Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: The Art of Energy

The Art of Energy competition at the University of St Andrews

Envisioning life with energy | Art competition

How would you artistically conceptualise our current energy predicament where we need to balance energy demand with concern about human-driven climate change? How can we make sense of the entanglement of life with energy in the past, present and future?

It is our pleasure to invite you to take part in the Art of Energy competition at the University of St Andrews. We seek submissions on the topic of energy that engage creatively with the following challenge:

Global energy demand continues to rise. To meet this demand energy producers are increasingly relying on innovative methods of harvesting energy from fossil fuels, nuclear and renewable sources. At the same time, public concern about the impact of anthropogenic climate change is growing, alongside tense conflicts over the human and environmental impact of energy production, distribution, consumption and waste-handling. Recognising that this energy predicament has no simple answer, this predicament raises fundamental questions about what we consider to be right or good, and the kinds of energy futures we envision for ourselves, our communities, and future generations around the world.

We are seeking art submissions of any of the following kinds:
  • Visual arts (e.g. sound installations, video, filmmaking, photography, printmaking, drawing, painting, ceramics, mixed media)
  • Spoken word submissions (e.g. poems)
  • Short essays (700-800 words)

There will be cash prizes for the top three finalists across categories: £500, £200, £100.

All participants will have their work exhibited at the Byre, St Andrews, on 1 April 2020. Finalists will have their work also exhibited at the Energy Ethics 2020 symposium on 2 April 2020 in Parliament Hall, St Andrews.

The three finalists will also be invited to attend an invitation-only dinner on 2 April with the symposium’s special guests. We hope you will join us. All Art of Energy participants are warmly invited to also attend the symposium.

The deadline for registering AND submitting is 20 March 2020.

Register here to participate

Submissions must either be emailed to energyethics2020@st-andrews.ac.uk or delivered to:

Lisa Neilson
Department of Social Anthropology
University of St Andrews
71 North Street
St Andrews, KY16 9AL

Please contact the organisers Anna Rauter and Dr Sean Field at energyethics2020@st-andrews.ac.uk with any questions.

The post Opportunity: The Art of Energy appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Island Going 2020 – Outer Hebrides residency

Island Going is an ocean- and island-based creative residency based in the Outer Hebrides

In partnership with Ocean Guides* and building on the success of three previous land- and sea-based residencies for An Lanntair within an established residency programme, this Summer’s ‘Island Going’ residency runs for 11 days – six days at sea and five days on land, for five participants, offering the potential to explore the ocean and island environments of the Outer Hebrides, including the St. Kilda archipelago.

In addition to this our residencies come with an ethos of supporting the communities that they are based in, utilising local knowledge, services and expertise as well as providing a window into the language and culture of the islands.

We aim to benefit those communities and foster links between them and the wider world, building a greater understanding of island living and the challenges that the people and the ecosystems of the Outer Hebrides and other island Nations face in the Anthropocene – such as climate changeeconomic sustainability and cultural and linguistic identity.

Key to our residency programme is an acknowledgment of the rich Gaelic culture of the islands and the role local ‘indigenous’ knowledge plays in the understanding of the past – and how that informs the present. This is embodied in the George Macleod book Muir is Tir/Land and Sea – on which the residency is loosely based.

The vessel for the voyage, Ocean Search will be the accommodation and means of transport for the voyage, offering the opportunity to sail under the expert guidance of the skipper and crew Andrew and Meg Rodger, owners of Ocean Guides as well as the chance to use her scientific kit, which includes a hydrophone for listening to and recording cetaceans, underwater cameras for observing the seabed to 40m, sidescan sonar to search for underwater features such as reefs or wrecks, and a seabed grab sampler.

The first part of the residency will be spent on Ocean Search exploring the coastline and islands of the St. Kilda archipelago and the Sound of Harris. The second part of the residency will be based on land staying at John’s Bunkhouse on the fascinating island of Berneray, located part way between the Isle of Harris and North Uist, where participants will have time to reflect on the ocean-based time, develop ideas from the voyage, and/or undertake further research and creative exploration on the island with the support of An Lanntair’s Project Curator – Jon Macleod.

Costs + what the residency provides

£1400 – this includes:

  • Six days boat charter, skipper and crew, food on board the boat
  • Five days accommodation at John’s Bunkhouse on the island of Berneray
  • Creative support to help facilitate projects and discuss ideas during the residency
  • Curatorial support towards developing residency work further
  • Guidance and support on the land based part of the residency
  • Collection and drop off at airport or ferry terminals
  • Exhibition opportunities at An Lanntair – in discussion with curatorial staff
  • The opportunity to develop ideas further in a Residency Journal format
  • A residency library of selected titles and suggested reading list

In the past the residency has often proved a dynamic research arena for collaborative practice, the nature of the experience proving rewarding for the cross-fertilisation of ideas.

Application details

The residency is open to International and UU-based artists and is multidisciplinary in its approach – places have been offered to writers, dancers, filmmakers etc. in the past.

Please send a 300-word statement outlining your intent for the residency + a 500 summary of your practice. Please provide examples of previous works in jpeg format (8 max) and/or website/blog/vimeo etc. to jon@lanntair.com.

Closing date: 14th February 2020

Successful applicants will be informed by 21st February

Find further information on Island Going 2020 or An Lanntair’s residency page.

*Visit the Ocean Guides website

** We can offer letters of support for selected participants applying for grants for the residency.

The post Opportunity: Island Going 2020 – Outer Hebrides residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Green Arts Annual Feedback Form

If you are a member of the Green Arts Initiative, then it’s time to complete the annual feedback form.

This lets us know what you think about our work, what you’ve been doing, and what you think our collective plans for the future should be. It only takes 15 minutes to complete, is vital for our work, and you could win prizes contributed by environmental artists.

You can complete the survey on Survey Monkey.

The post Green Arts Annual Feedback Form appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Blog: Embedded artist processes – learnings from Swedish arts agency, TILLT

Back in November we travelled (for over 66 hours by train, bus and ferry) to Gothenburg, Sweden, to take part in the second transnational meeting of Cultural Adaptations, a cross-European project exploring how culture can be part of the transformational change required to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

In this blog Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT Producer, Gemma Lawrence, shares some key learnings from Swedish cultural partners, TILLT, from their 17 years’ experience of running projects addressing societal issues with artists playing a key role as creative change makers.

TILLT’s roots go back more than 100 years when the theatre company Skådebanan was founded in Stockholm in 1910. Since then the organisation has evolved to focus on creating a society where art contributes to human growth, leading to a better, more creative and sustainable society.

TILLT supports this vision by creating projects where artists and organisations collaborate to develop creative processes around key topics including leadership, innovation, values and diversity. Their work is also guided by important societal issues such as diversity and integration, elderly care and climate change. TILLT believe that artists have a special role to play in these situations by creating space to say new things, have new thoughts and bring new mindsets to challenging and complex issues.

Key project phases

On the second day of the transnational meeting, Maria Mebius-Schröder, TILLT’s Project and Process Manager, presented the key stages of setting up such collaborations. This was pertinent to Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT programme and Cultural Adaptations, which involves four new collaborations between artists and climate adaptation projects across the partner cities in DublinGlasgowGhent, and Gothenburg. Maria outlined the key project phases:

Phase 0: Project anchoring

  • Needs analysis jointly led by the process manager and commissioning organisation
  • Assignment of the project group, e.g. ambassadors from the commissioning organisation who will act as advocates for the project
  • Communication of the role of creative approaches brought through the artistic process led by the process manager
  • Agreement of the working culture of the project with the commissioning organisation
  • Artist recruitment led by the process manager

Phase 1: Research and development of project scope

  • Research, participant interviews and observation undertaken by the artist with project participants
  • Relationships and trust built between artist and commissioning organisation
  • Development of an action plan by artist and commissioning organisation

Phase 2: Project delivery

  • Project kick-off and communication of action plan including opening event with key partners
  • Delivery of action plan
  • Regular meetings between the project group, artist and process manager to check up on progress, arising problems etc.

Phase 3: Evaluation of the project and results

  • Evaluation of project outcomes led by process manager
  • Web survey undertaken by participants
  • Discussion of future plans and opportunities for future collaboration

Although not included in the project phases, we also discussed pre-Phase 0 – project financing – which can be a lengthy process to secure the funds for both the artist and TILLT’s involvement in the project.

Embedded artist meeting
Embedded artist project meeting, Day 2

Key learnings

Building trust

TILLT were open about the failures they have experienced in setting up new types of collaboration between arts and non-arts partners, which have played an important role in shaping their currently project methodology. For example, they identified that they left too much up to the commissioner and artist in earlier projects, and now place greater emphasis on the role of the process manager in building trust and overseeing the process. The process manager can bring additional benefits including increasing the scope and ambition of projects, but also adds to the overall cost, so their role needs to be communicated and understood. This is something that we have learnt in our culture/SHIFT programme, where we now play a stronger role as a contributor throughout projects, not just in the setting up stages.

Maintaining artistic freedom

Maria also emphasised the importance of maintaining the space for artistic freedom, which can sometimes feel in tension with the aim of meeting an end goal or outcome. TILLT is very clear that they do not get involved in steering the artistic process, and the anchoring phase is key to creating the right conditions for the artist to bring their different way of thinking and working to shape the project. In their recruitment process, TILLT focus less on artform and more on the mindset and what they describe as the “driving forces” behind the artist’s work.

Cultural Adaptations partners meet with Björn Siesjö, Gothenburg City Architect
Cultural Adaptations partners meet with Björn Siesjö, Gothenburg City Architect, Day 3

The rest of our time in Gothenburg included site visits and meetings with other actors engaged in making Gothenburg a more sustainable and climate resilient city including Kokokaka, a design studio based in an industrial warehouse in the port of Hisingen Island, and Björn Siesjö, Gothenburg City Architect. On the third day of the meeting TILLT hosted a day of presentations and workshops at the Museum of World Culture. This included Pecha Kucha style talks from each of the city embedded artist projects and a Climate & Creativity workshop where new ideas ideas for projecgs were developed between local adaptation stakeholders and international partners addressing key climate-related issues.

We’re very grateful to TILLT for such a rich and interesting three days of learning, discussion and exchange. We’re certainly taking a lot away from the meeting to apply to Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT programme, including the importance of building enough time at the start of projects for everyone to be clear of the aims and the commissioning organisation to be able to embrace the new approaches brought by the artist, and the value that the process manager can add at this stage.

You can learn more about Cultural Adaptations on the project website and our recent blog for Transform at Creative Europe.

(Top image: Cultural Adaptations project partners)


Cultural Adaptations (EUCAN) is co-funded with the support of the Creative Europe programme of the European Union and the Scottish Government.

The post Blog: Embedded artist processes – learnings from Swedish arts agency, TILLT appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Contemporary Art Commissioning

We are looking for consultancy to manage the delivery of two contemporary art commissions.

Historic Environment Scotland wishes to bring contemporary art to some of the country’s most atmospheric places. With properties from the Borders to Shetland and from Brochs to Mills, we care for an eclectic range of sites that tell the story of Scotland and the people who have lived here.

With a busy exhibition programme managed by a small team, we are looking for consultancy to manage the delivery of two contemporary art commissions. Both commissions should be temporary and able to tour to at least two Historic Scotland properties.

The consultancy should cover:
  • Preparation of the artist brief in consultation with the exhibition team
  • Artist call out and management of queries and submissions
  • Support of the longlisting and shortlisting process with relevant HES staff
  • Management and funding of shortlisted artists drawing up detailed proposals
  • Management of interviewing and appointment of artists with relevant HES staff
  • Commissioning costs, to include artist fees, materials, transport and install
  • Project management of development and production of final artwork, supporting the artists and liaising with the exhibition team
Key aims of the project
  • Provide a platform for new creative responses to Scotland’s heritage
  • Engage new visitors in our sites and work
  • Celebrate Scotland’s heritage
  • Challenge people’s perspectives of Historic Scotland
Timeline
  • Respond to tender: 3rd February 2020
  • Initial briefing meeting: w/c 17th February 2020
  • Appointment of artist: May/June 2020
  • Installation of final artworks: May 2021
Responding to this invitation

In order to tender for the project, you will need to be registered on the Public Contract Scotland Tender website.

Your submission on QuickQuote should:

  1. Confirm you are able to deliver the work to the timetable
  2. Confirm the cost, divided into:
    a. Consultancy fees for artist shortlisting process
    b. Artist fees for developing proposals
    c. Consultancy fees for project management and delivery of final artworks
    d. Commissioning costs of final artworks, including artist fees, materials, installation
  3. Please provide information and samples of relevant previous work, particularly where it includes working with historic venues. Scores will be weighted in favour of relevant experience.

For further information, please contact Claire Whitbread.

The post Opportunity: Contemporary Art Commissioning appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Open Call: Sunny Art Prize 2020

The Sunny Art Prize is an international art prize hosted by Sunny Art Centre, London.

This fine art competition, based in the UK, is a global platform offering art opportunities for emerging and established artists to showcase their artworks internationally. The exhibiting galleries are located in cities across the world, including London, Beijing and Shanghai.

The art contest also gives the art prize-winners the opportunity to be part of a one-month artist residency. The Artist Residency Programme is organised in collaboration with established Chinese art institutions and it provides the chance to engage with historically and culturally rich places in China.

Application deadline: 30/06/2020

First Prize
• £3,000
• A public solo exhibition in London
• A group exhibition in London
• A one-month residency in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
• A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

Second Prize
• £2,000
• A group exhibition in London
• A one-month residency in China, (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
• A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

Third Prize
• £1,000
• A group exhibition in London
• A one-month residency in China, (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)
• A group show in China (either in Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou)

The prize winners will be joined by 27 shortlisted artists in a group exhibition at the Sunny Art Centre, London. From these 27, seven artists will be selected to exhibit their works at one of our partners’ galleries in China along with the three prize winners.

Accepted media
Submissions are accepted from every country in the world and are all equally judged. Please note that you must be at least 18 years old to enter the competition.
Entries may include:
• Painting
• Sculpture
• Photography
• Ceramic
• Original Prints
• Installation Art
• Mixed Media (both wall-hung and three-dimensional)
• Video Art (Including moving image, projected work, and digital installations)
• Drawing

Size restrictions
All 2D work such as painting, drawing, projected videos (including moving images and installation) must be 120 x 120cm in size (maximum).

All three-dimensional work, including sculptures, ceramics, and mixed media artworks, must be 80 x 80 x 80cm in size (maximum). Installation art (whether made of mixed media or digital) must be assembled on site at the exhibiting location and can reach 100 x 100 x 100cm (maximum).

What do we look for?
We wish to find artists who are engaging with pressing contemporary issues.
Winners of previous editions did so by raising awareness of global issues and themes ranging from climate change, the current international debate regarding immigration and refugees to our perception of identity, gender, and much more.

Visit the competition website for more information.

The post Open Call: Sunny Art Prize 2020 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Call to Artists – RSA Annual Exhibition 2020

Online submissions are now open for the 2020 RSA Annual exhibition.

Works of any scale and in any fine art medium are accepted. After the success of its re-introduction in 2019, the Open Art element will return next year as a vital component of the RSA Annual Exhibition.

To submit work to be considered for the exhibition artists must register and complete the online application process.

Artists may submit up to TWO works of any dimensions in any fine art medium, including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, film, installation and performance.

An entry fee (inclusive of VAT) is required for each work: £15 per work / Students £10 per work.

There is also a £10 hanging fee for any work hung in the exhibition, payable in cash on hand-in days. Any works not included in the final selection will be refunded this admin fee.

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 12 February 2020 at 5pm.

Please read the REGULATIONS & FAQs in full before completing your application.

KEY DATES

  • Online registration deadline: Wednesday 12 February 2020 at 5pm
  • Pre-selection announced: Friday 21 February 2020, from 11am
  • Hand-in of works: Saturday 14 March 2020, 10am – 4.30pm
  • Final selection announced: Thursday 19 March 2020, from 11am
  • Collect unselected works: Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 March 2020, 10am – 4.30pm
  • Opening reception: evening of Friday 27 March 2020 (invite only)
  • Exhibition open to public: Saturday 28 March – Sunday 3 May 2020
  • Collect unsold work: Friday 8 and Saturday 9 May 2020, 10am – 4.30pm

The post Opportunity: Call to Artists – RSA Annual Exhibition 2020 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Call to Architects – RSA Annual Exhibition 2020

Online submissions are now open for the 2020 RSA Annual Exhibition.

Works of any scale and in any suitable architectural medium, including models, architectural drawings, photography and film/animations are accepted. The Open Architecture element aims to showcase some of the most interesting architectural practices from across Scotland and beyond.

HOW TO ENTER
To submit work to be considered for the exhibition, architects must register and complete the online application process.

Architects may submit up to TWO works in any suitable medium, including models, architectural drawings, photography and film/animations.

An entry fee (inclusive of VAT) is required for each work: £25 per work / students £10 per work.

There is also a £10 hanging fee for any work hung in the exhibition, payable in cash on hand-in days. Any works not included in the final selection will be refunded this admin fee.

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday 12 February 2020 at 5pm.

Please read the REGULATIONS & FAQs in full before completing your application.

KEY DATES

  • Online registration deadline: Wednesday 12 February 2020 at 5pm
  • Pre-selection announced: Friday 21 February 2020, from 11am
  • Hand-in of works: Saturday 14 March 2020, 10am – 4.30pm
  • Final selection announced: Thursday 19 March 2020, from 11am
  • Collect unselected works: Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 March 2020, 10am – 4.30pm
  • Opening reception: evening of Friday 27 March 2020 (invite only)
  • Exhibition open to public: Saturday 28 March – Sunday 3 May 2020
  • Collect unsold work: Friday 8 and Saturday 9 May 2020, 10am – 4.30pm

The post Opportunity: Call to Architects – RSA Annual Exhibition 2020 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Are you switched on to “Renewable Energy Month”?

Make switching to renewable energy your New Year’s Resolution.

Here at Creative Carbon Scotland, we believe ethically-sourced* renewable energy is one of the best ways in which our arts and wider society can begin to shape a cleaner, greener future. That’s why, with some help from our energy partner, Good Energy, and other trustworthy sources like the Energy Saving Trust, we’ll be talking about renewable energy throughout January 2020.

Our aim during Renewable Energy Month is to provide some useful information, facts and figures and to answer some burning questions on the topic to help you (and your creative business / organisation) decide to make the switch. For example:

  • What is renewable energy?
  • What is greenwashing?
  • How does the weather affect renewable energy supply?
  • Why should you or your cultural organisation switch to renewable energy?
What’s your responsibility?

There is a global climate crisis.

Everyone, individually, has a responsibility to reduce their carbon footprint. There are lots of ways to do this and every change, small or big, makes a difference: invest in a reusable cup (and take it everywhere!), eat a more plant-based diet, insulate your home, use public transport, cycle or walk instead of driving, fly less or not at all, and contribute to reducing the country’s reliance on fossil fuels by switching to renewable energy.

Pressure to act

Scotland has ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions – 75% by 2030 and net-zero by 2045.[1] Glasgow and Edinburgh have even higher targets with both city’s councils declaring they will become carbon neutral by 2030.

Soon, Scotland’s arts, cultural and heritage organisations will feel the pressure of these targets and need to act, if they haven’t already. They also have a responsibility to use their unique position in society to act as a role model; sourcing genuine renewable energy for theatres, galleries, museums etc. demonstrates commitment to sustainability and sends a positive and influential message to staff, contractors, visitors and audiences.

Such organisations will not only reduce their carbon footprint, they’ll be at the forefront of driving investment in new and existing renewable projects too. This, in turn, may attract like-minded sponsors or partners with the potential to contribute to the ongoing success and long-term sustainability of the organisation.

Leading the charge

The good news is that Scotland is leading the charge when it comes to renewable energy and is on track to achieve 100% renewable electricity in 2020.[2]

In the UK, as a whole, “only around 3% of our electricity comes from coal today”[3] and “between January and May 2019, Britain generated more power from clean energy than from fossil fuels for the first time since the Industrial Revolution.”[4] This means it’s now easier to find authentic* suppliers of green energy, like our sponsor, Good Energy and helpful ways for organisations to make the switch, such as the Creative Energy Project.

Are you ready to make renewable energy your New Year’s Resolution?

Follow #RenewableEnergyMonth on social media to get the full story.

You can also contact Helen Franks at Good Energy if you would like further information or to request a quote for your organisation’s switch to 100% renewable electricity and carbon-neutral gas – not nuclear and not greenwashed.

m: 07791 399352

e: Helen.Franks@goodenergy.co.uk


Below are some useful links to further information and we’ll add to these as Renewable Energy Month progresses:

*Some suppliers claim their energy comes from renewable sources when it really doesn’t. This is greenwashing.

The post Are you switched on to “Renewable Energy Month”? appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Blog: Round-up of emissions and carbon reporting 2019

This year, we at Creative Carbon Scotland have once again been supporting 121 Creative Scotland Regularly Funded Organisations (RFOs) to fulfil the environmental requirements of their funding. With the recently declared Climate Emergency and net zero emissions targets, our work has never been so topical.

New this year!

2019 has been the first year we have worked with organisations receiving funding from the City of Edinburgh Council’s Culture Fund to support them in their first year of creating carbon management plans, which are now required by their funding. It’s been great to welcome these organisations on board and help them think through the specific challenges they face.

Last year, all of the RFOs were asked to develop a three-year plan to manage and, ideally, reduce their carbon emissions and this year we used an online survey to ask them to give us an update on how their plans were progressing. We also collected the annual emissions data (from utilities, water, waste and travel) for last year (2018-19), which all RFOs have been required to record and report since 2016.

Having access to emissions data at the same time as information about carbon management plans meant we could give more detailed and specific feedback, looking at each organisation’s plan to reduce their emissions in the context of their current carbon footprint. Each individual feedback report charted a breakdown of the organisation’s emissions, gave a qualitative evaluation of how their carbon management plan addresses their footprint and evaluated plans on how realistic, relevant, and ambitious they were.

One hundred and fifteen organisations have provided all the information we asked for with only a very small number of organisations still finishing their environmental work for this year. Some organisations have seen less progress than they had hoped for, but a large majority of organisations are on track or exceeding targets in the carbon management plans they put in place in 2018. Most are reducing emissions and almost all have positive stories to tell about more qualitative and structural progress within organisations. All the reporting organisations see their carbon management plans as active documents informing their practices and many of these organisations have been actively contributing to the Green Arts community across Scotland for years, as we have learned during our interactions with Green Champions and colleagues over the past few months.

“The carbon management plan has taken a serious and worrying issue and turned it into a message of hope, empowering staff to feel that our actions can make a significant difference.” RFO, 2019

Interesting facts and figures about emissions reported

Now we’ve been gathering data since 2015, we’re able to build an increasingly clear picture of what emissions look like for Creative Scotland RFOs over the past four years. We classify organisations by type and use the data to help us provide them with appropriate resources and support.

Lots of factors have changed over the years:

  • There are more RFOs collecting and reporting emissions data
  • Organisations are better at collecting data (there are more data and they’re more accurate)
  • More of our electricity is coming from renewable sources so electricity is less carbon intensive, meaning less kgCO2e per kWh of electricity
  • There have been some impressive efforts by larger organisations to reduce gas and electricity use

Despite more organisations reporting that all adds up to a general downward trend in emissions for the whole group in all areas apart from travel. Reducing emissions from flights in particular remains a challenge for everyone in the arts community as we strive to lower our emissions while maintaining the world class nature of what Scotland creates and the global recognition we receive.

colour bar chart

Every organisation has different priorities and does different work – even from year to year, so we don’t spend time comparing them with each other or creating competition. We’re (actually) all learning together, after all. However, it might be interesting to see the average carbon footprint for 2018-19 for each organisation type.

Organisation TypeAverage carbon footprint 2018-19Number of reporting organisations
Theatres286 tonnes CO2e14
Arts Centres65 tonnes CO2e29
Tenants43 tonnes CO2e67
Who’s doing what?

Here are some actions that a number of organisations are taking as part of their Carbon Management Plans

  • Rolling out LED replacements for more efficient lighting
  • Replacing boilers with more efficient models
  • Fitting secondary glazing on windows where double glazing isn’t an option
  • Investment in electric vehicles
  • Not flying for work within the UK (some organisations take this wider to not flying within Europe) and encouraging visitors to do the same

We are also very happy to see a spread of innovative projects engaging with audiences, artists and staff around climate change themes, and dealing with the specific areas some organisations work in.

Paragon Ensemble are about to start on their project ‘Whoosh!’ creating new music inspired by renewable energy, while specifically measuring and minimising the carbon emissions from the project itself.

Scottish Sculpture Workshop are starting their project to examine the sustainability of supply chains for the materials their artists use.

Organisations based at Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) are part of an active and successful Green Team, supporting each other to make lower carbon choices and understand their environmental impact

It has been a busy time for both Creative Carbon Scotland and all the RFOs getting all of this information , collecting, analysing and feeding back on all of the data but we continue to learn and get better at making great art sustainably.  Creative projects like this show us that carbon reduction can be an opportunity rather than a barrier.

Carbon management for all!

For support on your own carbon management, whether you work for an RFO or not, please have a look at our carbon management pages, which describe the process of effective carbon management at any level, and provide a number of useful tools and resources.

The post Blog: Round-up of emissions and carbon reporting 2019 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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