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The Green Arts Conference

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Save the Date!

We are pleased to announce that The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability will take place on Wednesday 1st November 2017, this year at Partick Burgh Hall in Glasgow. Creative Carbon Scotland will be hosting a full day of discussion on how and why the cultural sector is creatively approaching environmental sustainability.

Building on the success of  50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector (2015)and 51 Shades of Green: Action in the Arts (2016), this year’s conference will highlight and share the innovative steps the sector is taking to reducing its enviornmental impact, and challenge how the arts can contribute to a more sustainable Scotland.

Whether you’re a Green Arts Initiative member, a Regularly Funded Organisation working towards Creative Scotland’s ‘Environment’ Connecting Theme, an arts venue keen to find out what your peers are doing, an arts company who has been working on sustainability for years, or just coming to sustainability in the sector for the first time, there will be something for you!

To register your interest and share your ideas, please find our event page here. By registering you will be the first to hear when tickets become available for the event.

If you have any further questions, please contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com.

 



The post The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Stalled Spaces Glasgow

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Local groups & organisations across Glasgow are invited to submit proposals for temporary activation of stalled or underused open spaces in the city. Funding of up to £4,500 available.

Have an idea for the temporary activation and improvement of a stalled or underused open site in Glasgow?

With Stalled Spaces there is an opportunity to bring value to the activation of derelict spaces in the city through the use of arts, design, and cultural activity; creating connections between people and spaces and creating social, economic, environmental and cultural value in order to build more resilient communities for everyone.

Stalled Spaces are particularly interested in projects that:
• are imaginative in the processes employed to have the desired impact;
• contribute to the development of artistic practice, particularly where that involves working with site and community;
• demonstrate a clear and considered approach to public engagement which will create an effective dynamic between the artist(s), the community and the site involved.

For more information, and to submit an application, go to the Stalled Spaces website.

Closing Date for applications: Friday 18 August 2017

Image credit: Rollmo Design, Alex Reece

 



The post Opportunity: Stalled Spaces Glasgow appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: Carbon Management Tool Trial

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

More arts organisations than ever are measuring their carbon footprint and many Green Champions are keen to find ways to make reductions in emissions. With so much data available we are developing a better understanding of how the creative sector produces emissions. We are now working on ways to support organisations to develop Carbon Management Plans to proactively avoid emissions on their next projects.

As part of this support we are developing a customised tool which will allow cultural organisations to track their current carbon footprint and to examine opportunities to reduce it. We want to make the tool useful and easy to use so we are asking for help to trial the tool during this development phase.

We will be holding a session for around 5 potential users to come along and provide feedback and suggestions for improvement. The session will take place during August in at our office in Waverley Court in Edinburgh.

If you are interested in helping us with the project, please contact fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Deadline July 27 2017.

 



The post Participants Sought for Carbon Management Tool Trial appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: SURF’s Community Regeneration Award

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Apply now for SURF’s annual awards recognising Best Practice in Community Regeneration – categories are Creative, Community Led, Most Improved Place, Housing and Youth Employment.

SURF’s annual awards process is delivered in partnership with the Scottish Government. It is open to all community regeneration projects in Scotland which are currently in place or have been completed within two years of the closing date. Our friends at The Stove won the award for Best Creative Regeneration Project in Scotland, in SURF’s 2016 awards.

This year’s categories are: Community Led Regeneration; Creative Regeneration; Scotland’s Most Improved Place; Youth Employment: Overcoming Barriers; and Housing.

The purpose of the SURF Awards is:

  • To recognise and reward best practice and innovation in community regeneration;
  • To promote and disseminate best practice across Scotland as means of sharing knowledge and experience, and thereby enhancing future policy and practice;
  • To highlight the role that regeneration projects have in improving the wellbeing of individuals and communities.

The closing date for applications is 5pm on Monday 18 September.

To enter this year’s Awards, please visit the SURF website.

Please note that projects can only be entered into one category.

 

The post Opportunity: SURF’s Best Practice in Community Regeneration Award appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

 

Image credit: © SURF – Scotland’s Regeneration Forum

Opportunity: £10,000 Community Engagement Pioneer Project

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Applications are now open for Adaptation Scotland’s new community engagement pioneer project.

Support and funding of up to £10,000 is being offered for one Community Engagement Pioneer Project to be developed and run as part of the Adaptation Scotland programme between September 2017 – March 2018.

This opportunity is open to all organisations and community groups based in Scotland. This includes public, private and third sector organisations and community groups based around particular locations and/ or interests.

Why apply?

Climate change is already beginning to affect communities across Scotland. Summers are becoming hotter and drier, winters are becoming wetter and milder, and our growing season is getting longer. By working together, we can help communities take account of these changes and ensure the places where we all live, work and play are climate ready. Pioneer projects provide a unique space for collaboration, enabling partners to develop a shared understanding of adaptation challenges and opportunities, and develop tools, resources and actions to address these.

Deadline for applications is Friday 11 August 2017.

For more information, and to download the application form, please visit the Adaptation Scotland website or email adaptationscotland@sniffer.org.uk

Image credit: Sniffer, 2016



The post Opportunity: Adaptation Scotland’s £10,000 Community Engagement Pioneer Project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Nithraid Associate Artist

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Through this project, The Stove are seeking an individual that would be able to offer guidance and support in construction and provide creative input in designing a staging area made from reclaimed boat timber for musical acts to perform on during the festival.

The Stove are looking for an individual to work on this project who will take into account the needs and theme of the festival alongside the ethos of Blueprint100, who can incorporate furher ideas of sustainability and nautical history into their work.

The deadline for applications 30th of June. 

Find more details about conditions and how to apply here


As part of the annual riverside festival and procession Nithraid, Blueprint100, an artists group for under thirties are building a community arts project that will combine visual art and the idea of using reclaimed materials to tie in with the nautical theme of the festival. Nithraid will take place on the 9th of September 2017, with construction days taking place on 14th-20th of August.



The post Opportunity: Nithraid Associate Artist appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: £10,000 Environment Now Challenge

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

If you have got an idea to help the environment, such as improving energy efficiency, reducing waste or increasing recycling, and you are aged between 17 and 24, then you could apply for up to £10,000 from The Environment Now to bring your idea to life!

The Environment Now is an exciting new opportunity from O2’s Think Big that will fund 17-24 years old with a grant of up to £10,000 to create their unique digital ideas to help the environment, such as improving energy efficiency, reducing waste, or recycling. Successful applicants will be supported by The Environment Now team, their own professional mentor and other sustainability partners.

This programme is open to all young people aged 17-24 UK wide. They would have 10 months to use the grant funding.

Applications for funding are open until July 14th. Go to The Environment Now website to read the full criteria and apply.

The Environment Now programme is funded by O2 and the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund, and is part of the Our Bright Future programme. It is managed by the National Youth Agency.

 



The post Opportunity: £10,000 Grant from The Environment Now appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Ben’s Strategy Blog: Carbon Management Planning for cultural SMEs

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

With a new Climate Change Act requiring greater carbon emissions reductions, CCS will introduce carbon management planning for cultural SMEs to help them play their part

Back in 2011 we were laying the groundwork for Creative Carbon Scotland. The late and sorely missed Euan Turner and I were running carbon management workshops for 10-15 theatre, dance and music organisations, members of the Federation of Scottish Theatre. Julie’s Bicycle had been doing similar work in England for a while. I had already been supporting the Edinburgh Festivals for a few months, but we hadn’t quite got to carbon management yet. With the FST group we started with carbon counting as the first step to carbon reduction, although of course within the discussion there was always a lot of sharing of experience and tips about how to reduce.

Good news on carbon reporting

Six years on, 117 organisations receiving Regular Funding from Creative Scotland have reported on their greenhouse gas emissions for 2015/16 using a consistent approach – around 90 organisations did so voluntarily for 204/15 and about 40 the year before. You can read the report here, hot off the press! And we’ve produced this infographic with the key information.

The quality of the data is getting better and better. This is particularly so for travel, which for many cultural SMEs is the major source of emissions and is difficult to track as, unlike utilities, the messy data comes from everything from expenses claims to invoices to petty cash and is provided by everyone from freelancers to travel agents.

(Our own tool Claimexpenses.com is the solution: it replaces any paper based expenses claim system, can be used by the most irregular freelancer and tracks the carbon accurately in the background then collates it nicely for the poor soul who previously was sweating over endless lever arch files.)

The amount of carbon produced by these smaller organisations isn’t so great, but if we are going to get to the Paris Agreement’s carbon neutral (or indeed carbon negative: see Kevin Anderson) position by 2050, then it isn’t just the big emitters that are going to matter: we’re all going to have to work hard to minimise that carbon.

Next step: carbon management plans

So we’re suggesting that, even for cultural SMEs, the next step is carbon management planning. Essentially this means asking everyone to look forward to their future carbon footprint not just back at emissions they have already produced. Can we plan to avoid our most carbon intensive behaviours, find better ways to get the job done?  Can we use our knowledge to prevent unnecessary carbon emissions before they happen? We think the answer is ‘Yes’.

Regular Funding and Open Project Funding

In April around 180 organisations submitted applications to Creative Scotland for funding for the period 2018-21. These applications will include fairly detailed plans for their activity for those three years. Many of the successful applicants will have reported on their carbon emissions for the period 2015-18, so they’ll know their main sources of emissions. In other words they will have the basic information necessary for a decent carbon management plan.

And those arts organisations that apply for funding from Creative Scotland’s Open Project Fund also know their plans. Although they may not know their previous emissions, they can use tools like our tenants’ energy toolbox or the Julie’s Bicycle ig tools to work out where their main emissions sources will be, as their projects will be similar to others’.

How carbon management planning works

A column for ‘carbon cost estimates’ can be included alongside financial cost estimates in production planning, with estimates based on previous measurements and experience since, for most organisations, their future activities will bear some resemblance to their past, where emissions are known. This will enable them to identify a few specific areas where they can take action to reduce their carbon emissions from their ‘business as usual’ scenario. The Albert tool, run by a consortium led by BAFTA, does something similar for screen production projects.

We’re therefore encouraging cultural SMEs to use their knowledge to develop plans to reduce carbon, focussing on the areas of their work with the most significant emissions, and where realistic action can be taken. The three-year period for the new cohort of Regular Funded Organisations will be especially useful, as it allows for some expenditure up front if necessary to get payback over the longer term. There is time to plan, implement and monitor the results to find out what works and learn from the experience. But for shorter projects there are fairly straightforward decisions to make. We’ll provide training, tools and comprehensive support from this autumn onwards, just as we did when mandatory carbon reporting was introduced for Regular Funded Organisations.

A cultural shift

Euan Turner’s main job was Health and Safety Advisor for the FST. In that role his great achievement was turning  H&S from a tedious compliance issue into a set of values, skills and knowledge that would enable cultural organisations and their staff to do their work more effectively.

Our work on Carbon Management Planning is based on the idea that understanding and managing their carbon emissions will help cultural SMEs improve their operations to make them more efficient, will strengthen their reputations as climate change moves up the agenda, and will align with the qualities that make them trusted and valued by their staff, artists and audiences. In all sorts of ways it will make them better organisations.

I don’t know but I have an idea that there are few sectors where the majority of micro, small and medium-sized businesses are accurately measuring their carbon emissions and developing coherent plans to reduce them. I’m proud that the cultural sector in Scotland has taken the first steps so effectively, joining our Green Arts Initiative and working together to develop and share good practice.

In 2017 there will be a new Climate Change Act for Scotland which will increase the ambition and reach of Scotland’s climate change action. The cultural sector’s work demonstrates what can be done by everyone to help achieve those aims. And Euan, who helped us set out on this journey, would be thrilled.

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: Carbon Management Planning for cultural SMEs appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Carbon Reporting: Understanding Sector Impact

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Scotland’s arts, screen and creative industries show increased levels of confidence in carbon reporting and embracing of environmental responsibilities, a new report published by Creative Carbon Scotland today reveals.

Since 2014, environmental data – including carbon emissions associated with travel, energy and waste – has been submitted as part of the annual reporting process for Creative Scotland’s Regularly Funded Organisations, becoming a compulsory requirement in 2015 –16.

Over the three years for which reports have been submitted the quality of the data provided has improved substantially, reflecting increasing environmental confidence and carbon literacy in the sector.

In 2015 – 16, significantly more organisations submitted carbon emissions information, with 117 reporting compared to the previous year’s figure of 90 and a 31% increase in the amount of data reported.

This increase in reporting has also increased the overall reported carbon footprint from 8,000 tonnes CO2e in 2014-15 to 14,500 tonnes CO2e in 2015-16. This isn’t because there was a sudden rise in carbon emissions, but because of better and more confident reporting by the larger number of organisations. Such a rise is comparable with other sectors which have introduced carbon reporting and is likely to continue until reporting is well-established.

In particular, the reporting process gathered more data in 2015-16 and more of the data was based on actual recorded figures rather than estimates. As a result the figures from the reporting can be considered more accurate and relevant for identifying areas where future carbon reductions can best be achieved.

Theatres reported the largest overall emissions figures, with around 8000 tonnes of CO2e, comparing with 4000 tonnes from Art Centres and 2300 from organisations who rent their working spaces.

73% of the data from theatres were actual figures, while from art centres and tenants 64% and 46% respectively were actual. As tenants often have little or no involvement in the payment of utilities, reporting inevitably becomes more estimate-based and reporting rates are lower.

Ben Twist, Director of Creative Carbon Scotland said:

“It’s very encouraging to see the increasing sophistication, consistency and engagement of cultural organisations in reporting their carbon emissions. In particular, the increase in overall data submitted, and the proportion of data derived from actual rather than estimated figures, highlights the commitment these organisations have to their sustainability goals. With better and more detailed information we can make better decisions on how best to help Scotland’s cultural community continue their hard work in this area.”

Kenneth Fowler, Director of Communications at Creative Scotland added:

“Creative Scotland welcome this report from Creative Carbon Scotland and we thank all the organisations who have contributed to it by recording and submitting their data. It’s great to see that, as a cultural sector, we are taking our carbon reduction responsibilities seriously and this report is testament to that. It also enables us all to make informed decisions about how we operate in the future, so we can continue to minimise and reduce our environmental impact and be as environmentally sustainable as possible across the arts, screen and creative industries.”

This year’s data will help the sector move on to stage two of the programme when Creative Carbon Scotland will be helping organisations with Carbon Management Planning to reduce emissions relating to their future projects. CCS will continue to support RFOs to improve reporting levels and to make the most of the information gathered to benefit their organisations and sustainability ambitions.

The full version of the 2015 – 16 report is available to download here.

Press Release for Carbon Reporting 2015 – 16 is available to download here.


Creative Carbon Scotland provides year-round training and support on carbon reporting to Scotland’s arts, screen and creative industries. For more information visit our Carbon Reporting page or our Carbon Reducthttp://www.creativecarbonscotland.com/rfo-carbon-reporting-2015-16/Fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.comion Project Manager directly at Fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com

 



The post Better Carbon Reporting Leads to Better Understanding of our Sector’s Impact appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Deep Adaptation Call Out

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Deep Adaptation Call Out

The NewBridge Project is looking to hear from artists, activists and collectives interested in collaborative projects that engage with ideas and themes connected to the Deep Adaptation agenda.

In the last forty years, the global economy has grown by 380%. During the same period, the number of people in poverty has increased by 1.1 billion. This widely accepted culture of ‘consumption’ directly impacts the climate, causes huge household debts and a breakdown in social care networks, facilitates time poor lifestyles and zero hour working contracts, creates a reliance on food banks and allows a rise in domestic violence and homophobic attacks: is this kind of ‘growth’ really something we value?

In response to this context the deep adaptation agenda involves resilience, relinquishment and restoration:

Resilience involves people and communities better coping with disruptions. What are the tools we need to do this?

Relinquishment involves people and communities letting go of certain assets, behaviors and beliefs where retaining them could make matters worse. How do we let go?

Restoration involves people and communities rediscovering attitudes and approaches to life and organization that require less management, or increased community-level productivity and support. How do we re-build?

Information:

The NewBridge Project is interested in hearing from artists, activists, researchers and collectives interested in producing new commissions and projects that engage with ideas of resilience, relinquishment and restoration and the Deep Adaptation agenda.

The project will be supporting 5 new commissions of up to £5000 each, and are asking for an expression of interest outlining your initial ideas.

Deadline for expression of interest: 27 June, 5pm

Click here for full details of the call out and how to apply.


The NewBridge Project is a triple award winning artist-led community supporting the development of artists and curators through the provision of space for creative practice, curatorial opportunities and an ambitious artist-led programme of exhibitions, commissions and events. The project aims to deliver an outstanding programme of exhibitions, performances, screenings, educational talks and workshops in consultation with artist members, creating a programme responsive to the socio, political and civic environment within which it exists and seeks to be a genuine community resource. Read more here.

Image Credit: The NewBridge Project.



The post Opportunity: Deep Adaptation Call Out appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland