges of the dominant modes of technoscientific production in the Anthropocene, modes that are constituted through existing power relationships, subject positions, differences and inequalities. On the other hand, they might open up new streams of speculative and creative geopolitical imaginaries and forms of collective subjectivities that recalibrate existing value systems and indicate alternatives.

For this symposium we are seeking presentations that deploy different formats to reflect upon new kinds of reciprocity between geopolitics and representation through a found, described, designed or imagined postcard from the Anthropocene. We anticipate that this proliferation of anthropocenic representations will reveal and encourage transformations in practices of scrutinizing, strategizing, mediating and assembling, which are in turn animated in complex ways by operations that range from positioning, scaling, scripting, and weathering to fabricating, mining, reframing and recalibrating.

Two kinds of submissions are invited. Intending participants should submit either:

1) a 300-word abstract of a proposed conference presentation;

or 2) a single image together with a 300-word commentary on it. Invitations to speak at the symposium will be extended on the basis of the abstracts. The image/text submissions will be reviewed, and selected submissions presented in a parallel format in the symposium.

SUBMISSIONS

Proposals should be sent by email to postcardsfromtheanthropocene@gmail.com by Friday, February 24th 2017. Proposals should also include a short biographical note (maximum 150 words), together with the author’s institutional address and full contact details.

PUBLICATION

It is intended that an edited book will be developed from selected papers and images presented at the symposium.

CONTACT

postcardsfromtheanthropocene@gmail.com

MORE INFORMATION

www.postcardsfromtheanthropocene.com


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Open Call: The Morning Boat Research and Production Residency

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Introduction

The morning boat is an international artist residency and laboratory for artistic research and action. Activities will focus on local industries in Jersey that are often referred to as the foundations of the island economy – Agriculture, finance and tourism – and their impact on people’s lives. The morning boat responds to an urgent need for a reflective and meaningful public discourse on complex critical issues and real life practices that are central to the island’s economy, social fabric and way of life. Artists will be invited to Jersey whose work is thought provoking, unforgettable, accessible to its audience and sensitive to the context in which it is presented. Projects will be developed specifically for the island of Jersey, responding to its unique character and narrative. Work will take place in public spaces and every-day working environments, in collaboration with the local community.

Thematic focus for 2017 and 2018: Agriculture and fisheries

Working together with farmers, fishermen, seasonal workers, politicians, chefs, retailers and consumers, artists are asked to investigate and respond to the locally grown, caught, gathered and reared food chain. They will explore the past, present and future implications of agricultural practices in Jersey. They will interact with and respond to existing infrastructures, farming practices, social structures, economic conditions and the products themselves.

Working with and for the local community

The morning boat aims to be an arts residency that takes place in the heart of the local community, from the research that is undertaken, through to the public presentation of the work. At the start of each residency artists will be paired with local experts and employees, to conduct first-hand research and develop an understanding towards industry practices, working environments, concerns and challenges. This experience provides the starting point and inspiration for continued research and the creation of new work that interacts with existing infrastructures and reimagines daily routines.

Conditions

Artists will receive an artist fee of between 1800 and 2000 pounds for a period of approximately four weeks in Jersey. Travel expenses will be reimbursed and accommodation will be provided. A small production budget will be available for materials and a network of partners are standing by to provide additional material and logistical support. The curatorial team will assist you throughout the residency, but a level of autonomy is desirable.

Application process

Please read the FULL OPEN CALL document for application details. Submission deadline: February 10th 2017.

Selection criteria

The morning boat is a multi-disciplinary programme. Among others, we welcome proposals from architects, film makers, theater practitioners, puppeteers, choreographers, robotic engineers, writers, sculptors, sound artists, musicians, textile designers, food artists, interdisciplinary collectives and undefinable practices. A specialism in public art practices (either as ‘interventions’ or as live programmed events), might be helpful, but is not essential.

More information is available on The Morning Boat website.

The post Open Call: The Morning Boat Research and Production Residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


 


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Shaping the Future of Festival Vision: 2025 at The Festival Suppliers Awards

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Meeting to shape the future of Festival Vision:2025 at The Festival Supplier Awards, Jan 26th 2017

The post Shaping the Future of Festival Vision: 2025 at The Festival Suppliers Awards appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Powerful Thinking and Julie’s Bicycle will hold the first Festival Vision:2025 meeting at The Festival Suppliers Awards on January 26th 2017 at The Hurlingham Club, London.

The Meeting will bring together 30 plus Vision Festivals, events that have pledged to work together for a more sustainable festival industry, to shape the future of the 10-year Vision, and take part in professional skills workshops for their onward journey to more sustainable events.

The day will include workshops on reducing fuel use and energy costs, waste management, sustainable travel, and accurate measuring and recording of impact data by Julie’s Bicycle, ZAP Concepts, and the sustainability teams from Shambala Festival, Festival Republic and Cambridge Folk Festival.

Alison Tickell, CEO of Julie’s Bicycle, will host a discussion on the future of the Vision as well as giving attendees a broader perspective of the opportunity in the arts and cultural sector for climate leadership.

Guest speakers will include Richard Gillies, former Sustainability Director for The Kingfisher Group and Marks & Spencer, and CEO of Festival On The Wall, who brings insight into influencing the supply chain change in a client facing business.

There will also be space to network and share experiences as well as explore opportunities for collaboration and influencing the supply chain through collective purchasing.

The event is free for Vision:2025 Festivals who will also receive a free place to The Festival Suppliers Awards (normally £280), which are generously hosting the event, including drinks reception, evening dinner and awards ceremony — where Powerful Thinking Steering group member Victoria Chapman, Sustainability Coordinator for Festival Republic, will present the Green Supplier Award on behalf of Powerful Thinking.

There are still a few places available for the event. All UK Music Festivals are welcome to reserve a ticket providing they have taken the Festival Vision: 2025 pledge to aim for a more sustainable event.

For more details contact bethan@powerful-thinking.org.uk


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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