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Opportunity: Ice-Themed Writing, Art & Music

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Artists, writers, scientists, travelers, and musicians are invited to submit work that explores ice.

Artists, writers, scientists, travelers, and musicians are invited to submit work that explores ice-related themes to the new art project Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents. We are seeking work that features the physical and spiritual beauty of our world’s ice, explores the life of the people and cultures that are connected to the ice from the Arctic Circle to Antarctica, and addresses important political issues related to ice.

Climate change effects

As climate change affects the weather and composition of our planet, our ice is melting. Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents wants to address the importance of ice; focus on its beauty; and learn from the people who study, live near, and love it.

For literature, please submit only works in English. For other work (visual art or music), please submit an English translation. Artists with selected work will be provided with a $50 (U.S.) honorarium. All payments will be made by PayPal. Recipient must be able to receive payments via PayPal.

Where the work will be published

Accepted works will be published online and in a print version of the publication. Artists will be asked to grant permission for publication with Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents (both online and in print), and will thereafter retain copyright of their work.

Visit Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents for full details and how to apply

Submission deadline: May 31, 2018.



The post Opportunity: Ice-Themed Writing, Art & Music appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Create Development Worker with WHALE Arts

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

WHALE Arts are recruiting for a Development Worker to help address food insecurity and connect people creatively with dignified food provision, skills development and their community, working with the Living Well Wester Hailes partnership. 

Funded by the Aspiring Communities Fund, which is supported by the European Social Fund and Scottish Government, ‘Tasting Change’ is an exciting project that seeks to respond to local priorities and aspirations in order to support community development and empowerment in Wester Hailes, Edinburgh.  To achieve this, the project will develop and deliver sustainable community-led solutions that tackle deprivation levels and inequalities created by food insecurity.

Tasting Change is being delivered through the Living Well Wester Hailes partnership which includes local organisations, GPs and CEC colleagues. The partners in Tasting Change have signed a consortium agreement that lays out how they will work together across a number of integrated project strands including the Create programme which will be delivered by WHALE Arts.

Working with local people, the Tasting Change project team, and other community partners, the Create Development Worker will be responsible for the development and delivery of activities that connect people creatively with dignified food provision, skills development opportunities and their community.

The Create Development Worker will be a key member of both the WHALE Arts staff team and the multi agency Tasting Change project team.  Excellent communication and a collaborative approach will be central to the success of this innovative role which blends creative programming and community development with project management.

Visit the WHALE Arts website for further information and to find out how to apply. 

Applications should arrive at WHALE Arts Agency no later than 12:00 (midday) on Monday 23rd April. Interviews will be held Monday 30th April.


The post Opportunity: Create Development Worker with WHALE Arts appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Green stories short story competition

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Writing a better future: writing competition

Enter a free writing competition to solicit short stories (<3500 words) set within a sustainable society. There are prizes and opportunities for publication, and the deadline is 19th April 2018. Details are on www.greenstories.org.uk.

Why we are doing this

We are currently living beyond our means – if everyone lived as we do in the UK we’d need 3 planets, so the aim of sustainable development is to find ways of living where there is less wasteful distribution of resources. We need to work out ways that we can all have what we need using fewer resources and be just as happy. The necessary societal transformations to sustainable societies require profound systemic changes across social, cultural, economic, environmental, political and technological domains. But to imagine how all aspects can come together within one society is more the domain of creative fiction. Therefore this competition aims to harness the creative visions of writers to imagine sustainable societies.

Why we ask for a positive view

Stories are powerful means of inspiring positive change. The Black Mirror series reflects anxieties about our future, and climate change discourse further creates fear and avoidance. What we really need are some positive visions that allow potentially transformative solutions to be showcased and played out. The difficulty in promoting sustainable behaviours is that they are often seen negatively as ‘doing without’ and the typical fear-based discourse can turn people off. This matters as in turn, political parties tend not to see environmental issues as ‘vote winners’ which limits potential for green policy making.

Just as some books/films product place products, we aim to ‘product place’ sustainable attitudes behaviours products and policies. The story doesn’t have to be specifically about climate change or catastrophic shortages, it can be any kind of genre – rom com, crime drama, legal drama, children’s book, sci fi etc. as long as it showcases sustainable technologies, practices, products or ideas in the background. Or another acceptable approach could be to focus on characters. Currently characters in fiction who are green/ethical are often portrayed as priggish or aggressive, we’d like to see attractive characters behaving in sustainable ways.

Future competitions

This is a small-scale competition just asking for short stories. But the hope is to run a competition on a much larger scale next year, with more formats (film, screenplays, radio plays, tv series, full-length novels etc.) and larger prizes and media involvement. We hope this will create a cultural body of work showcasing sustainable solutions. Entering this competition will not affect entry into the follow-up competition.



The post Opportunity: Green stories short story competition appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

News: A living understanding of nature

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Exploring the space between contemporary art and ecological science to understand our natural world.

An enquiry into the possibility of a contemporary art practice to hone our sensory and intuitive capacity that we might gain an experiential understanding of our natural world. Picking up on Goethe’s plant studies and the desire of the Deep Ecology movement to value all life this short dissertation explores the ability of land art, environmental art, and ecological art to show us nature as it is so that we might experience it with our senses and contemplate our place within it. The focus of this enquiry is on plant growth and the soil that supports it. The document can be accessed at http://artdotearth.org/tina-scopa/and the Artplantae website.



The post News: A living understanding of nature appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

TEDx Talk: Why Culture is the Key to Climate Change

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Arts Project Manager Catriona Patterson was invited to present a TEDx talk at the TEDxUniversityofStrathclyde on February 17 2018. We’re sharing her talk below for World Poetry Day 2018, we’ll share the video once it is available.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the …

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date

Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare

This quote is from Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare: potentially one of the most famous sonnets from one of the most famous writers in the world. Shakespeare calls upon our physical environment to woo his lover…I’d probably be convinced.

However, I’m also a bit of a cynic, and I spend a lot of time thinking about climate change. In the future, ‘summer days’ might not be quite so lovely: climate change predictions for the UK range around hotter and more stifling temperatures, and much more rain. In Scotland, we’re already receiving 27% more rain than we did in the 1960s. The ‘rough winds’ of May he’s talking about? Much more likely to be all year round, and much more extreme. 2011’s ‘Hurricane Bawbag’ doesn’t quite have the same romantic, poetic flair to it, but it might be a more contemporary (and accurate) reference point for those looking to impress me nowadays.

I show this to demonstrate just how ingrained are our culture and our climate, and how often the two are inextricably linked. I’m not here to convince you that climate change is real: we haven’t got time for that (not today, and actually not at all). But I am here to convince you that we can’t just consider issues of climate change to be something confined to scientists and policy makers.

Climate change is happening, and will continue to happen. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (the IPCC, a international collaborative project, which combines the research and knowledge of 800 climate researchers to identify and publish expected trends), has said that:

  • Since the 1950s, the speed of the changes have been unprecedented, with increased temperatures, less snow, and sea levels rising.
  • Many aspects of climate change and associated impacts will continue for centuries, even if anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are stopped tomorrow.
  • The risks of abrupt or irreversible changes increase as the magnitude of the warming increases.


Climate change is a huge physical threat to “the planet” (cute polar bears included), but mostly it’s a huge social, political and cultural threat to humans, to our society and to our way of life: our culture! Culture encompasses everything from our history, our homes, our language, our food, our architecture, our traditions: that which makes us people above all else. My concentration within this is on the arts: the visual, oral, audible manifestation of culture. Otherwise known as: TV, theatre, music, books, film, poetry.

I argue this: climate change is the biggest problem we’ve got, and we need to throw everything at it. The arts are an essential part of that. I’m going to give you a whistle-stop of tour why that’s the case, what’s happening already, and why “all the world’s a stage” should be taken more seriously.

The arts have always been central to how our society grows, shapes and develops, and this should, can and is extending to the biggest single issue of our time: climate change.

Art can show us where we’ve come from, and where we have been: 19th century romantic landscape painting was all about the aesthetics of the sublime – creating a picture-perfect view of rolling hills and dramatic valleys: imagery which we still use to describe the UK internationally. Our societal obsession and expectation of having a white Christmas can basically be traced back to Charles Dickens writing the weather into all of his novels.  Our whole cultural identity has been shaped by the words we read, write and listen to, and by the images and expressions we see reflected back to us from the walls of museums and galleries.

The arts can help us understand how we got here.

Art can explore the alternative realities and futures that we might face under new world conditions. Consider how George Orwell’s 20th century novel 1984 has been the warning and the prediction of the dystopian and tyrannical state which may result from surveillance and censorship. It still informs debates around data protection, net neutrality and the rights of the individual. It may be an extreme example of climate-disaster fiction (yes, it’s a genre!), but Hollywood blockbuster The Day After Tomorrow did play out climate change impacts for the general population. We know that climate change is unlikely to happen quite that quickly, but it put climate change front and centre at the box office.

The arts can help us play out what might happen under different conditions.

Art can reflect our present, and the turmoil we currently face. It helps us make sense of the world around us – and sometimes more subtly than we expect. At the Edinburgh Festival Fringe last year, there were 61 shows about Brexit (including a musical, cabaret, theatre and comedy), helping everyone figure out quite what is going to happen – socially, at least. Skip a few verses into Rabbie Burns’ most famous poem, and you get straight into the existential questions around humans and their impact on the planet:

I’m truly sorry Man’s dominion
Has broken Nature’s social union,
An’ justifies that ill opinion,
Which makes thee startle,
At me, thy poor, earth-born companion,
An’ fellow-mortal!

To a Mouse, Robert Burns

The arts can clarify and crystallise the issues of now.

Art is not merely a passive agent, serving to educate by translating concepts and science and make them more digestible. Art is an active agent of change, and we should consider, recognise and encourage this when we see it.  It’s a total cliche, but I might not be here today, were it not for Al Gore’s climate change documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ and the Scottish Government making it mandatory viewing in all Scottish high schools in the late 2000s.

The arts can catalyse people’s lives.

There are already lots of examples where artists, writers, storytellers and others are explicitly tackling climate change head-on…

…in visual art. 

Jason deCaires Taylor’s ‘The Rising Tide’ combines images of the 4 horsemen of the apocalypse (borrowing from historic cultural references), with the skeletal machinery of the oil industry. The sculptures were flooded twice a day with the ebb and flow of the tide of the Thames – a rise and fall which will become ever the more extreme as sea level rise impacts the capital.

…in literature.

There are novels, essays, short stories and poems dedicated to issues and concepts of climate: an issue where traditional scientific communication has failed, or actually turned people away from an issue that seems too difficult or too distant. Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ – about a  scenario in which environmental concerns have created dystopia – was written in 1985 and adapted into an award-winning TV show. Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland (our Makar) had her climate change poem published in the Guardian alongside 21 others from internationally renowned poets (her poem itself paraphrased another cultural reference point, riffing off The Wizard of Oz but talking about extinction: “No lions, no tigers, no bears!”).

Wizard Of Oz Bears GIF
 
…as figureheads in our culture.

Leonardo DiCaprio: arguably one of the biggest film stars of our time, upon finally receiving an Oscar for best actor, used his speech and his wider celebrity to talk about the urgency of climate change. More people listen to bigger voices.

“I am consumed by this…there isn’t a couple of hours a day where I’m not thinking about it. It’s this slow burn. It’s not ‘aliens invading our planet next week and we have to get up and fight to defend our country,’ but it’s this inevitable thing, and it’s so terrifying.”

…in our homes, through our televisions.

Blue Planet 2 was the most-watched TV programme of 2017, and although not explicitly about climate change, one of the episodes did feature a similarly complex environmental problem: plastic ocean waste. Since the episode has been broadcast:

  • Michael Gove, the UK’s Environment Secretary, said he was ‘haunted’ by the images;
  • Ullapool has banned plastic straws;
  • the Scottish Government has committed to banning plastic cotton buds;
  • hundreds of thousands have people have petitioned the UK government to take action on reducing ocean plastics and,
  • the Prime Minister has announced a 25 year plan to eradicate all plastic waste..

But the thing is…ocean plastic is not news! We’ve known about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch since the mid-1980s, but it’s taken an emotional, artistic and accessible presentation of the impacts to prompt this change to our wider culture. Moral of the story: get ‘national treasure’ David Attenborough to say it on a Sunday night to the great British public, they will take action!

These are just a tiny fraction of the countless examples of how our arts and wider culture are already taking on the mantle of climate change, but it’s still not enough. As audiences, consumers and producers of culture, we need to demand that our culture stares climate change in the face. 

Here are a few way that you can start to make this happen:

We need to celebrate and share examples of great work. It was a book that started the whole environmental movement – Rachel Carson’s 1962 book ‘Silent Spring’ – and both Al Gore and David Attenborough have cited it as influential to their work – but when was the last you heard about a great climate change book? With the advent of social media and ‘shareability of culture’, can you imagine if people recommended climate change art as they do that which focuses on romance or war? Could good climate change art go viral?

We need to challenge narratives that omit climate change. It’s irresponsible to ignore the existence of climate change, and it’s irresponsible to ‘leave it out’ of our current art forms and wider culture. Start asking questions of those art form you engage with:

  • Are there recycling bins in TV mockumentary ‘The Office’?
  • Are those electric cars they are driving Cars 3?
  • Is the protagonist in your crime fiction novel sipping on their black coffee from their re-useable coffee cup?
  • When the next sci-fi film comes out showing ‘the future’, is it a realistic depiction of what life will look like 1.5 degrees warmer?

We need to demand climate change be addressed more. Next time you’re watching a film – perhaps the next Avengers installment (filmed partly in Scotland: a country with some of the most stringent climate change targets in the world), see if, among the superhero technology, the superhero stunts, and the superhero morality…you can spot the concern for a very real threat to our species.

And so. I’d like to end at the beginning; back again with the bard:

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare

Climate change is the biggest problem we are facing as a species.
Culture and the arts are what make us human: they ‘give us life’.
Culture is the key to climate change.



The post TEDx Talk: Why Culture is the Key to Climate Change appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.




Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Going Green Survey 2018

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Sustainable Exhibitions for Museums (SEFM) and Stephen Mellor would like to invite you to complete the on-line Exhibitions – Going Green Survey 2018 – Ten Years On, through the following link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/H87R7GP

SEFM is a UK-based informal network of museum and gallery professionals who want to promote and encourage sustainability in all we do in this field, with a particular focus on the production and staging of exhibitions.

We are looking for survey responses from museums or galleries of any kind – multiple sites may want to submit by each major site. We wish to once again review our industry to assess how environmentally sustainable or ‘green’ our work practices and institutions are, and how our approaches to exhibitions have changed in the last ten years.

To see the results summary of the first survey issued in 2008 follow the following link to the report pdf:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/vixzon7kw9w380f/AABSibWleaxa4KUEXDi3Dwmya?dl=0

All of you willing to take this survey are encouraged to review the 2008 report as this will also give you a good overview of and preparation for this follow-up survey before you start.

This 2018 Survey is based on the original 2008 Survey so we can analyse ‘like for like’. We recognise though we may have advanced quite some way since then and that the questions/topics may have been overtaken by progress.

Most questions are ‘green’ and a few new ones ‘financial’ as we are taking this opportunity to see how universally tight budgets have affected exhibition programming and museum operations – perhaps with green benefits.

The actual survey will take roughly 30 minutes but you may need extra time to gather information. You can stop and start until finally selecting the ‘Submit’ button.

The survey will close on Sunday 30 September 2018 at midnight GMT.

The results from this 2018 survey will be added to and compared with the previous 2008 data we have collected and will be shared in November 2018. All respondents will be sent the survey analysis report by email in due course.

We understand how pressured your work-time is, so thank you in advance for your input. If you have any enquiries or questions about the survey, please email:stephen.mellor@chalkface.net.au

Please forward this invitation and links to any contacts you have and who you think might be interested in taking the survey – we want to share/connect as widely as possible across the world and join up the many green initiatives, supporters and enthusiasts that are already ‘green exhibitions’ advocates.

Stephen Mellor, formerly Exhibitions Co-ordinator at Tate Modern, London and a committee member of the International Exhibition Organisers group, is managing this 2018 survey in association with Sustainable Exhibitions for Museums (SEFM).

This survey is a volunteer initiative and any views or information are offered in good faith.



The post Opportunity: Complete the Exhibitions – Going Green Survey 2018 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Embedded Artists Project – Green Tease Reflection

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Carbon Scotland co-hosted a sharing event on Tuesday 6 March with North Edinburgh Arts and Chris Fremantle. This Green Tease explored Embedded Artists Projects and discussed work placements undertaken by Edinburgh University Students at Creative Carbon Scotland and North Edinburgh Arts. Our work placement, Elly White, now shares some final reflections at the end of her time with Creative Carbon Scotland.

From January – March 2018 Elly White, Abbie McGunnigle and Gabi Gillott, students from the Edinburgh College of Art, explored different approaches to socially engaged arts practices and embedded artist models, where artists are engaged for extended periods in community or organisational settings to contribute to wider environmental and social aims.

Research Presentation  

Embedded Artists Project - Green Tease Reflection

Elly White presenting at North Edinburgh Arts

My work placement has been at Creative Carbon Scotland (CCS) where I have been researching for the culture/SHIFT project, which explores how cultural and creative perspectives can contribute towards greater environmental sustainability. I have investigated local and international embedded artist projects including historical and current examples. This research will contribute to the longer-term development of an online Library of Practice for building and sharing knowledge. Keep an eye on the CCS website for more info soon!

After introductions from Gemma Lawrence, Producer at CCS and Kate Wimpress, Director at North Edinburgh Arts (NEA), I began my presentation by sharing historical case studies, these included:

I then situated these with current examples:

A short discussion took place after my presentation with questions around the feasibility aspects of embedded artists projects such as the eighteen months seen with Artist Placement Groups placement of Roger Coward within the Department of Environment. Whether this was too long or it is an integral aspect for a success project. Another contributor mentioned how it was interesting to see examples of art engaging people who may not normally be interested, such as Jenny Kendler’s work involving the local community in the dispersal of Milkweed seeds.

Zine Workshop

After this short discussion, it was now time to hear from the placement students at North Edinburgh Arts, a member of the Green Arts Initiative. Abbie McGunnigle and Gabi Gillott began sharing how they had mainly  been participating in workshops and engaging socially with local communities. Zines became their chosen output for the placement, after Edinburgh College students Epoch 8. held a zine-making workshop. Abbie and Gabi felt that the making and reading of zines was a less invasive way of inviting people into a conversation, only requiring low cost, recycled materials and a starting idea to get going Their placement resulted in the proposition for a Zine library shelf in the café at North Edinburgh Arts, for everyone for access and contribute towards.

We broke into small groups for the workshop where we were given instructions how to create a six page zine from one piece of A4 paper. We then worked in groups to create ‘exquisite corpse’ style zines where we each posed a question on the front cover of our zines, then passed it onto the person next to us to respond. These were passed around until the zine was finished. We had two minutes to fill in a page so this was a great opportunity for the Green Tease participants to reflect and respond in a quick manner to the information that had been discussed so far.

Group Discussion

Following the presentation and workshop we got back together as a group. Chris Fremantle encouraged us to get into pairs to contemplate and generate questions as we reflected upon the information shared during the Green Tease.

Here is a short summary of those reflections:

  • How do we move beyond artists as engagement tools for councils and other contexts, rather than having an artist fix engagement problem, how do we embed creative approaches within wider strategy?
  • The potential difference between working with communities and organisations, in terms of working at a grassroots level and spanning to more top-down models and how to navigate this through an arts approach –
  • Does this mean outcomes are already set within an organisation?
  • Does it become social work or remain within artistic terms?
  • Is the line between social work and art practice dependant on who funds and generates embedded artists projects such as charities or non-government organisations?
  • Building legitimacy, does there need to be a gatekeeper within the organisation to stand up for the embedded artist?
  • The need to be have a sense of fluidity– different style of placements- some may be more collaboration-based indicating adaption needed for different types of projects
  • Reflexivity– for the sustainability and longevity of project as it may reach a terminal point. Environments of the community may change creating a need to be sensitive and open to this change
  • Length of Embedded Artists Projects, with long term and permanent seen as favourable rather than temporary in order for the opportunity to make a real difference
  • What do artists do differently compared to other sectors and disciplines such as community developers or architects, is it because of the aesthetic process and result art brings and would this change the outcome if it was not a visual artist embedded?

The sharing event was incredibly useful for future considerations into the Library of Practice. Future case study research should cover more art practice types rather than just those with visual outcomes. The length of embedded artist projects was another aspect discussed throughout the Green Tease.  As the library is being developed it would be interesting to follow the progress of current placement case studies.

Thanks to all who participated and contributed to the event, especially to North Edinburgh Arts for hosting this Green Tease.


Green Tease is an ongoing informal events programme connecting cultural practices and environmental sustainability across Scotland. Find out more about our Green Tease Open Call and previous events.

 



The post Embedded Artists Project – Green Tease Reflection appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Reduce business energy costs and receive up to £10k

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Take out an unsecured Scottish Government SME Loan to pay for upgrades and receive 30% cashback

By making energy efficiency improvements most businesses can save on average around £8,000 each year. Over five years that’s a whopping £40,000. Or, if you prefer to think in percentages, you could cut your energy consumption by a quarter – 25%.

Upgrading your lighting and heating systems can dramatically reduce your business’s energy bills. Take out a 0% unsecured loan from the Scottish Government to pay for upgrades and you’ll receive 30% cashback!

For a limited time only, eligible small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) applying for an interest-free, unsecured Scottish Government SME Loan can receive 30% cashback up to a maximum value of £10,000.

Top reasons to take out the SME Loan, today
• Don’t miss out on the 30% cashback – funds are limited.
• Tackle rising energy costs by reducing your energy consumption, and running your business more cost-effectively.
• Run a more sustainable business by reducing your carbon footprint.
• Protect your profits by investing in energy efficiency equipment today, reducing your outgoings and reaping the rewards for years to come.
• Savings on overheads can be reinvested in the business for future growth and improved market resilience.

What your business can do with the SME Loan
Here are just a few examples of energy efficiency projects that are eligible for SME Loan funding;
• investing in LED lighting
• installing more efficient heating systems
• improving the insulation of a building
• Investing in more energy efficient equipment, such as a state of the art oven or a more efficient refrigeration unit
As lighting can be 20% of an energy bill and heating nearer 50%, then it’s no wonder that these are the most popular projects. And logically, before investing in heating a building, it’s better to make sure it’s not ‘leaky’ but improving insulation.

Contact Resource Efficient Scotland to help you with your loan application
Don’t miss out. The Resource Efficient Scotland advisors have already supported organisations in Scotland to identify over £42 million worth of savings and have supported over 300 loan applications to date. Contact the team today for your report (needed for your application) and help with your loan process by calling 0808 808 2268, emailing enquiries@resourceefficientscotland.com or going online for more information.



The post Opportunity: Reduce your business energy costs and receive up to £10k cashback with a Government SME Loan appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Commission: Outdoor Sculptures

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Two artists will be assigned a commission: one artist will come from the Midlothian area and one from the City of Edinburgh.

Salary/fee: Up to £35,000 per sculpture (including artist fees, engineer fees, public engagement activities, design, materials, fabrication and installation).

General description of the project: A high quality 3km active travel path has been created along a disused railway line. Two locations have been selected for artistic sculptures.

The commission: Both sculptures will be visible from the road and will become iconic beacons to the path. They will be exciting, reflecting local history and heritage where possible with an opportunity to create elements of ‘play’ with the sculptures. We are, therefore, seeking skilled and experienced public artists. We are particularly seeking artists who have experience in building large external sculptures. The sculptures will be of a very high standard with very robust designs requiring minimal maintenance.

Details of the design commission: As part of this commission the chosen artists will engage with local communities to influence the direction of the design. The build and installation are part of the commission.

Aims of the commission:
• The overall aim is to encourage active travel and use of the path
• To add to the experience of path users
• Reflect the local environment, history and landscape
• Enhance the identity and personality of the path

Artists are asked to express an interest in the project at this stage by submitting information as detailed below.

The Commissioner: The artwork will be commissioned by Sustrans Scotland.

Appointment procedure: If you would like to be considered for this commission please send the following:

• A CV
• At least 5 images of your work/previous projects
• An artist’s statement and an ‘expression of interest’ in this project detailing the appeal of this commission to you (no more than one side of A4)
• Your full contact details
• Response to the above time scale and budget
• Details of two references you would be happy for us to get in touch with

After shortlisting, selected artists will be invited for interview at the Sustrans office in Haymarket, Edinburgh in April (tbc)

To request a copy of the full artist brief or any further information please contact Cosmo Blake at cosmo.blake@sustrans.org.uk

Deadline submission date: 17:00 Monday 26th March 2018

The post Opportunity: Commission for two unique outdoor sculptures in the South of Edinburgh and Midlothian appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: CGTrader Digital Art Competition

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

CGTrader has just launched the Digital Art Competition with prizes worth more than $60,000.

CGTrader, one of the leading 3D model marketplaces in the world with over 1.2 million users, has started the Digital Art Competition, which welcomes all CG artists (both 2D and 3D)!

Upload up to three works to each of the available six categories: Character Illustration, Character Concept Design, Environment Illustration, Environment Concept Design, Object Design, and Object Concept Design. All submissions will also have the opportunity to achieve the Public Award nomination.

There are no entry fees, and artworks do not have to be created exclusively for the competition, so feel free to show everyone your best and favorite works. For more details, visit the competition page and be sure to check out the Categories & Prizes section!



The post Opportunity: CGTrader Digital Art Competition appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland