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Green Tease Reflections: Climate Justice in Arts and Culture

25th February 2020: For this ‘micro-Green Tease’ we gathered together representatives from Scottish arts organisations to get their thoughts on Climate Justice: what it is, why it matters, what the cultural sector can do to embody and promote it. The discussion is summarised below but work on this is still ongoing so do please get in touch if you have thoughts of your own.

Introduction

Lewis kicked off the discussion by throwing out some examples of campaigns that appear to engage with issues of climate justice:

  • Save Our Straws: a disability rights campaign aimed at getting Starbucks to reverse their ban on plastic straws. The ban was instituted on the grounds that it would reduce disposable plastic waste but campaigners argued that people with certain disabilities need those straws and that an outright ban on them would be discriminatory.
  • Black Lives Matter protested against the expansion of London City Airport on the grounds that it would lead to more climate change causing emissions and that people of colour are on average more adversely affected by climate change impacts. They also drew connections to increased local air pollution in the area, which has a high proportion of people of colour, well above the UK average. Their slogan was, ‘Climate Crisis is a Racist Crisis’
  • The Pacific Climate Warriors: a grass roots anti-climate change campaign based across multiple Pacific island nations, drawing attention to their situation as among the first to suffer the effects of rising sea levels, while seeking to brand themselves as being at the forefront of climate action rather than as passive victims.
  • Protests at the British Museum drew connections between its sponsorship by fossil fuel company BP and the museum collections containing objects taken from cultures around the world, many during Britain’s colonial past. The campaigners argued that by helping ‘artwash’ BP’s image they were promoting a form of climate colonialism by legitimising its activities that would lead to climate change, the effects of which are most strongly felt in Britain’s ex-colonies.

He also drew attention to the long history of climate justice and how long it has taken for us to engage with it. He showed images of the 2002 Bali Principles of Climate Justice adopted at the Earth Summit in Bali, which were in turn based on the 1991 Principles of Environmental Justice, drafted at the First National People of Culture Environmental Summit, Washington DC.

Defining Climate Justice

In pairs we then attempted to define the term climate justice and consider where we are most likely to encounter issues of climate justice living in Scotland and working in arts organisations.

Our definitions of Climate Justice shared an emphasis on disproportionate impacts of climate change falling on already disadvantaged people, exacerbating existing inequalities. We also raised the importance of taking responsibility for the large contributions the UK has made to global emissions and sharing the burdens (and potential opportunities) of climate change. It was widely agreed important to put the emphasis on the collective rather than the individual and to develop a reasonably objective framework.

Some other useful definitions and examples are also available on the GCU Centre for Climate Justice website.

Discussions of particularly Scottish climate justice issues repeatedly raised:

  • Migration and climate refugees
  • Urban-rural divides and remote communities
  • A ‘just transition‘ away from the oil industry
  • Understanding the global impact of local work. Seeing everything through ‘globe tinted spectacles’, as one participant put it.

Discussions of relevance to arts and culture organisations raised:

  • What we produce: can we provide a ‘voice for the voiceless’, build awareness, challenge ideas, offer a space for discourse, contribute to a paradigm shift?
  • How we run ourselves: can we practise what we preach in the way we run our organisations, collaborate with social justice organisations? How can we deal with the connection between arts and culture and privilege?
Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion

Following this, Helen Trew of Creative Scotland contributed by drawing some useful connections between climate justice and existing Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion policy. She pointed out that, like climate justice, EDI is not just relevant to arts organisations and thus forces us to consider our position as part of a wider purpose. She discussed how, like climate change, the protected characteristics involved in EDI apply to all of us, but not to the same extent: ‘Treating everyone the same does not result in equality’. Similarly, although climate change will affect all of us, it will affect everyone in different ways and to different extents, which climate justice recognises. She also suggested that climate justice and EDI share the issue that, while it’s easy to see the value from a broad perspective, it can be more difficult to see what you can or should do within your own immediate context, which takes detailed examination and thought.

What can we do?

In the final discussion section, we started trying to think about how we as arts organisations can:

  • Embody climate justice by running ourselves in a climate just manner
  • Promote climate justice through our programming and how we engage with audiences

Suggestions from the discussion included:

  • Both programming and staffing should be diverse and representative.
  • Fully engaging with climate justice requires getting buy in from directors, managers, and board members.
  • Climate justice provides opportunities for positive framing, showing how responding to climate change is also an opportunity to make our society more just.
  • Climate action should be promoted as something that everyone can get involved in.
  • Embedding artists and arts organisations more deeply in local communities would reduce travel emissions and enable more active engagement with local social justice issues.
  • Advocating for changes in how the cultural sector works should form part of work in climate justice.

The next steps will involve refining this broad discussion into more specific advice on how climate justice can form a part of how arts organisations run. If you have any thoughts that you would like to contribute, please get in touch with lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Representatives were present at this event from:

  • Beyond Borders Festival
  • Birds of Paradise
  • Creative Carbon Scotland
  • Creative Scotland
  • Film Access Scotland
  • Glasgow Women’s Library
  • Just Festival
  • Lung Ha Theatre Company
  • Nevis Ensemble
  • North Edinburgh Arts
  • Starcatchers Theatre

Image: Canva

The post Green Tease Reflections: Climate Justice in Arts and Culture appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates

#GreenArts day is the annual online celebration of green arts and culture across Scotland. Each year we spend the day promoting the achievements of Green Arts Initiative members, release the annual report and make available new case studies on work being done by members of the initiative. 

Green arts day is now over for this year, but scroll down to get some highlights of what happened during the day.

#GreenArts Day

Head to our TwitterFacebook, or Instagram to see what’s going on and join the discussion by posting with the hashtag #GreenArts and tagging us. Have you done anything in the past year that you’re particularly proud of? What is the role of arts and culture in creating a more sustainable Scotland?

Stay tuned for live updates on the day here.

Act 1: The Green Arts Initiative

We released our annual report and celebrated the fantastic work being done by the over 200 members of the Green Arts Initiative. Find out more.

#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 2
#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 3

Act 2: Scotland’s Environmental Organisations

We celebrated connections with green, sustainability, and environmental organisations across Scotland and beyond. Read about our partnership with Good Energy or visit the Library of Creative Sustainability.

Act 3: Climate Justice

We believe that tackling the climate emergency is a matter of justice, with the responsibility for and repercussions of climate change being extremely unequally distributed . We believe that arts and culture can play an important tole in embodying and promoting climate justice. Read about a recent Climate Justice Discussion we hosted, or read more about climate justice.

Intermission

Have a read of our six new case studies on work being done by Green Arts Initiative members, released today.

Act 4: Adaptation Hour

It’s not just about taking action to limit climate change. We know that things are already changing and not everything can be stopped, so we also need to start adapting. Visit the Cultural Adaptations Website for loads more advice on this.

Act 5: Looking Ahead

Green Arts Initiative members are full of plans for the future, most importantly thinking about how we can take advantage of the COP26 climate talks coming to Glasgow in November 2020. Read a summary of a discussion event we hosted about this.


Green Arts Initiative Annual Report 2019

Have a read of the newly released annual report.

It gives information about Green Arts Initiative members as well as a thorough survey of what work has taken place over the last year and what members of the initiative are planning for the coming year. Learn what members think are the biggest issues to tackle and how to overcome these challenges. Get information about the make up of the initiative and where members are based. Get inspiration from specific examples and get a sense of overall trends.

Thanks to Boon Studio for this beautiful design work.

#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates
#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 1
Case Studies

Read case studies from members of the Green Arts Initiative giving detailed information on work they have undertaken in the last year.

Highland One World offer insights from their work with local youth groups on creative ways of building understanding of climate refugees.

Fife Contemporary report on their Climate Emergency Day for artists to discuss how to green their work and offer feedback to the Scottish Government.

NEAT Shows discuss their paternship in a plastic-themed community film screening and raffle.

Olive Pearson relates how she embedded zero waste principles into her craft.

Ecologisers lead us through their creative ‘Eco-Santa’ anti-littering campaign for children.

Nevis Ensemble detail their approach to green touring and how they get the whole team engaged in sustainable practice.

The post #GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Using Glasgow’s e-bikes to help the city achieve net zero

Glasgow has set the ambitious target to become the UK’s first Net Zero city, but how it gets there will be significantly different from other big cities across the country.

One way ScottishPower is helping local residents play their part in the fight against climate change is through a new partnership with nextbike to sponsor Glasgow’s first fleet of e-bikes, which will allow Glasgow residents to travel in a quicker and greener way. ScottishPower has sponsored a fleet of 63 e-bikes and 21 charging points across the city.

An increase in the use of electric vehicles will significantly help Glasgow reach its Net Zero goal by 2030. As one of the few cities in the UK with a large proportion of their residents living in flats without access to off-street parking, the challenge of transitioning to electric transport and electric heating creates its own unique requirements.

ScottishPower’s recent Zero Carbon Communities report forecast that the city will need to install more than 175,000 charging points between now and 2030 to reach their target – nearly 17,000 in non-resident areas.

These new e-bikes are a great example of how you can reduce your carbon footprint.

Find out more about Glasgow’s e-bikes.

The post Using Glasgow’s e-bikes to help the city achieve net zero appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Artists wanted for Climate Action art exhibition!

Climate Emergency Scotland is planning an exhibition on the theme : Climate Action…

Climate Emergency Scotland is a newly formed group of volunteers with the goal of spreading awareness and encouraging action regarding the Climate Crisis. We are an offshoot of ELREC (Edinburgh and Lothians Regional Equalities Council) and we are based in Edinburgh.

We want to create an event in May this year where climate change and climate action is at the forefront, and we are looking for local artists to get involved with the project and display their art. If you sell any of your work during the exhibition we welcome a small donation to our cause, but this is not mandatory.

We cannot accept work that requires a screen/projector.

Upcycling and environmentally friendly materials are preferred and encouraged.

How much you want to get involved is up to you! We are a volunteer-run organisation so we are always happy to get more volunteers involved with planning, setup, etc, but we are happy to just get the chance to display your art if that’s all the involvement you are interested in.

If you are interested, please email us at CEMscot@gmail.com

The post Opportunity: Artists wanted for Climate Action art exhibition! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Coronavirus Update

We are aware of the ongoing situation concerning the spread of the covid-19 virus and its potential implications for public events.

In line with current government and NHS recommendations, any public events we are involved in organising will continue as planned and we will be taking reasonable precautions to ensure good levels of hygiene and minimise any risk. We encourage attendees of any events to also take reasonable precautions as suggested by the NHS.We continue our standard practice of improving the accessibility and minimising the carbon emissions of our events by filming or recording at many of them, and recommend taking advantage of these resources going forward should anyone require an alternative to attending in person. We are monitoring the national situation and will make those of you who have signed up to one of our events aware of any changes or updates.

The post Coronavirus Update appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Tease Reflections: Listening to the Anthropocene

This event brought together musicians, geographers and campaigners to discuss the concept of the Anthropocene, the proposed new geological epoch marked by human activity, and the role that music and listening could play as a means of illuminating our understanding of this particular issue and how we as humans interact with the rest of our world.  

Listening Exercise

Emily Doolittle kicked off the event by leading everyone in a listening exercise. We first listened to what we could hear now in our location at Civic House, which sits nearby to both green space and a major road. We then tried to remember a soundscape of the past and noted the things that perhaps we don’t hear now. Suggestions included children playing in the street, the sound of a horse and cart rag and bone man, typewriters, and electric milk floats. Then we were asked to imagine what a future soundscape might be and whether our impulse was to imagine this positively or negatively. Suggestions here included thoughts about no internal combustion engine cars, lots of drones, fewer planes, and maybe more kids playing in safer streets. 

The aim of the exercise was to open up attendees to considering how our sense of place is strongly (albeit usually unconsciously) influenced by how we hear it, as well as how listening can be a way of understanding our world, an alternative to our normal emphasis on the visual. Is the non-directional, diffuse experience of listening a more appropriate way of understanding how our world is shifting than the focused, specific experience of looking? The rest of the event sought to interrogate this issue. 

Presentations from Panellists

Deborah Dixon spoke about how early geologists used poetry, music, visuals, intersecting with the arts in a very different way to how we think of geology now. She further suggested that geology is a ‘field-oriented discipline’ in that tactile and sensory information derived from feeling, hearing and tasting is of vital importance.  

Deborah discussed how, from an earth sciences point of view, there exists a kind of ‘geosemiosis’. History is the signs which are written in the rock strata and can be interpreted. She also argued that we should use the term ‘an Anthropocene’ rather than ‘the Anthropocene’ and noted that there were many different definitions and names for it, depending on people’s point of view, but that all of them tend to miss emphasising the complex human processes that together have force enough to shape the entire Earth system.

How do we look for the sounds of human forcing of the climate? Bioacoustics! Sound and recording can capture biodiversity loss and change as well as variations in the environment in alternative ways. These sounds can intimate an exchange or a loss in the makeup of our world, as well as an indifference, or an obligation. She quoted some examples of discussions of the importance of sound by geologists, such as: 

‘Listen to your footsteps over dry and wet sand beaches. How different those sounds are from the coarse crunch produced while walking on a gravel beach or from the fine crunch of ash while walking up a cinder cone. And both are distinctively different from the clinking sound made while walking on the crushed glass and pumice of an obsidian dome’, Ray Pestrong 2000 

Emily Doolittle then spoke about how she had been interested in birdsong for some years now, and the difference between how humans and animals use and consider and organise sound. 

She noted that birds, in her example the Hermit Thrush, process sound much more quickly than we do, so what sounds like a babble to us has more structure to them – when you slow it down you hear much more detail. But nobody had written about this before as ornithologists and musicians don’t communicate with each other well. 

She noted that some mammals are considered to have ‘song’ as birds do – whales, seals, bats – and that the importance of communication through sound is prevalent throughout the natural world. 

She played some recordings of bird song and then the same slowed down, so that we could hear the detail and then she played an extract of her own composition, which responded to the birdsong. 

Tamara van Strijthem then spoke about Take One Action, a film festival that uses film screenings and discussions as a means of provoking positive social change. The 2019 festival hosted a number of screenings of the documentary film ‘Anthropocene: the human epoch’ alongside talks and discussions.  

She threw out a number of provocations, including ‘How do we communicate about a crisis as fundamental as the one we face?’ and how do we enable people to understand and accept the level of crisis and then seek to change?’, ‘What do we seek, as participants in an arts event that addresses climate change, that other forms don’t offer?’.  

Stuart Macrae spoke about his opera Anthropocene, with the libretto by Louise Welsh. It is set in the Antarctic, where a ship of scientists and researchers becomes stuck in the ice. 

The title was a bit playful. They initially called the ship on which the passengers are stuck ‘The Anthropocene’, seeking to indicate a sense of hubris, but also the sense that it is the humans who have caused the problem of climate breakdown and now they have to deal with it. Gradually the whole opera took on the same title. 

During the process of composition, many people asked him would he use recorded sounds from the Antarctic but he decided no: like the marooned people on board, he’d have to rely on the resources available to him – in his case in the orchestra and the theatre. 

Discussion

This was followed by a question and answer session. There was talk about the need to avoid trying to ‘bridge’ the gap between art and science in collaborations but to rather acknowledge the differences and seek the shared aesthetics. Scientists and artists share more than we think in terms of understandings and curiosity. 

After a break we then broke into four groups, each led by one of the panel members, as follows: 

Stuart focused on the question ‘What role can musicians have in aiding conceptualisation of environmental issues?’. The discussion centred around what skills musicians have to offer that are not found elsewhere in the environmental movement, whether musicians need to have a ‘unique’ role to be useful, and the difficulties in knowing which methods are effective. 

Tamara looked at ‘How can we make sure that artistic work produces real action?’. Responses included: 

  • Shared experience can be used as a means of precipitating a collective response, breaking through the tendency to emphasise individual responsibility. 
  • Artistic work can enable a radical re-imagining, creating new narratives that can contribute to future change.
  • It can enable emotional connection and solidarity.
  • It provides opportunities to acknowledge, process, and explore complex realities and emotions. 

Emily asked ‘How can artists and environmental practitioners forge useful relationships?’. Responses included: 

  • Arts and sciences are equally rigorous, but in different ways. 
  • We need to take the time to develop a shared understanding of the language we use. 
  • In an academic context, needing to frame artistic work as research can inhibitpossibilities. 

And Deborah asked ‘How can music/art go beyond ‘communicating’ about climate change?’. Responses included: 

  • Communication can take different forms through art. It can be embodied or affective.
  • Art can allow interpretation of data as experienced or felt.
  • It can provide a context for ‘slow thought’ on complex subjects.
  • Artistic  approaches can go beyond traditional reality or be speculative.
  • Art can enable ‘aesthetic transduction’, provoking new ways of thinking softly or unobtrusively, getting past defences.

The post Green Tease Reflections: Listening to the Anthropocene appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Zero Waste Scotland and Creative Carbon Scotland seek filmmaker

Zero Waste Scotland and Creative Carbon Scotland are seeking a filmmaker to be embedded within an exciting new initiative addressing how to move towards a lower consumption, circular economy in the context of the climate emergency. 

Zero Waste Scotland has recently formed an independent advisory group whose purpose is to analyse the challenges associated with decoupling our economic and social prosperity from the environmental impacts of resource production, consumption and waste in context of the climate emergency. As part of this Creative Carbon Scotland is seeking a filmmaker to be embedded within the group, following its journey, exploring the complex issues which decoupling raises, and making them visible and engaging to a wider audience.

Deadline for applications: 6pm, Saturday 14th March

This is an exciting, paid opportunity for a filmmaker interested in exploring the complex issues concerning Scotland’s transition away from a high consumption society driven by GDP, to a lower consumption, circular economy. It offers the chance to participate in and contribute to a group comprised of experts from a wide range of fields including environmental economics, social justice, and circular economy, and to support wider engagement with an area of growing importance in global efforts to tackle the climate emergency.

Demystifying Decoupling Advisory Group

Decoupling refers to the ability of an economy to grow or prosper without corresponding increases in energy and resource use and environmental pressures. Decoupling is seen as a central part of the transition to a circular economy. Despite this there is no evidence to show it has been achieved anywhere near the scale needed to deal with environmental breakdown or that it is likely to happen in the future (Decoupling Debunked, The European Environmental Bureau).

An advisory group has therefore been formed to undertake a critical assessment of the viability of decoupling at the rate necessary to address the climate emergency and biodiversity loss crisis. Key challenges which the group will address include:

  • The lack of clarity on what decoupling means for Scotland: what indicators are used, at what scale and over what time period, as well as how it fits into relevant environmental thresholds such as the nine planetary boundaries and policy targets
  • How to overcome the challenges associated with decoupling such as rebound effects and problem shifting (Decoupling Debunked, p.40 – 42)
  • What role decoupling can play in wider societal transition. It is necessary to consider how decoupling is linked to other topics such as the wellbeing economy,the Green New Deal and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and whether it can be pursued to build a fairer and more prosperous society now and for future generations.
  • Key actions or next steps required in order to achieve decoupling

The members of the advisory group will be asked to provide expert advice and input through various formats and their responses will help inform Zero Waste Scotland and the public on how best to tackle the challenges associated with achieving decoupling.

The whole project will run from April 2020 to January 2021.

Filmmaker brief

We are looking for a filmmaker to apply their skills in conceptual thinking and storytelling to document and explore the journey of the group over the course of the project, connecting individuals with their motivations for joining and drawing links to wider societal themes. These could include carbon footprinting and resource consumption, wellbeing and just transition.

As well being an active participant and contributing a different, cultural perspective to the group, a key outcome of the filmmaker’s role will be the production of a short film (approximately 10 minutes in length).

The purpose of the film will be to help make visible the complex issues surrounding decoupling and Scotland’s transition to a lower-consumption society. The target audience will be a wider network of stakeholders engaged in fields including academia, NGOs, industry, public sector, youth and equity, with the aim of building momentum behind the discussion and recommendations made by the advisory group. Social media will be the primary platform for distributing and sharing of the film.

The anticipated time commitment is 14 days over the whole project. This will include:

  • Attending an introductory meeting with Creative Carbon Scotland and project partners
  • Preparing for and participating in four half day advisory group meetings in the central belt:
    • Meeting 1: Friday 24th April
    • Meetings 2, 3 & 4 – Between April and December 2020. Exact dates to be agreed by group at first meeting
  • Participating in regular catch up meetings with Creative Carbon Scotland and partners
  • Leading on the production of the short film with input from key project members
  • Working with the Zero Waste Scotland communications team to produce shareable edits for social media
Filmmaker fee
  • The filmmaker will be paid a total of £4200 for the 14 days’ work. This fee is based on an artist with 5+ years experience in line with the Scottish Artist Union recommended rates of pay.
  • A small materials budget of £250 will also be available.
  • Travel expenses to and from project meetings within the central belt will be covered with a rough travel budget of up to £25 per meeting.
  • The filmmaker will be expected to provide their own film and sound recording and editing equipment and software, and insurance.
Filmmaker specification

The role is envisaged for an experienced filmmaker based in Scotland, looking to use their creative skills and experience to contribute to wider society. We anticipate an individual with 5+ years film-making experience will be most appropriate for the role.

The skills and experience that will be beneficial for this project include:

  • Experience in planning, shooting and editing high quality film content: ability to plan and manage own time and deliver key tasks within budget;
  • Skills in analytical thinking: an interest in and ability to research new topics, work with complex information, and identify underlying questions and issues;
  • Experience in storytelling and narratives: an interest in and ability to bring together diverse forms of knowledge and understanding, and to develop narratives which help make the issues accessible and engaging to wider audiences;
  • Interest in and experience of working collaboratively with diverse groups and in non-arts contexts. For example, regeneration, environmental, educational, social, healthcare contexts;
  • Knowledge of sustainability-related issues, including climate change. 

The filmmaker must be available for the full duration of the project and key event dates as agreed with the project team.

Key dates
  • 6pm, Saturday 14th March – Applications close
  • Thursday 19th March – Interviews held in central Edinburgh
  • Friday 24th April – First advisory group meeting
  • April – December 2020 – Group meetings 2, 3 & 4 held. Exact dates to be agreed by group at first meeting
  • December 2020 – Delivery of short film
How to apply

Please read carefully through the required skills and experience as outlined in the brief to ensure you meet the required experience and abilities.

To apply: complete the online application form

The form will ask you to include:

  • An anonymised CV demonstrating appropriate skills and experience (max 2 pages)
  • An anonymised covering letter (max 2 pages) which makes clear:
    • What it is about the post that caught your interest
    • How your experience and skills match those outlined above
    • How you will contribute to the project aims and tasks
    • Provides details of projects where you have contributed to an interdisciplinary project team including working with non-arts partners to help achieve its aims
  • 2 examples of relevant previous work
  • You will also be asked to confirm completion of the Creative Carbon Scotland Equal Opportunities Monitoring Form.

If you would like to discuss the role or if you have any questions please contact gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Deadline: Applicants should complete the online application form by 6pm on Saturday 14th March

Interviews will take place on Thursday 19th March in central Edinburgh and with shortlisted applicants being notified at the beginning of the week commencing 16th March.

The post Opportunity: Zero Waste Scotland and Creative Carbon Scotland seek filmmaker appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Artful Migration Artist-in-Residence

Upland is seeking to appoint an artist-in-residence for the Artful Migration programme

This new residency is built on the successful pilot that took place at WWT Caerlaverock in 2017-18. This initial residency focused on the whooper swans and their family groups. It is our aim to explore a different migratory bird with each residency. For the 2020 residency, we are delighted to partner with NTS Threave Garden and Estate to enable an artist to research and create work based on the osprey. Read about the 2017/18 Artful Migration pilot project.

The artist-in-residence programme will be hosted at Kelton MainsThreave Nature Reserve (which is part of Threave Garden & Estate) so that the artist can study and record the osprey’s behaviour. The artist will develop a new piece of work based on this research. The residency will be spread over spring and summer (late April to August 2020) to coincide with the female osprey laying her eggs (late April), observe the birds raising their young and then witness the birds leaving the site to return to their wintering grounds, most likely in West Africa.

Work created will be exhibited at Threave Garden visitor centre in August 2020.

Deadline: 5th March 2020 at 5pmFor more information and to apply, please view the PDF from Upland or visit their opportunities page.

(Image credit: Colin Tennant)

The post Opportunity: Artful Migration Artist-in-Residence appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Job: Curator/Producer roles at Fife Contemporary

Vacancies in Curator/Producer roles in two different project by Fife Contemporary.

Fife Contemporary has declared a Climate Emergency and the challenges facing the environment will be at the heart of their forthcoming exhibitions and events programme.

There are two roles available:

Containers Project Curator/Producer

An evolving project centred around shipping containers has included a pilot exhibition using a container and a touring pop-up banner exhibition about shipping containers. Fife Contemporary are seeking to contract a freelance curator/producer to move the project forward by completing a research & development phase.

  • Duration: April – September 2020
  • Fee: £7500 based on 30 days work over 6 months
  • Full job description
Environmental Exhibition Curator/Producer

Fife Contemporary are seeking to contract a freelance curator/producer to devise, develop and deliver an exhibition with us planned for Kirkcaldy Galleries in March-May 2021. The exhibition should involve high quality contemporary visual art and craft and be presented in a way which engages a general audience.

  • Duration: April 2020 – June 2021
  • Fee: £12,500 based on 50 days work over 15 months
  • Full job description
How to apply
  1. Prepare cover letter outlining why you wish to undertake the project and outline your relevant knowledge and experience which would enables you to carry it out.
  2. Enclose a current CV including a referee who we will contact in the event of our offering you the opportunity.
  3. Send to jobs@fcac.co.uk inserting the title of the role into the subject line of the email.

To discuss the project before applying, please contact Fife Contemporary Director:
diana.sykes@fcac.co.uk / 01334 474610

Fife Contemporary  welcome and encourage applications from all sections of the community, and will not discriminate on grounds of race, colour, ethnic or national origins, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or religious beliefs. To help us monitor our performance we will ask you to fill in a confidential monitoring form.

Deadline: Monday 9th March 2020 at 5pm

The post Job: Curator/Producer roles at Fife Contemporary appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Open call for artists living in rural and remote locations

Wanting to make connections beyond your own borders? The Arts Territory Exchange is a selective membership programme for artists living rurally + interested in art + ecology.

Creating a vast global network of connected topographies and reaching to the world’s most isolated places, the Arts Territory Exchange (aTE) facilitates collaboration between artists in remote and wilderness locations such as, islands, deserts, refugee camps, small communities or for those that feel themselves to be ‘remote’ in other ways, cut off from the networks that usually sustain a practice.

Member artists are invited to exchange materials exploring ideas of territory, locality and place; documents from their postal/digital exchanges become part of an interactive living archive and evolving resource. aTE also hosts events, bringing together exchange participants and helping them to realise their collaborations in the form of exhibitions, lectures, publications, ‘face-to-face’ and virtual residencies.

The programme is particularly interested in working with artists who are or have become disconnected from the resources (such as academic institutions, audiences, debate and critique) that often stimulate practice, and in addressing the remoteness—be it due to geography, rural isolation, disability, refugee status, economic disadvantage, parenthood, displacement or disenfranchisement of any kind—that may be a barrier to the conversation and dialogue that nourishes artistic practice.

aTE promotes artists’ work and offers a number of alternative residency opportunities including their ‘Residency by Correspondence’ where artists are paired up with counterparts across the world to make and create work.

Membership applications are open until 10th March 2020 and they are reviewing applications on a rolling basis. Apply here.

Find more information on the aTE website and instagram: @artsterritoryexchange

Membership benefits include:

  • Becoming part of a world-wide network.
  • Having your work included in a permanent collection, the aTE Archive.
  • Automatic inclusion in our ‘Residency by Correspondence’ Programme (with entitlement to re-pairing as and when necessary).
  • The opportunity to have your work selected by interesting independent curators as part of a rolling exhibitions schedule.
  • Opportunity to be included in aTE publications.
  • Opportunity to apply for ‘face to face’ subsidised residency programmes
  • Opportunity to apply for travel and work development funds as and when they are available.
  • An artist profile on our website with links to your website/social media.
  • Promotion of your work in the form of blog articles and social media posts (in consultation with you).

Contact Gudrun@artsterritoryexchange.com with any questions.

The post Opportunity: Open call for artists living in rural and remote locations appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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