Creative Carbon Scotland

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Opportunity: QEST Craft Funding – applications opening soon

The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) are open for applications on 14th July – 24th August 2020.

The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST) awards scholarship and apprenticeship funding of up to £18,000 to talented and aspiring craftspeople working in a broad range of skills, from farriery and cheese maturing to jewellery design, silversmithing and sculpture. Our next application round is open 14 July – 24 August 2020 and we are looking for more talented applicants!

QEST celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2020 and since 1990 has awarded over £4.5 million to more than 550 individuals working in over 130 different crafts. We define craft broadly and welcome applications from all areas including rural skills, contemporary craft, conservation, luthiery and much more.

A directory of all our alumni can be seen on our website, along with more details on how to apply. We have two application rounds each year.

The post Opportunity: QEST Craft Funding – applications opening soon appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Guest Blog: Here. Now. The world changes.

This guest blog by writer and artist Wallace Heim was originally given as an introductory talk at a Green Tease online meetup discussing how arts and culture can adjust and continue our planning for COP26 in light of COVID-19 and the postponement of the conference. She reflects on the role of the arts in crises, the impact of social distancing, and what we can learn from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

I’d like to offer some thoughts about the arts and climate instability – and this confluence of COP26 and COVID-19.

Back in 2015, alongside COP21 in Paris, Creative Carbon Scotland devised a new kind of ArtsCOP festival –  happening in the places where people make art. It was dispersed over time and locations. The festival worked from home. The animating force was to encourage artists and practitioners to initiate, develop, extend their projects to engage with climate change as it was then understood.

ArtsCOP Scotland showed how an organisation can grasp the fundamentals of a problem – which was how to be part of COP21 without travelling – and, within its resources, create the potential for new work. This new kind of festival, in many ways, simply dissolved the problem.

Many of the performance works that were made then brought out views of an imagined, troubled, future world – distant enough to hold and turn in your hand and contemplate.

Now, a human pandemic conjoins with and expresses the climate crisis, and the present urgency holds at once a terrifying uncertainty and the potential for a more ecologically just world.

COVID-19 is forcing humans to look deep within the chasms of our social and economic and environmental habits and assumptions, the insanities and injustices and invisible conveniences that make up everyday life. It is there, in the red hot recesses and fault-lines where the patterns of connections with climate instability can be made.

The arts may be not only about delving into the fractures. But – and more positively – they may show the deep-rooted possibilities of how to live, and how to live well and equitably with the other-than-human.

I need to say that artists do what they do, and that is not activism or public information in another guise. I’m not suggesting a directive – but am supporting the exchanges of capabilities and knowledge and privileges that can happen, and are being suggested here, whether COP comes to Glasgow or not.

I want to mention two things that are immediately in mind about making and experiencing art right now.

First, how will artists and others find ways of researching their work and ways of making relations with their human audience under physical distancing. Too, how do we negotiate the emotional and psychological effects when we do return to being near each other again.

This human distancing affects, as well, how people can relate with their environments, with the more-than or other-than-human. How will those relations be made and be changed –  maybe with more sensitivity and need?

How will those changes come through into the experiences of art.

Second, these smooth-screened technological supports that we rely on now and are adapting to – won’t fit every kind of artistic experience. Ideas for different kinds of relations between works of art and the public will need to be explored – that live pulse needs to continue somehow.

But here we are.

I’m finding that COVID is both depleting my attention, at the same time as leading me to think on some of the big societal concepts and ideas and whether they  – like tectonic plates – are shifting, and how might they shift to more ecologically wise formulations. This shifting is a raw material for performance, theatre and art.

For example, in relation to COP26, I’m thinking about sovereignty – a very big concept… The states that have gathered for all the COPs have had to negotiate how climate instability blurs, if not erases the assumptions of state sovereignty. Closer in, the virus has upturned many ideas about the extensions, limits and responsibilities of the state.

How can an ecological contract be found and agreed that defends and builds back the historical achievements of the austerity-depleted social contract?

More intimately, what is a ‘border’, when the arbitrary border between states may be expressed in the soft human tissues of my lungs?

And last, keeping to this intimate, sensual and material level –  what does it mean to care – to care for the other-than-human – the living beings, the elements, the forces. Who does it? What does it look like? Feel like? Over what timescales? What parts of the world get cared for or abandoned? What is the relation between care and justice? How can artistic practices show tenderness and care? Should they?

COP is a punctuation. It is a global moment of exceedingly slow advance. Things can move much faster and deeper on the ground, at home, setting a context for and even counter-forces to – the gathered institutional powers. The arts sector is integral to this.

I look forward to how the people and groups here – artists and activists – will perceive a problem over the next months – maybe a conceptual problem about how one pursues meaning, or maybe a logistical one like over distancing  – and then find a way of working that dissolves the problem.

And I look forward to breathing again – taking my breath again –  with a room full of strangers.


Wallace Heim has written on ecology and the arts – on performed arts and social and environmental practices – for many years – and mostly from philosophical perspectives. Most recently, she has gone back to working as an artist –  writing for and producing performed works and making sculptures – these have been about the Solway Firth, the release of nuclear waste, about caring for contaminated land, about how to make decisions over the next hundred and more years.

You can read a blog about the online event Wallace spoke at on the ecoartscotland website.

If you are interested in getting further involved with planning for COP26, why not join the #arts4cop26 Facebook group.

The post Guest Blog: Here. Now. The world changes. appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: PhD studentship

Following a successful joint proposal to the Scottish Graduate School for Arts & Humanities between the University of Glasgow and Creative Carbon Scotland, we are delighted to invite applications for a fully funded PhD studentship.

The interdisciplinary project – “Assessing arts-based interventions for sustainable practice” – will observe a range of creative interventions, critically reflect upon them as both artistic creations and mechanisms for change within an Energy and Environmental Humanities framework, and develop a portable qualitative framework for the design and assessment of arts-based interventions.

The successful candidate will spend time with Creative Carbon Scotland assessing what makes arts-based interventions effective in realising sustainable cultural and social changes at the local, institutional and regional level.

University of Glasgow’s Dr Tom Bartlett from the School of Critical Studies and Dr Richard Williams from the School of Geographical & Earth Sciences will supervise this AHRC Collaborative Doctoral studentship, due to commence in Autumn 2020.

Deadline for applications is Friday 3rd July 2020.

Click here for full details of the PhD project and application process

The post Opportunity: PhD studentship appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Job: Administration and Finance Officer

Creative Carbon Scotland is seeking a technically minded and suitably experienced individual to help with everyday administration as well as financial systems. 

Details of the Administration and Finance Officer role

Hours: part-time (30 hours per week)

Salary: £25,000 pro rata (i.e. £20,000 for a 30-hour week)

Location: Edinburgh

Fixed term role: July 2020 to 31st March 2021 (with a view to extend depending on funding)

Deadline for applications: 5pm, Monday 22nd June 2020

Complete the form below to apply

Download the full job description and person specification

About this new role

Creative Carbon Scotland believes that the arts and culture have an essential role to play in achieving the transformational change to a sustainable future. With the Scottish Government’s strengthened ambition to make Scotland a world leader in addressing the climate emergency and a cultural sector keen and equipped to play its part, we are busier than ever and our growing, committed and friendly team is working on ambitious projects in both the climate change and cultural spheres. Therefore, we are seeking a technically minded and suitably experienced individual to join us to help with everyday administration as well as financial systems to ensure that we are working effectively at this demanding but exciting time.

Key responsibilities

1. Ensuring that our office and remote-working services enable the charity to operate effectively (40%) by:

a) ensuring that our Microsoft Office Sharepoint, Teams, document management, communications and other IT systems are up to date and working at the highest level

b) developing, maintaining and improving office systems, including our contacts database, and ensuring that we comply with GDPR

c) ensuring that equipment and resources are fit for purpose, fully functional and comply with relevant health and safety standards

d) liaising with the Facilities team in our host organisation and supporting team members in effective and safe home-working

2. Maintaining financial systems and other records (20%), including:

a) processing invoices and payments working with the bookkeeper

b) managing online and paper finance files

c) monitoring expenditure and income relating to our IT subscriptions and reporting regularly on these

d) ensuring compliance with funders’ requirements including regular reporting

3. Providing administrative support for all staff as appropriate, including organising CCS meetings (including quarterly Board meetings), travel, events and projects, both face-to-face and virtual, and involving a range of participants from local to national and international (10%)

4. Ensuring internal communication is effective (10%), including:

a) organising and minuting weekly team meetings

b) managing our effective use of Microsoft Teams

c) managing incoming contact via the corporate email and phone

5. Ensuring that all CCS staff understand how to use office equipment, tools and resources, including software, and provide support and training as required (5%)

6. Providing administrative support in the recruitment and induction of freelance and employed staff (5%)

7. Supporting the communications work of CCS (5%)

8. Other duties as required, including ensuring that our Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan is considered and acted upon in all the above areas.  (5%)

Person specification

We will use evidence of these skills and experience in your application to select candidates for interview, so please make sure that you fit the requirements and demonstrate this in your answers to the questions on the application form.

NB: due to the fixed-term nature of the role and Creative Carbon Scotland’s circumstances, this opportunity is only open to those who already have the right to work in the UK.

Essential 

  • A high level of organisational, administrative and customer service skills
  • Experience of office and/or home-working management and administration, including practices to reduce the environmental impact of these
  • Excellent knowledge and understanding of best practice in data protection and information security, human resources, and equalities, diversity and inclusion
  • Excellent IT skills including in-depth knowledge of Microsoft Office suite (including SharePoint and Microsoft Teams), virtual and remote working software and tools, wi-fi connectivity solutions and printer/scanner interface
  • Good knowledge of using social media for business purposes
  • Excellent interpersonal, oral and written communication skills
  • A high level of transferable skills, including attention to detail and problem-solving, time management, confidentiality and discretion
  • Flexible and proactive with the ability to prioritise effectively
  • Flair and imagination

Desirable 

  • Experience of providing guidance, both spoken and written, in new administrative procedures, use of IT equipment and software
How to apply

Please read carefully and then follow the instructions in the application form [HERE]. The form will ask you to make clear why you are interested in this role and to demonstratehow your experience and skills match those outlined above.

As part of your application, please complete our Equalities Monitoring Survey. The application form will ask you to confirm that you have done so. NB: This is anonymous and the information provided will not affect your application in any way.

If you would like to discuss the role or have any questions, please contact Alexis Woolley.

The closing date for applications is 5pm on Monday 22nd June 2020.

Interviews will be held remotely on Monday 29th June (and Tuesday 30th June, if necessary)

Download the full job description and person specification

The post Job: Administration and Finance Officer appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Open call: Reimagining Museums for Climate Action

In the lead-up to COP26, Museums for Climate Change invite concept and design proposals that radically reimagine the museum as an institution to help shape meaningful climate action.

Eight competition winners will be awarded £2500 each to develop their ideas for an exhibition at Glasgow Science Centre ahead of and during COP26.

What can museums be?

This competition invites you to think about how new approaches to the design, organisation and experience of museums can amplify and accelerate climate action in diverse contexts and at various scales, enabling museums and society to move farther, faster, together to a net-zero or zero-carbon future.

The organisers, Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Heritage Priority Areaand Glasgow Science Centre, particularly welcome proposals that address the following two priority themes: climate justice and green futures.

Important dates

Registration deadline: 31st July 2020

Submission deadline: 15th September 2020

Winners announced: 8th October 2020

Exhibition opens: March 2021 (dependent on rescheduled COP26 dates)

For more information and to download the full brief, visit Reimagining Museums for Climate Change.

The post Open call: Reimagining Museums for Climate Action appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Ben’s Strategy Blog: Navigating a future for our arts post-COVID-19

Implicit in much of the discussion about the COVID-19 lockdown is an assumption that we will exit from this pandemic and return to some sort of ‘normal’, albeit possibly a ‘new normal’. However, there is a small but real chance that there is no end in sight for social distancing and that our society, economy and cultural activity is enormously changed. How do we go about thinking through this possibility in order to prepare?

Scotland’s cultural sector is in terrible pain and filled with uncertainty about the future. Artists and freelancers have seen their work dry up completely whilst companies have had to cancel performances, exhibitions and events through to the summer, with a second wave of cancellations now beginning. Film and TV production has all but stopped and cinemas are closed, even if streaming is booming. Edinburgh’s festivals from Easter through to the August jamboree have all been cancelled and tens if not hundreds of others across Scotland will follow suit. Individuals and organisations are facing a massive loss of income, despite Creative Scotland’s re-allocation of its funding and support. Many staff have been furloughed. Meanwhile, audiences across the land are missing the thrill and inspiration that comes from seeing and hearing live performances and events and experiencing works of art up close and full size.

Social not-distancing

The whole of the European performing arts tradition is based on people gathering together in a space, usually a building, for a shared experience. In this experience the audience plays an important part: a feedback loop between the stage and the audience energises both parties; the audience member’s experience is changed and heightened by their sharing it with other audience members; the performance changes with the presence of the audience as they see or hear and respond to what happens on stage, which influences, in real time, the performers’ interpretations and delivery. Part of the experience of participating in culture is also the social element: the mingling beforehand, seeing friends, enjoying (or not) the event as a group. Accordingly, the very architecture of cultural buildings and the work they put on are designed for people not social distancing. Like the best parties, the best theatre, music and dance takes place when as many people as possible are squeezed into slightly too small a space.

When will the lockdown end?

In the media the discussion is all about when the lockdown will end but, in the absence of a vaccine, the infamous herd immunity or COVID-19 for some other reason fading away (as other coronaviruses such as SARS admittedly have), performing arts events at least seem unlikely to restart for some time. A vaccine needs to be proven safe and then produced in massive quantities and the experts are talking about some time next year at the earliest – if one can be developed, which is not a given. The chances are that there will be some loosening of restrictions before a total relaxation but bringing large groups of people together in enclosed spaces is likely to be last on the list. As a leader in The Economist (free, but you need to register) says: ‘Managing [a part-locked-in, part-let-out world] depends on testing… It will not be available on a truly mass scale for many months’.

Time for difficult thinking – but how do we do it?

The UK’s status as one of the worst countries in dealing with the virus demonstrates why it’s important to prepare and think about difficult problems in advance. Although it’s hard and upsetting, while some of the cultural sector’s effort should be directed to working out how to get back to work, there also needs to be some thinking about what we do if that simply isn’t possible, at least for some years. But, how do we go about thinking about such an enormous change?

COVID-19 has provided us with an unwanted rehearsal for many of the issues that global heating raises (this article provides a take on this and it is interesting to read just three weeks after it was posted, when some of the more outlandish things it discusses have already come to pass) and there is a useful link with the way in which some people are thinking about adaptation to the impacts of climate change.

Creative Carbon Scotland is part of the Clyde: Re:Built project (a Deep Demonstration Project co-funded by EIT Climate-KIC) developing a transformational adaptation strategy and implementation plan for the Glasgow City Region. One of the project partners has done a review of the literature about what transformation actually means and what the barriers to achieving it are. The review isn’t published yet, but I’ll summarise some key points which may be helpful.

What is transformation – and why is this relevant?

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change defines transformational adaptation as changing the fundamental attributes of a system in response to climate and its effects, so it’s easy to see the link with the situation we’re in: the system of cultural production and consumption needs to respond to a fundamental change in the environment we’re working in. Transformation is often described as ‘doing different things’ as opposed to ‘doing things differently’. There is also a common theme of moving from incremental adaptation, where effectively you change only as much as is necessary to keep things stable, i.e. doing the same things differently, to transformational adaptation, where you make bigger changes to the fundamentals, i.e. changing the system and doing different things.

Of course, doing different things is riskier and a greater step into the unknown, but it does also provide the opportunity to do better things. We know that the current system of cultural production is rife with inequalities in terms of who creates the work, who attends or benefits from it, the power structures and systems it represents and replicates.

In Scotland, it is (I generalise) largely white, older, educated and wealthy people who consume much of the subsidised arts and culture that we produce and those who produce it and work in the industry tend to be from the same demographic – except that often they are younger, female and ill-paid. (Hmm. Notice any links with the pandemic?) Why would we change the system simply in order to replicate the problems of the current one? The Scottish Government has adopted the Sustainable Development Goals and integrated them into its National Performance Framework. Maybe if we are going to ‘do different things’ we can genuinely address questions of social and environmental sustainability by shaping the new system differently. (This aligns with Creative Scotland’s focus on Equalities and Climate Change in its connecting themes, which I understand are increasingly important to the agency’s current funding review.)

What are the barriers to transformation?

The review also identifies some common barriers to adaptation. They fall into three categories:

  • Economic and financial: These might include the availability of finance to plan and make any changes as well as the risk that the changes simply make the organisational plan and budget unworkable. We might want to do better things, but the additional costs might make our work too expensive for audiences or other purchasers.
  • Policy, institutional and governance: Funding policy or agreements might not align with a changed approach (I experienced this at Contact in Manchester when I was told that the drama department of Arts Council North West wouldn’t fund a youth arts centre, which was effectively what I was proposing. That later changed, but not until the theatre had burned down and I had left!). Governance issues might apply when existing decision-making processes aren’t able to handle radically new ideas or ways of working that may involve different groups, cross-cutting themes or competing priorities. (Another problem I experienced at Contact, which interestingly now has young people operating at board level and participating in key decisions.)
  • Social and cultural: Emotional, cultural, psychological and cognitive factors can shape decision making and hinder change both in individuals and groups, such as boards or staff teams. Change is difficult and worrying, particularly when the potential changes are high risk or radical. Our habits may make change harder to achieve. We may be reluctant to cede more power to other people or to focus on different audiences that are not like us.

These aren’t all completely relevant here but are useful to consider. And crucially, uncertainty about the future underlies them all: should we spend money on something that may happen more slowly or not at all? What if the policy- and rule-makers don’t make the relevant changes, or move in a different direction? And we, our boards, staff members and audiences will almost inevitably find change more difficult if we aren’t certain about the need: maybe everything will be back to normal by September!

Interestingly, the literature review notes that sometimes barriers to incremental adaptation are themselves triggers to more fundamental transformation. Because it’s difficult to make the small changes necessary to maintain the status quo, particularly in a given time period, more radical change may become necessary, more possible or even more attractive.

Lessons for the cultural sector

As I indicated above, some of the lessons from the world of transformational adaptation echo my personal experience and could be useful for cultural policymakers and organisations, and maybe also for individual artists and freelancers. Addressing each of the barriers leads me to suggest the following, particularly for the boards of our cultural organisations and our policymakers:

  • Financial: It isn’t going to be enough to simply cushion ourselves sufficiently to get through the next few months or even years. We may well need to explore different financial and organisational models for a different world. These will surely involve different ways of bringing cultural work to the public, particularly digital ones, but this itself may not be sufficient. We need to be cleverer and think differently, perhaps radically re-imagining what it is that we do, what we are for: cultural organisations are social ones too. This applies as much to individuals as to companies, and funders and policymakers may need to rethink their support mechanisms accordingly.
  • Policy and governance: Building on this, are the boards of our cultural organisations stocked with the right people to do this clever thinking, with the right information and experience to hand? Contact solved some of its problems after the devastating fire by genuinely involving young people in its governance – it’s now thriving in a way that seemed impossible under the previous board (the chair for much of my time at the young-people focused theatre was 76…). Now’s a good time to think about who we will need to help steer and take responsibility for the long-term sustainability of our cultural organisations in this different future.
  • Social and cultural: Habits die hard and change is challenging. We may need help in changing our thinking, not just doing the usual sort of ‘revisioning’ and post-it note exercises, but addressing the emotional and cognitive biases that we all have. Funnily enough, artists (in the broadest sense) are quite good at helping with this. Let’s get them in (and pay them for their work).

Those who know me know that I call myself a long-term pessimist but a short-term optimist. I know that ultimately I’m doomed, but I wake up every morning thinking that I’ll do what I can today to make the world a better place. COVID-19 presents us with enormous problems, but we’re trying at Creative Carbon Scotland to find the opportunities in this situation: how can what we learn from the pandemic be applied to our work on climate change, and how can the necessary changes make the cultural sector a better, fairer one?


Image by Magda Ehlers from Pexels via Canva.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

A Building for Your Community

A Building for your Community is a free online series of information.

A Building for your Community is a free online series of shared information, ideas, questions and answers surrounding community-led built asset development. The series is designed for community members, groups and organisations looking to learn how to best approach the transformation and improvement of community-led buildings and other built assets.

Beginning April 16th 2020.

– Week one: A Building for Your Community
– Week two: Where’s the money? Navigating funding, ownership and asset transfer
– Week three: Do you speak architect? Translating your community’s needs into an architectural brief
– Week four: From Community to Client

Sign up on the “A Building for Your Community” web page.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

New films from VeloCommunities embedded artist project released!

During this year’s Earth Day Week, we’re excited to share five short films created during the VeloCommunities embedded artist project – celebrating inspiring stories of community-led action on climate change in Glasgow.

Last year we supported theatre-maker Lewis Hetherington and filmmaker Geraldine Heaney to work with Glasgow cycling charity Bike for Good and produce a film about VeloCommunities. VeloCommunities was the 1000th project to receive funding support from the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund.

During Climate Week 2019, we launched ‘Let’s Go! A film about cycling and climate change’, sharing the stories of the amazing staff, volunteers and participants (as well as the artists themselves), involved in breaking down barriers to cycling in Glasgow’s Southside and inspiring community-led action on climate change.

‘Spokes People’ films

The artists have now produced a series of short films, telling the stories of five individuals’ cycling journeys, from what inspired them to get started to the different benefits they derive from choosing to go by bike.

Domestic transport makes up nearly 30% of Scotland’s total carbon emissions, with road transport accounting for 73% of total transport emissions.* Therefore, it is vital that our cities and rural environments support more sustainable options such as walking and cycling as well as public transport.

These films show that climate action is not only good for the planet, it brings multiple positive benefits to society, including tackling social inequalities, improving physical and mental health, and building more sustainable communities. We hope you enjoy them!

‘Spokes People’ from Geraldine Heaney on Vimeo.

The full length version of ‘Let’s Go!’ can be enjoyed on the Keep Scotland Beautiful YouTube channel.

Find out more about the VeloCommunities embedded artists project.


*Scottish Government Climate Change Plan Third Report Proposals Policies 2018

This embedded artist project is part of Bike for Good’s VeloCommunities Project, which is funded by the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund.

Please get in touch with Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT Producer Gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com if you wish to find out more about this project or more about other projects that support collaborations between artists and environmental initiatives.

The post New films from VeloCommunities embedded artist project released! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

New project announcement: Velocommunities 1000th Climate Challenge Fund project        New project announcement: Velocommunities 1000th Climate Challenge Fund project 1

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: micro-residencies for visual artists

TONIC ARTS, part of Edinburgh and Lothians Health Foundation, seeks seven visual artists for a unique series of micro-residency opportunities in response to COVID-19.

TONIC ARTS is a vibrant, award-winning programme that creatively enhances the healthcare environment of NHS Lothian, UK.

They are currently seeking visual artists to create new work documenting observations, experiences, reflections and insights of living through the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.

This opportunity is open to Scottish visual artists, across all ages and stages of careers.

Deadline: 10am, Monday 1st June

Residencies will run from June through to August.

Visit the TONIC ARTS website for the full brief and application form.

The post Opportunity: micro-residencies for visual artists appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Call for environmentalists, artists, campaigners, and creatives

We’re looking for proposals for creative online events connecting the arts and environmentalism to be run during social distancing as part of our Green Tease programme. These events would be micro-funded by and organised in collaboration with us, Creative Carbon Scotland.  

Green Tease is a community and events programme organised by Creative Carbon Scotland exploring interactions between environmentalism and the arts. Since the outbreak of coronavirus Green Tease has moved online with monthly meetups, a Facebook group, and a database of practitioners. We’ve also held online meetings about COP26 and climate justice.  

Now we’re looking to hold further online events between June and September that: 

1) engage with the current situation and its implications for the climate movement and the arts. Examples of this might include: 

  • Imagining what a just and green recovery from coronavirus might look like  
  • Creative digital engagement techniques for continuing environmental activism under social distancing 
  • The role of the arts in care and wellbeing 
  • What the environmental movement can learn from the response to coronavirus 

2) make artistic or creative use of online events formats. Examples of this might include: 

  • Collective art making 
  • Interactive workshops 
  • Thinking or visioning exercises  
  • Creative or non-standard ways of using online platforms or resources  

These events should be free, open to people from both arts and environment backgrounds, and as accessible and environmentally sustainable as possible in design. Based on experience and feedback we normally run Green Tease events on weekday evenings for around 2 hours, but there is a lot of flexibility here depending on what you want to achieve.  

If you have an idea for an online event that you would like to run, please get in touch with lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com. There is no formal application procedure, rather we’re keen to hear your initial thoughts and develop ideas together collaboratively. The nature of the collaboration is flexible. You may have a fully-fledged plan and need help with publicity or a small amount of funding, or you may have a great idea for an event have no time or resources to organise it. Either of these or anything in between are welcome.  

If you have any further questions, feel free to get in touch.  

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico