Creative Carbon Scotland

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CCS awarded funding for new environmental performance

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

CCS is one of 14 Edinburgh-based groups to receive support through the City of Edinburgh Council’s new culture fund, running for the first time this year to support of the development of up-and-coming performing work in the Capital City.

The £5000 grant from the fund will support Edinburgh-based actor, clown and theatre-maker Alice Mary Cooper to develop a new performance work Blue Cow in association with Imaginate and Catherine Wheels Theatre Company, as part of CCS’s culture/SHIFT programme.

CCS and Alice have collaborated on a number of projects in the past including our 2015 Arts & Sustainability Residency and ArtCOP Scotland, and more recently exploring community engagement in climate adaptation through the arts in Aberdeen.

Blue Cow will address the question what it means to be ‘contaminated’, evolving from Alice’s passion for environmental issues and desire to make work which helps to shift our wider societal culture towards a more sustainable one.

The new work will contribute to one of CCS’s culture/SHIFT themes – ‘making the invisible visible’ – which seeks to understand how the arts and culture can foster new awareness and understanding of our relationship to the environment and climate change.

Through the Culture Project Fund award, CCS will commission Alice to develop the sonic and video possibilities of Blue Cow, working with award winning Edinburgh based director Caitlin Skinner, Sound and Video Designer Rob Jones and musician and composer Thomas Butler.

CCS will also engage local sustainability practitioners and environmental organisations in the project with the aim of building new understandings of how the arts can contribute to a more sustainable city.

Other award recipients include the Village Pub Theatre, Strange Town and Red Note Ensemble. A full list of 2017/18 Culture Project Fund recipients is available on the City of Edinburgh Council website.

The Culture Project Fund supports the priorities of the city’s new Culture Plan, adopted by the Council last year. The plan was developed through the Desire Lines consultation process with input from creative industries, funding bodies, festivals, performers, artists, producers and venues.

It highlighted a need for greater support of emerging artists and ‘a shared city-wide agenda’ for culture in the Capital, which the Project Fund will help address.

Keep an eye out on CCS news for more information on Blue Cow over the coming months!

 



The post CCS awarded funding for new environmental performance work in Edinburgh appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: PERFORMING LANDSCAPES

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Deadline: 12 noon, Monday 19 June

OPEN CALL
PETER McMASTER’S DIY PROJECT: PERFORMING LANDSCAPES.

APPLY NOW to participate in a four day retreat at SSW this July.

This 5 night and 4 day retreat hosted by SSW is designed to allow participants to engage with eco-centric approaches to performance making. The majority of the work will be conducted outside, enquiring into the potential for the natural landscape to be seen as collaborator in performance making practice. How can we shift the perspective from ourselves to ourselves with ‘other’ when it comes to being an artist? How far can this definition of ‘other’ extend? How can our approach be influenced by the nature of a river system? What can a nesting pair of birds tell us about collaboration, and what do we see of ourselves in all of this?

Participation is free, this includes accommodation and a small travel subsidy can be provided too. Participants will be selected by the artist.

APPLY HERE: http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/diy-14-2017-peter-mcmaster

The deadline for applications is Mon 19 June at 12noon.

DIY 14 is an opportunity for artists to take part in unusual training and professional development projects conceived and run by artists for artists.

All the DIY 14 projects now have open calls for participants, these can be found at: http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/diy-14-2017-call-for-participants



The post Opportunity: Open Call, Peter McMaster’s DIY project: Performing Landscapes appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Social Enterprise Census 2017

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

As part of the Scottish Government’s 10 year Social Enterprise Action Plan, charities and social enterprises are invited to complete the 2017 Social Enterprise Census.

The census helps shape future Action Plans, and is the second such survey (with the first taking place in 2015).

Organisations wishing to take part should be able to answer ‘yes’ to the following questions:

– Does your organisation have social or environmental goals?
– Are you earning income from selling goods, charging for services, or delivering contracts?
– Do you aspire to greater financial independence through earned income (reducing reliance on grants)?
– Do you reinvest your surpluses and retain assets to further your social/environmental goals?
– Are you operating independently (not as a public body)?

The census should take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete.



The post Social Enterprise Census 2017 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Last Call: Assistant Tutor for Our Bright Future project

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Deadline: 12 noon, Wednesday 17th May

Impact Arts is looking for an Assistant Tutor for the Our Bright Future project in Barrhead.

Creative Pathways Environmental Design is funded through the National Lottery by the Big Lottery Fund as part of Our Bright Future programme, www.ourbrightfuture.co.uk

Creative Pathways Environmental Design will introduce young unemployed people with little or no experience of environmental issues to nature, environmental awareness and green skills through practical, creative and fun projects.

As well as building confidence and developing employability skills, the project will provide a lasting legacy for the local community by creating new urban or green spaces, which will be creatively designed, have environmental issues at their core and educate through innovative interpretive material.

The project aims to provide practical work experience and accredited training for young people in design, environmental interventions, landscape gardening, public art and sculpture. The community will benefit as the work will take place on publicly accessible sites. They will be able to engage with nature on their doorsteps and a project which provides a catalyst for neighbourhood and community development.

Your role is to support the Environmental Artist in the design and delivery of high quality and structured programme, in line with the Creative Pathways objectives. You will support our Lead Tutor to deliver their workshops to a group of up to 20 young people.

A job pack and application form can be downloaded from https://www.impactarts.co.uk/blogs/get-involved-work-with-us/

Completed applications should be sent to jobs@impactarts.co.uk by 12 noon on 17th May 2017



The post Opportunity: Assistant Tutor for Our Bright Future project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Each year, this international award celebrates the best and most innovative in sustainability at the world’s largest arts festival.

All productions taking part in the 2017 Edinburgh Festival Fringe are eligible to apply, and application is made through the completion of a free award toolkit, which poses questions about a production’s choices around show design and content!

A show need not contain explicit themes of sustainability to win: rather the award is judged on the considerations made at the design stages, through to the marketing of their show and their time in Edinburgh. Shows can be of any form and genre, but must be listed as participating in the Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme, and be able to be viewed by our assessors during the Festival.

Apply now for the 2017 Award 

The deadline for applications is midday on Friday 11th August 2017.

Previous recipients include: The Pantry Shelf, produced by Team M&M at Sweet Grassmarket; Allotment by Jules Horne and directed by Kate Nelson, produced by nutshell productions at the Inverleith Allotments in co-production with Assembly; The Man Who Planted Trees adapted from Jean Giono’s story by Ailie Cohen, Richard Medrington, Rick Conte and directed by Ailie Cohen, produced by Puppet State Theatre; How to Occupy an Oil Rig by Daniel Bye; A Comedy of Errors and Macbeth by The HandleBards/Peculius; Lungs by Paines Plough at Roundabout; and Are We Stronger Than Winston? by VOU Fiji Dance.

Have a look through our #GreenFests archive to find out more about the previous winners and shortlisted shows.


If you have any questions about the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, please contact Catriona on catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com or call the Creative Carbon Scotland office on 0131 529 7909.

Click here for more information about the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, previous winners, and about other environmental sustainability initiatives at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. The award is run by the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts and Creative Carbon Scotland and is supported PR Print and Design and the New Arts Sponsorship Grants.

 



The post Applications Open for 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Create a Green Team: Edinburgh Workshop

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Tuesday 30 May 2017, 14:00-16:00

Venue: Quaker Meeting House 7 Victoria Terrace, Edinburgh, EH1 2JL United Kingdom

Being the sole Green Champion in any organisation can be a big job. Are you running out of ideas? Feeling like you are fighting a losing battle? Perhaps you have limited knowledge of how all the other departments work within the company?

Now is the time to form a Green Team. This FREE workshop will give you ideas on how to:

  • Build cooperation from the whole of your organisation
  • Include senior management of the organisation
  • Arrange dates and agendas for your green team meeings
  • Create a tailored environmental policy for your organisation
  • Report back on your work to your board and build support for your work

Bring along your ideas and questions. Refreshments supplied. Feel free to bring a packed lunch

This workshop will also run in Glasgow on Tuesday 16 May
Register Here



The post Create a Green Team: Edinburgh Workshop appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.




About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Create a Green Team: Glasgow Workshop

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Tuesday 16 May 2017, 14:00-16:00

Venue: MANY Studios: 3 Ross Street Glasgow , G1 5AR (Google Map)

Being the sole Green Champion in any organisation can be a big job. Are you running out of ideas? Feeling like you are fighting a losing battle? Perhaps you have limited knowledge of how all the other departments work within the company?

Now is the time to form a Green Team. This FREE workshop will give you ideas on how to:

  • Build cooperation from the whole of your organisation
  • Include senior management of the organisation
  • Arrange dates and agendas for your green team meeings
  • Create a tailored environmental policy for your organisation
  • Report back on your work to your board and build support for your work

Bring along your ideas and questions. Refreshments supplied. Feel free to bring a packed lunch

This workshop will also run in Edinburgh on Tuesday 30 May

Register Here



The post Create a Green Team: Glasgow Workshop appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Ben’s Strategy Blog: Arts and Adaptation – a cultural shift?

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Scottish Government’s Draft Climate Change Plan places increased emphasis on climate change adaptation, but it still plays second fiddle to carbon emissions reduction. But CCS is already taking its first steps into working on adaptation with partners Adaptation Scotland and Aberdeen City Council.

One of the many differences between the international climate change talks in Copenhagen in 2009 (COP15) and those in Paris in 2015 (COP21) was that the latter genuinely incorporated adaptation to the impacts of climate change, whilst in 2009 the focus was all on reducing carbon emissions (mitigation, in the language of climate change).

Indeed, although COP15 was widely considered a failure for not achieving the global deal on reducing emissions that it was meant to, it’s arguable that this was always an unrealistic aim and that without the crisis of 2009 we wouldn’t be where we are today with the comprehensive Paris Agreement, flawed though it may be.

In the summer of 2010 I wrote a dissertation for my MSc in Carbon Management which argued that COP15 had fallen apart partly because the minority world was focused on reducing carbon emissions whilst the majority world wanted support for dealing with climate change and finding a low-carbon pathway to raising standards of living for its people.

The ‘failure’ of COP15 meant that the mitigation bubble burst and from COP16 onwards adaptation began to be seriously included in the negotiations.

Adaptation playing second fiddle

Adaptation was included in the Scottish Government’s Climate Change Act of 2009, but comes a clear second to mitigation in the way the Act is laid out. The emphasis is very much on mitigation, with emissions reduction targets highlighted and the first full mention of Adaptation in part 5 (of 6): ‘Other climate change provisions’.

There are reasons for this.

Back in the noughties climate change NGOs – which had quite a strong impact on the Scottish Parliament’s debates about the Act – worried that allowing too much discussion of adaptation would weaken the resolve of governments and others to grasp the very painful nettle of carbon reduction, so it took a back seat. And it’s fair to say that we are much clearer now about how the impacts of climate change are being felt now across the world.

(The majority world would argue correctly that they knew that back in 2009, but that the minority world wasn’t listening. This climate injustice was what fed the disputes at COP15. I found myself in a side-meeting at the COP with dozens of majority world delegates lambasting the Australian consultant who had been hired to represent some Pacific Island states. They felt that he – a minority world carbon expert – had betrayed their countries by conceding a crucial point in the negotiations. As the only other minority world person in the room it was a sobering experience.)

And in Scotland, like everywhere else, adaptation slowly has been moving to the centre of attention. Scotland’s Climate Change Adaptation Programme was published in May 2014. Adaptation Scotland has been going since 2010, and is managed by SNIFFER. Climate Ready Clyde, Aberdeen Adapts and Edinburgh Adapts are three of their key projects – there are more here.

So things are on the move, but up to now adaptation has certainly been in the shadow of its big sister mitigation.

But what is adaptation?

The usual interpretation of adaptation in this area is adaptation to the impacts of climate change, such as changes in weather patterns leading to flooding, heat waves and severe weather events; changes in plant and animal life, such as the success of different crops or the increased incidence of pests.

At a meeting the other week I was amazed to learn that the growing season (ie the period when it is warm enough for plants to grow rather than just hunker down for the winter) in Scotland is nearly 5 weeks longer now than in 1961.

But there is another area that isn’t spoken about as much: adaptation to living and working in a low carbon environment. As I have written about in other blogs, this is something that we are interested in at CCS.

Culture in its widest sense is the varying ways in which we live in the world; culture in the narrower sense of what the Mexico City Declaration calls ‘the arts and letters’ expresses, reflects and ultimately shapes that wider culture. The wider culture will need to, and undoubtedly will, change in response to both the mitigation efforts and the impacts of climate change.

We all need to think about what this will mean for our lifestyles, our organisations’ business models and so on. For example, in a society where energy is abundant when the sun is shining and the wind is blowing but scarce at others, our relationship with energy will be different to today’s when we are used to unlimited energy at the flick of a switch. Our use of water would change greatly if, like many women in the majority world, we had to carry every drop even a few hundred metres.

Adaptation isn’t necessarily a bad thing: it’s something we are all doing all the time anyway. And climate change brings into focus a number of choices. We can worry and close things down, or we can choose to build a better, fairer  society.

CCS – always adapting!

We at CCS have just written a new business plan for the next four financial years and one of our five strategic outcomes is ‘Adaptation: Increasing numbers of Cultural Sector organisations & practitioners include climate change adaptation into their planning’. During 2017/18 we will be developing our own understanding of what this means for cultural SMEs.

But we have started already with a project with Adaptation Scotland/SNIFFER, Aberdeen Adapts and Robert Gordon University. We’ll be working with four artists (musician Simon Gall; theatre artist Alice Cooper and public artists Jo Hodges and Robbie Coleman) to explore the potential of their different artistic practices for engaging a wider public with the impacts of climate change, specifically in the suburb of Middlefield in Aberdeen.

For more information, feel free to get in touch.

In the meantime, a big thank you to our colleagues at Adaptation Scotland for asking us to join this project, which is part of our culture/SHIFT programme. It’s an experiment for all of us and has already been illuminating as artists and non-cultural partners have got together to understand each others’ work and aims and to collaborate on addressing wicked problems.

Our ‘Arts and Climate Change mini-festival’ is very much a pilot project and we’ll be running Green Teases and other events over the coming months to discuss what we learn. We’ll also be developing our knowledge so that we can help cultural sector organisations understand what adaptation means for them and how they can contribute to Scotland’s wider aims.

Ben Twist
Director, Creative Carbon Scotland



The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: Arts and Adaptation – a cultural shift? appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Engaging Communities on Climate Adaptation Through Art

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

During the weekend of April 21st, CCS co-ran an Arts & Climate Change mini-festival in Middlefield, Aberdeen, as part of a new initiative exploring how the arts can contribute to community engagement in climate change adaptation. Sociologist and collaborator, Dr Leslie Mabon, shares some initial reflections on the day – re-posted from the Urban Green Adaptation Diary.

Early Saturday morning I was pedaling furiously across Aberdeen in a north-westerly direction, through the grounds of the Royal Cornhill Hospital (pleasant), over North Anderson Drive (scary), and along Provost Rust Drive (downhill and therefore fun). The destination was the Middlefield Community Hub, where I joined Creative Carbon Scotland, Adaptation Scotland, Sniffer and Aberdeen City Council for a one-day mini-festival on Arts and Climate Change. The purpose of the festival was to engage with the community on climate change adaptation through the lens of art.

Where people have come from and why they are here

By way of background, Aberdeen is currently strengthening its climate change adaptation thinking via the Aberdeen Adapts initiative, run jointly between Aberdeen City Council and University of Aberdeen. One of the main purposes of the day was to develop understanding of what Aberdeen Adapts is doing and how citizens can get involved. The community we were holding the festival in – Middlefield – is also about to see quite significant investment in greenspace development, supported by the European Regional Development Fund. Hence this is a good time to be thinking about what climate change adaptation means in the context of daily living, and how we can develop decision-making processes that engage communities and deliver climate adaptation benefits equitably across the city.

Over the course of the day we had three workshops. First, musician Simon Gall used old Doric (the local language in Aberdeen) rhymes and songs to get us to think about how we represent trends, events and processes in society and culture, which led into us writing short lyrics of our own about how we might understand changes in the climate. Then, Jo Hodges and Robbie Coleman brought us the Museum of Future Middlefield, where we were given objects, a year, and a bit of social context, and worked in teams to write a narrative as to what that object did in relation to climate change that led to it being in the Museum of Future Middlefield in the Year 3000. Lastly, Alice Mary Cooper led a theatre-based session, in which we used the metaphor of a suitcase to imagine not only what possessions we would take in an evacuation emergency, but also what personal and community qualities Middlefield could offer to Aberdeen more widely in a climate event.

Museum of Future Middlefield – what did this whistle do for climate change adaptation?

Our role at RGU was to be involved in this process to evaluate its potential in sparking discussions on climate change adaptation. Rather than an in-depth report of the day, I’d therefore like to offer just a few initial thoughts that struck me over the course of the workshops:

-people intuitively know a lot about where they live, both in terms of climate and the physical environment (where risk is, what the effects are) and also the social dynamics (who is vulnerable, how community is organised etc). There is still a bit of an assumption out there – I think – that the public need to be ‘educated’ about climate change. Yet the contributions from the workshop participants show there is a lot of knowledge there about Middlefield as a place, and that this knowledge helps imagine what climate change might mean for the local area in a more contextualised way than I ever could. Art can be a very powerful and effective way of drawing this out;

-related to the above is the value of art in facilitating discussion between sectors. What I found very motivating about the day was that the ‘experts’ (as Simon called us!) participated fully in all the sessions, making personal and creative contributions of their own. Especially in the last session, we got some excellent discussion going across the whole room as a result. The artists were brilliant at facilitating this – and it also helped that the ‘experts’ were perhaps prepared to step outside their comfort zone a bit and participate as individual people rather than representatives of their organisations!

-third, we often don’t pay enough attention to the fact that societal engagement is a messy process. Not literally, but in terms of all the ‘behind the scenes’ work that goes on – the improvisation on the day, the out-of-hours and weekend working, the way we adapt to the spaces we work in on the hoof. It is important that we embrace this messiness and acknowledge it as an inevitable part of community work rather than trying to create standardised, one-size-fits-all solutions for community engagement;

-lastly, when it comes to climate change, art isn’t just a way of visualising ‘the science’. Rather, it brings a whole different way of thinking about what the problems are, what the potential solutions might be and – crucially in my view – helps us to think about how we might get there. All three sessions really played on this idea of art as a stimulus for thinking about the future, in a much more engaging way than the kind of scenario-based exercises with maps and worksheets that I would have done could ever do!

Middlefield Community Hub, and some greenspace in the regeneration plan

Although the mini-festival itself was a one-day event, we see this as the start rather than the end of thinking about the implications of climate change on daily living in Middlefield and Aberdeen more widely. The next steps are to formally evaluate the event, and for RGU to undertake some follow-up interviews. We will have more to report in due course!

More information on the climate change adaptation in Aberdeen can be found here.


Thanks to Leslie for sharing his blog on the CCS site! Interested in learning more about climate change adaptation? Have a read of CCS Director, Ben Twist’s, most recent Stategy Blog.

The Arts & Adaptation project in Aberdeen is delivered as part of the Adaptation Scotland programme, funded by Scottish Government and is run in partnership with Sniffer, Aberdeen Adapts/Aberdeen City Council and Robert Gordon University.



The post Engaging Communities on Climate Adaptation Through Art appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Test Unit 2017: Occupying the Post Industrial City

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Agile-City Brings You This Opportunity

Deadline: 8 May 2017

Art, Design & Architecture Summer School
18 – 24 June

Throughout the week-long programme six facilitators will each lead a group exploring a different topic in response to the central theme:

Unit 1: Responsive Lighting – Jason Bruges Studio
Using both internal and external spaces we will animate the site and intrigue the public by exploring innovative light-based methods, creating site-specific interactive environments.

Unit 2: Urban Bothy – Baxendale
As exploration of our industrial urban landscape becomes ever more popular what are the possibilities for small, unique and affordable modes of temporal occupation within our cities?

Unit 3: Spatial Occupation – Assemble & TAKTAL
Using Civic House as a live case study we will explore themes of modular workspace, prefabrication, open source platforms, incremental development and the financial models to realise these ideas.

Unit 4: Façades – A Feral Studio
How do we read the city? What strategies can we use to design communicative building? Through façade and design interventions we will examine surfaces, layers & architecture as communication.

Unit 5: Eventful City – The National Theatre of Scotland
The ‘eventful city’ is a key driver for connecting people, testing ideas and initiating change. This unit will explore site-specific design, production, performance and participatory theatre.

Unit 6: Building Collaborative EconomiesValentina Karga
As post-industrial societies continue to struggle with issues of resource scarcity, how can values of sharing and collaboration translate into alternative forms of economy? Our exploration will address this question in an attempt to build stronger and more resilient communities.

Apply here

Want to know more?

Visit Agile-City’s website and read the detailed Project Pack here.

Hear from last year’s participant and facilitators via this short film.

Please get in touch for more information via hello@agile-city.com


The post Opportunity: Test Unit 2017: Occupying the Post Industrial City appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland