Creative Carbon Scotland

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Ben’s Strategy Blog: It IS what you do (not just the way that you do it)

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: It IS what you do (not just the way that you do it) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

The Climate Change (Scotland) Act of 2009 places a duty on every public body to act:
1) in the way best calculated to contribute to delivery of the Act’s emissions reduction targets;
2) in the way best calculated to deliver any statutory adaptation programme; and
3) in a way that it considers most sustainable.

But what does that third duty really mean?

Most if not all public bodies, which include everything from local authorities, universities and NHS trusts to cultural NDPBs such as Creative Scotland and the National Galleries, are now reporting and working to reduce their direct carbon emissions and developing adaptation plans. But the third duty is less specific and, I think, less acted upon. Indeed the 2011 Guidance on putting the Public Bodies Duty into practice is much less detailed about what ‘Acting Sustainably’ means, partly I imagine because it will mean very different things to different organisations.

The first two Public Bodies Duties focus on the direct impacts and responses to climate change of the Bodies involved. They must consider their own carbon emissions and their own adaptation plans. But George Tarvit of the Sustainable Scotland Network, which works with Public Bodies to support them in their duties under the act, points out that the third duty provides an opportunity to look not at their operations, but at their functions: what they do, not how they do it. And to me, this is the more interesting area.

A core finding of my PhD research, working with His Majesty’s Theatre (HMT) in Aberdeen, is that whilst the theatre triggers hundreds of thousands of journeys each year by audience members, 70% of which are made by car, the theatre hadn’t previously been involved in transport planning in the region. Meanwhile Aberdeenshire Council, from where many of the journeys start, hadn’t previously talked to HMT about transport planning; nor had Stagecoach, which provides the relevant bus service. A similar situation recently came to light at a meeting convened by Transport Scotland of the Edinburgh Festivals and all the relevant transport providers. In both of these situations, the individual organisations were generally thinking about their own climate impacts and adaptation, but perhaps not how they were involved in, and could help influence, those of their partners and collaborators.

Working together

My project in Aberdeen brought together HMT, Aberdeenshire Council and Stagecoach to work together to overcome some of the barriers to travelling by bus which no single partner could control – things like the geography of Aberdeen or the coordination of bus services with show times. Whilst the project was only moderately successful in moving people from car to bus, it was acknowledged that these changes take time. What I hope will be its greatest success is that HMT will now see itself as an active partner in transport planning and the others will consider the theatre in their strategic planning. If so they will be able to have a much greater impact on theatregoers’ travel than if they all act individually.

There’s a link here, incidentally, with the Scottish Government’s ISM (individual/social/ material) model of behaviour change. Behaviour change usually focuses on the individual whose behaviour someone is hoping to change (the clue’s in the name). But the ISM model can (I’d say should, but that’s a different blog) be used to influence not individuals but those bodies, companies etc which control or dictate the ‘material’, whether that be the physical infrastructure or the laws, regulations and immaterial infrastructure that we operate within.

There is such a thing as society

The Public Bodies between them interact constantly with all of Scotland’s population. Their first two duties clearly focus on their own climate impacts and adaptation. When it comes to Acting Sustainably, I’d suggest it would be useful to think about how they can work together and with other partners to change the complex social system within which we all live (you might want to call this ‘society’) to help achieve those demanding national carbon reduction targets and adapt to the new world we are building.

Alongside the Act and the Guidance sits another document, the Low Carbon Scotland: Public Engagement Strategy. This was published at the tail end of 2010 and focuses on achieving the carbon reduction targets set by the Act. It stresses that:

Setting targets was just the start. Achieving them can only be done through a joint approach, with government; the private, public and third sectors; local communities and individuals all contributing. (p4)

Let’s consider the role of the cultural strategy

As I have argued before in these blogs, achieving these very demanding targets – which may well be increased in forthcoming legislation following the Paris Agreement – will require a massive change in the ways in which the people of Scotland live. In other words, a massive change in our culture in the widest sense. The Public Engagement Strategy only touches upon culture – in the narrower sense of what the Mexico City Declaration describes as ‘the arts and letters’ – very briefly. On p10 it states, ‘We will also consider the role of the cultural sector which has the capacity to educate, influence and stimulate debate.’ Whilst I would say this is rather a narrow vision of what culture is (there’s more to it than the cultural sector) and what it can do, it’s good to see it in there.

Of the Public Bodies, a number have a cultural focus: Creative Scotland, the National Galleries, Historic Environment Scotland, the National Museums, the National Records of Scotland and the National Library. The Scottish Government has seconded Creative Scotland’s very forward-thinking Director of Arts and Engagement Leonie Bell to write a Cultural Strategy. Wouldn’t it be interesting and exciting to see the Cultural Strategy take on the challenge of climate change directly and develop the role of culture in steering us towards a positive future? Wouldn’t it be interesting if the cultural NDPBs, as those bodies shaping our wider culture, were to take a lead and make building a low-carbon, equitable, post-climate changed society a part of their core purpose?

 

Image Credit: Ella Fitzgerald New York ca 1946. William P Gottlieb


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for Papers: Postcards from the Anthropocene

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from the University of Edinburgh’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

The post Call for Papers: Postcards from the Anthropocene appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



If the emergence of the Anthropocene implies an epistemological shift, how might this transform the way we think about representation and, more specifically, its geopolitics? What kinds of representations carry significant material, metaphorical and methodological implications for this question, and can help us to ‘situate’ ourselves – if that is a still viable term – in our new conditions of groundlessness and scalelessness?

This symposium proposes to explore this through the motif of ‘Postcards from the Anthropocene’. The postcards that we imagine are documentary space-time snapshots, which convey complex assemblages of dynamic, non-linear, unpredictable, ad-hoc networks between interdependent and trans-scalar actants. They may raise questions about the ethical and political challenges of the dominant modes of technoscientific production in the Anthropocene, modes that are constituted through existing power relationships, subject positions, differences and inequalities. On the other hand, they might open up new streams of speculative and creative geopolitical imaginaries and forms of collective subjectivities that recalibrate existing value systems and indicate alternatives.

For this symposium we are seeking presentations that deploy different formats to reflect upon new kinds of reciprocity between geopolitics and representation through a found, described, designed or imagined postcard from the Anthropocene. We anticipate that this proliferation of anthropocenic representations will reveal and encourage transformations in practices of scrutinizing, strategizing, mediating and assembling, which are in turn animated in complex ways by operations that range from positioning, scaling, scripting, and weathering to fabricating, mining, reframing and recalibrating.

Two kinds of submissions are invited. Intending participants should submit either:

1) a 300-word abstract of a proposed conference presentation;

or 2) a single image together with a 300-word commentary on it. Invitations to speak at the symposium will be extended on the basis of the abstracts. The image/text submissions will be reviewed, and selected submissions presented in a parallel format in the symposium.

SUBMISSIONS

Proposals should be sent by email to postcardsfromtheanthropocene@gmail.com by Friday, February 24th 2017. Proposals should also include a short biographical note (maximum 150 words), together with the author’s institutional address and full contact details.

PUBLICATION

It is intended that an edited book will be developed from selected papers and images presented at the symposium.

CONTACT

postcardsfromtheanthropocene@gmail.com

MORE INFORMATION

www.postcardsfromtheanthropocene.com


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Open Call: The Morning Boat Research and Production Residency

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Introduction

The morning boat is an international artist residency and laboratory for artistic research and action. Activities will focus on local industries in Jersey that are often referred to as the foundations of the island economy – Agriculture, finance and tourism – and their impact on people’s lives. The morning boat responds to an urgent need for a reflective and meaningful public discourse on complex critical issues and real life practices that are central to the island’s economy, social fabric and way of life. Artists will be invited to Jersey whose work is thought provoking, unforgettable, accessible to its audience and sensitive to the context in which it is presented. Projects will be developed specifically for the island of Jersey, responding to its unique character and narrative. Work will take place in public spaces and every-day working environments, in collaboration with the local community.

Thematic focus for 2017 and 2018: Agriculture and fisheries

Working together with farmers, fishermen, seasonal workers, politicians, chefs, retailers and consumers, artists are asked to investigate and respond to the locally grown, caught, gathered and reared food chain. They will explore the past, present and future implications of agricultural practices in Jersey. They will interact with and respond to existing infrastructures, farming practices, social structures, economic conditions and the products themselves.

Working with and for the local community

The morning boat aims to be an arts residency that takes place in the heart of the local community, from the research that is undertaken, through to the public presentation of the work. At the start of each residency artists will be paired with local experts and employees, to conduct first-hand research and develop an understanding towards industry practices, working environments, concerns and challenges. This experience provides the starting point and inspiration for continued research and the creation of new work that interacts with existing infrastructures and reimagines daily routines.

Conditions

Artists will receive an artist fee of between 1800 and 2000 pounds for a period of approximately four weeks in Jersey. Travel expenses will be reimbursed and accommodation will be provided. A small production budget will be available for materials and a network of partners are standing by to provide additional material and logistical support. The curatorial team will assist you throughout the residency, but a level of autonomy is desirable.

Application process

Please read the FULL OPEN CALL document for application details. Submission deadline: February 10th 2017.

Selection criteria

The morning boat is a multi-disciplinary programme. Among others, we welcome proposals from architects, film makers, theater practitioners, puppeteers, choreographers, robotic engineers, writers, sculptors, sound artists, musicians, textile designers, food artists, interdisciplinary collectives and undefinable practices. A specialism in public art practices (either as ‘interventions’ or as live programmed events), might be helpful, but is not essential.

More information is available on The Morning Boat website.

The post Open Call: The Morning Boat Research and Production Residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


 


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Shaping the Future of Festival Vision: 2025 at The Festival Suppliers Awards

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Meeting to shape the future of Festival Vision:2025 at The Festival Supplier Awards, Jan 26th 2017

The post Shaping the Future of Festival Vision: 2025 at The Festival Suppliers Awards appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Powerful Thinking and Julie’s Bicycle will hold the first Festival Vision:2025 meeting at The Festival Suppliers Awards on January 26th 2017 at The Hurlingham Club, London.

The Meeting will bring together 30 plus Vision Festivals, events that have pledged to work together for a more sustainable festival industry, to shape the future of the 10-year Vision, and take part in professional skills workshops for their onward journey to more sustainable events.

The day will include workshops on reducing fuel use and energy costs, waste management, sustainable travel, and accurate measuring and recording of impact data by Julie’s Bicycle, ZAP Concepts, and the sustainability teams from Shambala Festival, Festival Republic and Cambridge Folk Festival.

Alison Tickell, CEO of Julie’s Bicycle, will host a discussion on the future of the Vision as well as giving attendees a broader perspective of the opportunity in the arts and cultural sector for climate leadership.

Guest speakers will include Richard Gillies, former Sustainability Director for The Kingfisher Group and Marks & Spencer, and CEO of Festival On The Wall, who brings insight into influencing the supply chain change in a client facing business.

There will also be space to network and share experiences as well as explore opportunities for collaboration and influencing the supply chain through collective purchasing.

The event is free for Vision:2025 Festivals who will also receive a free place to The Festival Suppliers Awards (normally £280), which are generously hosting the event, including drinks reception, evening dinner and awards ceremony — where Powerful Thinking Steering group member Victoria Chapman, Sustainability Coordinator for Festival Republic, will present the Green Supplier Award on behalf of Powerful Thinking.

There are still a few places available for the event. All UK Music Festivals are welcome to reserve a ticket providing they have taken the Festival Vision: 2025 pledge to aim for a more sustainable event.

For more details contact bethan@powerful-thinking.org.uk


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Call for application for the Artists’ Development Programme 2017 (Beyond borders)

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The European Investment Bank (EIB) Institute is pleased to announce the 2017 edition of its Artists’ Development Programme (ADP), looking for one visual artist (born after 1 January 1982) from EU Member States focusing on the theme of “Beyond Borders: Frontiers, Displacement and Dispersion in Art”.

The ADP offers emerging European visual artists a month-long residency in Luxembourg, enabling them to develop their practice and create a new (body of) work(s), boosted by the mentorship of a high-profile established artist. In 2017, the recipients will each be mentored by acclaimed British artist Callum Innes.

Eligibility

  • Less than 35 years of age at the time of application
  • EU nationality
  • Fluency in English

Budget and duration

The EIB Institute will cover the artists’ travel costs to and from Luxembourg, including a stopover to visit Callum Innes in Edinburgh. The artists will receive a stipend (EUR 100 per day each) and will be provided with a living/working space. At the end of the residency, the participants will receive a success fee of EUR 1 500 each, provided they have produced an artwork. The duration of the residency in Luxembourg will be one month in June 2017.

Upon completion of the residency, the EIB may acquire the artwork(s) produced on-site from the artists.

Application procedure
Requirements

– CV (in English)
– Scanned copy of the passport, identity card of the applicant or other document evidencing legitimate residence in one of the eligible countries (in English)
– A letter of motivation/intent specifying personal drive and expectations for the programme (maximum 600 words, in English)
– Portfolio of visual documentation of several works best characterizing the art of the applicant (in PDF, four A4 pages maximum)
– Names and contacts of two professional referees, familiar with the art of the applicant
– A brief reference in the body of the email to how the applicant found out about the programme

Selection procedure

A jury, consisting of members of the EIB Institute Arts Committee, external arts professionals and the mentor, will select the candidates based on the artistic quality of their work, their project and motivation, the applicants’ potential to make the most of the opportunity offered by the residency and the relevance of the applicants’ practices to the cultural context of the EIB Institute.

The selected candidates will be informed of the jury’s decision via email by mid-March 2017.

Any application failing to comply with the set requirements will be automatically disqualified.

Applications should be sent electronically to Ms Delphine Munro (arts@eib.org)

Deadline for application: 31 January 2017 at midnight (GMT+1).


The post Call for application for the Artists’ Development Programme 2017 (Beyond borders) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Call for application for the Artists’ Development Programme 2017 (the Anthropocene)

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland


 

The European Investment Bank (EIB) Institute is pleased to announce the 2017 edition of its Artists’ Development Programme (ADP), looking for one visual artist (born after 1 January 1982) from EU Member States focusing on the theme of “The Imprint of Man – Representing the Anthropocene”.

The ADP offers emerging European visual artists a month-long residency in Luxembourg, enabling them to develop their practice and create a new (body of) work(s), boosted by the mentorship of acclaimed British artist Callum Innes.

Eligibility

  • Less than 35 years of age at the time of application
  • EU nationality
  • Fluency in English

Budget and duration

The EIB Institute will cover the artists’ travel costs to and from Luxembourg, including a stopover to visit Callum Innes in Edinburgh. The artists will receive a stipend (EUR 100 per day each) and will be provided with a living/working space. At the end of the residency, the participants will receive a success fee of EUR 1 500 each, provided they have produced an artwork. The duration of the residency in Luxembourg will be one month in June 2017.

Upon completion of the residency, the EIB may acquire the artwork(s) produced on-site from the artists.

Application procedure
Requirements

– CV (in English)
– Scanned copy of the passport, identity card of the applicant or other document evidencing legitimate residence in one of the eligible countries (in English)
– A letter of motivation/intent specifying personal drive and expectations for the programme (maximum 600 words, in English)
– Portfolio of visual documentation of several works best characterizing the art of the applicant (in PDF, four A4 pages maximum)
– Names and contacts of two professional referees, familiar with the art of the applicant
– A brief reference in the body of the email to how the applicant found out about the programme

Selection procedure

A jury, consisting of members of the EIB Institute Arts Committee, external arts professionals and the mentor, will select the candidates based on the artistic quality of their work, their project and motivation, the applicants’ potential to make the most of the opportunity offered by the residency and the relevance of the applicants’ practices to the cultural context of the EIB Institute.

The selected candidates will be informed of the jury’s decision via email by mid-March 2017.

Any application failing to comply with the set requirements will be automatically disqualified.

Applications should be sent electronically to Ms Delphine Munro (arts@eib.org)

Deadline for application: 31 January 2017 at midnight (GMT+1).


The post Call for application for the Artists’ Development Programme 2017 (the Anthropocene) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Creative Carbon Scotland Annual Report Published!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Read the 2015/16 Report.

Creative Carbon Scotland grows and grows busier with each passing year. In this report, you can read about our 2015-16 work including ArtCOP Scotland and the Green Tease, our GAI Conference: 50 Shades of Green, training for people working in the screen industry, our research project with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and great work generally by the arts sector in Scotland in both improving its own environmental performance and influencing wider society and public opinion about climate change.

Read the annual report and keep in touch.


The post Creative Carbon Scotland Annual Report Published! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

CCS Newsletter

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland Annual Report 2015-2016 Published!

It’s been a very busy couple of years for Creative Carbon Scotland. Read our annual report from the March 2015-16 period for a taster of the types of projects we’ve been working on and will continue doing in 2017.

[Read the Report]


Do The Green Thing: Get Ungifted

In their 5th issue, Do The Green Thing are asking everyone to consider their consumption behaviours this holiday season and get ‘ungifted’ by creating long-lasting holiday memories without the waste.

[Ungift the Ones You Love Here]



NOTICEBOARD


Environment Connecting Theme Workshops

Early in the new year, Creative Carbon Scotland is planning to hold workshops for RFO applicants. These workshops will focus on Creative Scotland’s requirements for embedding environmental sustainability into the arts, screen and creative industries. Find out how we can help you during the funding application process!

[Workshop Details]


Get Your Early Bird Tickets for the Edinburgh Sustainable Innovation Conference

The Buchanan Institute are proud to be hosting the Edinburgh Sustainable Innovation Conference (ESIC) on Monday 20th February 2017. The aim of the conference is to redraft the rhetoric surrounding sustainability into a language that everyone can understand. Get your ticket at a special price until 16 January!

[More Information]


Learning for Sustainability Scotland AGM

Learning for Sustainability Scotland‘s AGM on 19 January will look at how you can contribute to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals in Scotland and beyond through your work.

[Book Your Place]


Open Call: Cultural Innovation Prize

How can culture defy climate change? The second edition of the Cultural Innovation International Prize encourages projects that offer imaginative and effective solutions to one of the biggest global problems of the 21st century. The winning proposal will be included in an exhibition on the subject at the CCCB.

Submission deadline: 31 January

[More Information]


Participants Needed for Changeworks Energy Saving Project

Changeworks has partnered with the University of Edinburgh to deliverIDEAL (Intelligent Domestic Energy Advice Loop), a two year cutting edge research and advice project on how smart technology can help save energy in the home. We are actively looking for households in Edinburgh to participate. Participants can benefit from saving energy and money through more efficient home energy use.

[How to Participate]


The post CCS December Newsletter appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Ben’s Strategy Blog: Helping Trump Become Carbon Literate

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland.

A cold chill gripped the hearts of those of us working in climate change when Donald Trump won the US presidential election. Coming as the Paris Agreement came into force and as COP22 was taking place in Marrakech to sort out the details, would Trump fulfil his campaign promise to pull out of the Agreement? And can CCS help him increase his carbon literacy?

Fifteen years ago the USA’s failure to ratify the Kyoto Protocol fatally undermined that agreement and damaged geopolitics more widely. Concessions made to ensure the treaty came into force through Russia’s ratification led to a glut of the permits to release carbon dioxide that were the basis of the Kyoto Protocol. (Russia’s economy had collapsed after the end of the Soviet Union, which meant that it was already emitting less CO2 than in the baseline year of 1990 and so had lots of permits to sell.) This in turn led to an under-pricing of carbon in the markets, allowing countries to buy cheap permits rather than make the industrial changes necessary to reduce emissions.

So the Kyoto Protocol didn’t achieve the planned reductions. In addition, a back-room deal enabled Russia to join the World Trade Organisation in return for its ratification, helping what was effectively a rogue state to enter world politics and trade at the highest level – with implications which we are seeing today. Will Trump’s election mean the Paris Agreement goes the same way?

Room for optimism?

At the University of Edinburgh the Global Environment and Society Academy (GESA) hastily convened an event to discuss the Trump effect and hundreds of students, staff and others crammed into the ECCI to hear talks from specialists in international law, US politics, business and the humanities, assessing the effects of Trump’s election on the work to address climate change. They weren’t as gloomy as might have been expected, with a number of points being made:

  • The US has ratified the Paris Agreement and can’t technically withdraw for three years, after which a further year’s notice has to be given. So even if it does pull out, it won’t take place until the end of Trump’s first presidential term.
  • Trump could simply hinder US action on climate change despite the ratification of the treaty. It was acknowledged that this could be as damaging as outright withdrawal.
  • But Elizabeth Bomberg noted that federal power is limited and NGOs and others in the US are skilled at using litigation, appeals and other legal methods to delay appointments, rule changes and so on that would get in the way of work to reduce emissions.
  • There has always been more climate change action at state and city level than at the presidential level in the US, and this could continue, although the shift to the Republicans at all levels of government could have an effect.
  • Andy Kerr of the ECCI pointed out that a number of big US coal companies have filed for bankruptcy recently, not because of regulation but because the demand for coal has collapsed as (much cleaner) shale gas and renewables have taken its place and coal-fired power stations have closed. China is forging ahead with renewables and the US risks being left behind, which industrialists and capitalists won’t like. Some Republican states are benefitting greatly from the upsurge in renewables.

Although I’m not sure I fully share Andy’s implicit ecological moderniser view that technology will solve the problem, I do agree with him that a wave of change is moving across the world including the US and Trump may find it harder than he thinks to revive coal and turn America’s back on change.

A good special report  (Breaking the Habit) in the Economist backs this up and interestingly the Earth Negotiations Bulletin’s Summary and Analysis (this is quite heavy going, but go to p36 for the analysis which is more readable) of the Marrakech talks highlights the fact that, when leadership from the USA was lacking, others stepped forward to fill the leadership vacuum, with 48 vulnerable majority-world countries committing to be 100% renewable-powered by 2050. And as he is moving towards taking office, Trump seems to be learning more about climate change and backing down on his campaign promises on climate change as much as on some of his other policies.

Strange bedfellows…

Since I started writing this blog, Trump has nominated former Texas governor and fossil fuel proponent Rick Perry as Energy Secretary; Rex Tillerson, Chief Executive of Exxon Mobil as his Secretary of State; and climate-change sceptic Myron Ebell to lead his transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency. Which makes me a bit less optimistic. But Tillerson spoke in London in October on the need for a carbon price:

In doing so, we must continue to lower emissions. At ExxonMobil, we share the view that the risks of climate change are serious and warrant thoughtful action. … We have long supported a carbon tax as the best policy of those being considered. Replacing the hodge-podge of current, largely ineffective regulations with a revenue-neutral carbon tax would ensure a uniform and predictable cost of carbon across the economy. It would allow market forces to drive solutions. It would maximize transparency, reduce administrative complexity, promote global participation and easily adjust to future developments in our understanding of climate science as well as the policy consequences of these actions.

(Republican) Texas is also now heavily invested in renewables as well as oil. And the factors above still apply: there will be plenty of politicians arguing against their appointments at the Senate hearings, and not only Democrats.

Increasing (Trump’s) carbon literacy

Trump may become a bit more carbon literate over the next few months as he discovers that Old King Coal is on the way out and China threatens to beat America in making money by selling renewable technologies to the world. He might want to call us for some help, as in November Creative Carbon Scotland hosted two Carbon Literacy courses (Neat segue! – Ed), one in Edinburgh with staff from the Edinburgh Festivals and one in Glasgow with mostly freelancers in the TV and film production industry.

Working to a specification developed by social enterprise Cooler Projects in Manchester, the Carbon Literacy Project provides a day’s training in the basic science and policy of climate change plus action planning for individuals to apply to their work, education or home life. The core curriculum is tailored to be relevant to the particular group of participants – so the Festivals staff looked at travel by artists to their events and considered the issues relevant to large public gatherings, while the screen production people will have looked at things including the use of diesel generators and how to reduce their use and their fuel consumption.

The screen production course was provided by a consortium led by BAFTA which focuses on the use of the ALBERT planning tool. This helps production and location managers list what they expect to happen in production and then work out what the anticipated carbon emissions might be. The tool also helps them estimate the emissions related to doing things in different ways: different travel modes, different generators, different lighting kit. So it moves us on from retrospective carbon measurement and reporting to the next stage: planning for carbon reduction.

The Edinburgh Festivals course – and indeed the Cooler Projects approach, which the screen production course also uses – focuses on what participants can do to reduce their own or their organisation’s carbon emissions. To pass – and you get a nice certificate! – students must identify changes they will make themselves and in their team at work that will have a real effect.

This isn’t rocket science in the world of carbon management, but the interesting thing about it is that it is aimed at those who are not particularly interested in climate change, environmental sustainability etc. Much of the usual effort aimed at changing behaviours is either taken up by the already concerned, or avoids talking too much about the science of climate change. Cooler Project’s curriculum is strong on information as well as action planning, and is designed to take people from no knowledge to quite sophisticated knowledge very quickly. I helped deliver the Edinburgh Festivals course, and it worked a treat.

The Edinburgh course is part of a project run by the Edinburgh Sustainable Development Partnership of which I am vice-chair, and funded by the Edinburgh Partnership. We at CCS are interested in Carbon Literacy as an idea that has use across the cultural sector: I’m talking to drama schools about offering it to students and we’re talking to Gordon Cunningham, who leads on Low Carbon Skills at Skills Development Scotland, about its inclusion in Modern Apprenticeships. If you’re interested, get in touch.

Image: Cooler Projects and The Carbon Literacy Trust.

The post Ben’s Strategy Blog: Helping Trump Become Carbon Literate appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Workshops on the ‘Environment Connecting Theme’ for your RFO Application

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Workshop dates will soon be announced for exploring Creative Scotland’s ‘Environment Connecting Theme’ in their upcoming RFO Applications.

Every applicant for Regular Funding will be required to show how they will address the Environment Connecting Theme. The best applications will apply innovative and creative approaches to environmental sustainability. With the Scottish Government poised to bring in a more ambitious Climate Change Act in early 2017, this is a great opportunity to strengthen your application, imaginatively develop your environmental sustainability work and show how the arts, screen and creative industries are helping to deliver Scotland’s world-leading climate change commitments.

Early in the new year, we will be holding workshops on the Environment Connecting Theme and encourage all RFO applicants to come along and learn more.

What is the Environment Connecting Theme?

Creative Scotland believes that RFOs are expected to embed each of the four connecting themes across their organisation and work. They have provided the following guidance:

Across the network of organisations that we will fund, the key outcomes in relation to Environment are:

  • Reduce the direct environmental impacts of our work
  • Influence others on issues relating to the environment

What is the criterion for Environment?

How well is Environment embedded across all aspects of your organisation and its work?

How will we assess this?

We will particularly look for:

  • Any systems in place to measure your carbon emissions, any policies or plans for environmental sustainability including reducing your emissions.
  • A Board or staff member who has responsibility for or actively champions environmental issues within the organisation and that there is a clear structure to address any issues.
  • Any opportunities where you are taking the opportunity to influence others with whom you engage

How Creative Carbon Scotland can help

The current group of Regular Funded Organisations (RFOs) were required to measure and report their carbon emissions from April 2015, and did so for the first time this September.  We’ll continue to provide support in this area and new applicants or current RFOs wanting further help should contact Fiona MacLennan, our Carbon Reduction Project Manager to discuss their needs.

Early in the new year, we are hoping to run free workshops in Edinburgh and Glasgow to help applicants consider how they can strengthen their applications in these areas:

  • Communicating their own work on environmental sustainability to audiences, suppliers, staff, freelancers and artists
  • Programming work that touches upon or explores environmental sustainability and climate change, both within and outwith the organisations’ usual programme
  • Engaging staff with climate change and environmental sustainability more widely

We’ll discuss the areas you might think about and provide examples of interesting work from around the world. The workshops will last about 2 hours and refreshments will be provided.

Please check back next month for updates on workshop dates and locations.

We will offer further workshops in different areas around the country if there is demand – please get in touch with Ben on ben.twist@creativecarbonscotland.com if you’d like us to arrange a session near you. And in January we will be running our first webinar to enable people who find it difficult to attend a meeting to participate. Again, please contact Ben if you want further information.

The post Opportunity: Workshops on the ‘Environment Connecting Theme’ for your RFO Application appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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