Fringe

Venues and Companies Invited to Apply to Sustainable Fringe Awards 2019

The Sustainable Fringe Awards recognise innovative ideas that seek to tackle issues of climate change or environmental sustainability at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, in design, content or execution.

Artists and venues are invited to submit new, novel, creative or ambitious ideas for increasing the sustainability of their work, and nominate themselves to be a ‘Green Pick’ of this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Sustainable Fringe Awards 2019

Ideas can tackle ways of reducing environmental impact (e.g. changing resource use or minimising carbon emissions), creating pro-environmental behaviour among participants, organisers or audiences, or changing our wider society’s perspective of climate change.

  • Hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland (the national charity for environmental sustainability in culture) in collaboration with Staging Change (a new network of theatre makers committed to greening the industry) the winning artist/company and winning venue will be awarded £100 to help implement their green idea and will be featured on the Creative Carbon Scotland website.
  • Ideas should relate to productions or practices taking place at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, but do not need to be implemented during the 2019 Festival or already be in progress at the point of submission : this award rewards the idea.
  • Shortlisted ideas will be announced during the Start your Sustainable Fringe day (5th August), with the winners announced at the Sustainability at the Fringe Reception as part of the Fringe Central Events Programme.
  • Ideas submissions for this award will open in July 2019, and close on Friday 2 August 2019, and will be in the form of an online form. Ideas should be described in a maximum of 300 words.

‘Green Picks’ of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2019

For the first time, Staging Change will be curating a list of ‘Green Picks’ across the Festival: show creatively engaging with topics of climate change and environmental sustainability within their artistic content. To be considered for inclusion as a ‘Green Pick’, shows must opt-in below. More information will be available on the Staging Change website in due course. 

Submit your show here:

Venues and Companies Invited to Apply to Sustainable Fringe Awards 2019 on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Start your own Sustainable Fringe! – Sustainability Day at Fringe Central

At this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Creative Carbon Scotland, Staging Change and the University of Edinburgh’s Social Responsibility and Sustainability Department will be collaborating to produce a day of workshops, talks and activities to help Fringe-goers have a more #SustainableFringe.

Join us in the Respite Room in Fringe Central (Venue 2) on Monday 5 August 2019 for a day celebrating green arts at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Hear from a range of exciting speakers, pick up tips on how to reduce your impact as Fringe-goers, and meet others who are passionate about green action!

10.30 – 12.00 – Staging Change Sustainable Design Workshop

The day will begin with a design workshop from Staging Change, a network of performers and makers who work together to green up the theatre and entertainment industry. The workshop will start with an overview about sustainable design in performance, from set, to lighting to marketing. We will then collaborate in groups to prototype solutions to improve sustainability in the theatre and entertainment industry. The groups will then share their ideas and we’ll finish the session with an informal debrief.

13.00 – 15.00 – Festival Sustainability: A Practical Skills Workshop

Next up, we have a workshop led by University of Edinburgh’s Social Responsibility and Sustainability Department. This two-part workshop will include a presentation on sustainability in the Festival and the importance of reuse to reduce environmental impact. We will hear from experts in the field of material reuse, focused on props and costuming. After this we will have an open workshop for sewing and repair skills, either for general skill building or with an opportunity to bring your own items which you are hoping to fix!

16.00 – 17.00 – Staging Change: Creating a Green Movement

As storytellers, we have a unique capacity to explore key issues with audiences on and off the stage. Join Staging Change’s discussion with a variety of performers and makers at our discussion on sustainability in the theatre and entertainment industry. Whether you’re the greenest theatre machine or new to the game, everyone is welcome!

18.00 – 19.00 – Sustainability at the Fringe: Reception

The final event of the evening is hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland. Environmental sustainability at the Fringe is increasingly prominent, with artists, companies and venues demonstrating how it can be done. Whether you are a long-time green innovator, or new to tackling the climate crisis through culture, we invite you to celebrate sustainability in all shapes and forms at the festival! With expertise from leading arts and sustainability organisations, and refreshments on hand, come and meet others passionate about sustainability in the arts.


For more ideas on how to have a #SustainableFringe head to www.stagingchange.comwww.edin.ac/festival or browse Creative Carbon Scotland’s resources section.

Stand Up for Your Planet 
If you are planning one big night out during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe then make it “Stand Up for Your Planet”, Green Arts member Assembly’s one-off comedy extravaganza on Monday 19th August, raising awareness for one of the most pressing issues of our time – protecting our planet. Proceeds from this comedy spectacular will go to Creative Carbon Scotland to help us unlock the role of the arts to defuse the climate crisis and helping artists and arts organisations go greener. Find out more and book your ticket. 

The post Start your own Sustainable Fringe! – Sustainability Day at Fringe Central appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Picks and Opportunities of the 2018 Edinburgh Festival Fringe

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

“All the world’s a stage” and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe is arguably one the most well-known stages of them all. With thousands of productions and hundreds of venues putting on tens of thousands of performances over a three-week period, it’s one of the world’s biggest cultural events – and somewhere where sustainability, climate change and environmental impact is being tackled in a variety of ways.

Here’s our summary of sustainability activity at the Fringe:

Strategic Engagement by the Edinburgh Festival Fringe Society

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe society are the guardians of the festival, providing leadership, co-ordination and support for the many that participate. In 2018 they launched their ‘Fringe Blueprint’: a statement of intent of their work until 2022 (their 75thanniversary!).

One of their 8 key commitments was to “A Green Fringe: to reduce the festival’s carbon footprint and champion initiatives that limit our impact on the environment”, with ideas around paper reduction, adoption of cutting-edge technologies, and embedding sustainability into the designs for a new headquarters. With this long-term high-level demonstration of their commitment to sustainability, we’re excited to support them as a green festival!

Practical Support for Venues and Companies

We know that sustainable practice can be new for the local, national and international venues and companies producing shows at the festival, so we work with the Edinburgh Festival Fringe Society to create and promote toolkits to advise how to increase the sustainability of everything from show design to promotion! Current handbooks and advice can be found on the EdFringe website, including:

Our Green Arts Initiative supports Scottish-based venues, companies, agencies and other cultural organisations to reduce their environmental impact and increase their sustainability. As of this year, all Edinburgh Festival Fringe venues who are members of the Green Arts Initiative have a ‘badge’ on their EdFringe.com listing. Check out examples including Assembly HallPleasance Courtyard and Greenside!

Other Campaigns and Initiatives

The Fringe Swap Shop
Hosted at Fringe Central on the last three days of the festival, this initiative encourages companies to donate good-quality props, costumes and materials which would otherwise be discarded at the end of a show run – enabling them to be reused or recycled! With a ‘bring what you have; take what you want’ approach, anyone is able to collect items during the Swap Shop, and we have a case study on how it works!

The Fringe Food Bank
Run by comedian Simon Caine, and a variety of partners and venues, this initiative encourages participating companies to donate leftover food and period products before they leave Edinburgh, with the supplies redistributed to the local community in need.

The #SustainableFringe campaign
New for 2018, this campaign seeks to encourage ‘performers, punters ad planners’ to take on three challenges for a more sustainable Edinburgh Festival Fringe experience.

Shows and Performances

One of the unusual things about the Edinburgh Festival Fringe is its uncurated nature: any company wishing to put on a show is able to do so, and there is no artistic director. Of course, with over 3,500 shows across a huge range of genres, it can be difficult to choose what to see, and know how to identify productions with environmental or sustainability content. However, each year there are productions with themes of climate change, sustainability and nature.

Here at Creative Carbon Scotland we’ve identified our first pick of the shows on offer this year!

Cabaret

  • Anya Anastasia: The Executioners 1 – 26 Aug / 8pm / Gilded Balloon Teviot
    “Award-winning musical-comedy maverick Anya Anastasia brandishes her razor-sharp satirical wit…attacks on ecological screwups, techno obsessives and self-congratulatory slacktivist keyboard warriors.”

Children’s Shows

  • The Adventures of Sam Swallow 2 – 27 Aug / 11.45am / C Venues – C Too
    A new play for children and families about the beauty of nature and our need to protect it, brought to life through music, dance and puppetry.
  • The Garden of Delight 31 Jul – 19 Aug (not 15, 16, 17) / 2pm / Duddingston Kirk Manse Gardens
    “We have a simple environmental message: look after our world before people destroy it forever. The children journey back in time with Tumshie the jester joining the inhabitants of the garden with music and singing along the way.”

Comedy

  • Luke Rollason’s Planet Earth 2 – 26 (not 15) / 2.30pm / Monkey Barrel Comedy Club
    Set in a future where our worst predictions came true – following ecological collapse, thousands of endangered species are extinct, including the BBC. But one plucky (and unpaid) intern isn’t giving up, and right on programming schedule, we’re getting series three.
  • Lucy Porter: Pass It On 1 – 26 Aug (not 13, 20) / 5.30pm / Pleasance Courtyard
    Musings on what we receive from our ancestors and what we pass on to future generations. Lucy’s inherited dodgy knees and global warming from her parents, but can she leave a better legacy for her children?
  • Matt Winning: Climate Strange 2-26 Aug (not 13) / 5pm / Just the Tonic at The Mash House
    Dr Matt Winning is thinking about starting a family but wonders if he should. A show about why our knowledge about climate change doesn’t necessarily match our actions.

Dance, Physical Theatre and Circus

  • The Grey Life 19 – 27 Aug / 7.10pm / C Venues – C Royale
    “Open the window, take a breath – outside it’s grey. The world is polluted. We produce, we consume, we waste and we are never satisfied. How does our globalised world work?” A documentary-dance-theatre-film.

Events

We’re a bit biased on this one: we’re hosting it! Taking place at Fringe Central (the home of support for participants) it’s a celebration of the community of practitioners and venues practising sustainability at the Fringe.

Exhibitions

  • Nàdar / Prakriti 3 – 27 Aug/ 10am -6pm Tu/Th/Fri/Sat; 2pm – 6pm Wed / Edinburgh Printmakers
    Through new print commissions, Ravi Agarwal responds to current conversations about rural and urban sustainability and the various challenges posed to nature in Scotland and India. Partnership support from the John Muir Trust. We’re running a Green Tease discussion around this exhibition in July.
  • Reuse, Reinvent, Reimagine Opening party 10 Aug / 7pm / Gallery 23
    This art exhibition highlights the inability of humankind to effectively cope with the disposal of the vast amounts of household and industrial waste and the destruction of the natural world for profit.
  • Go Wild on the National Cycle Network Photo Exhibition 6-31 Aug / 8am – 7pm / Lochrin Basin
    The National Cycle Network (NCN) is a series of traffic-free paths and quiet, on-road cycling and walking routes that connect to every major town and city in Scotland. A collection of photographs curated by active travel charity, Sustrans.

Music, Musicals and Opera

  • The Great Song Cycle, Song Cycle 13 – 18 Aug / 12.05pm / theSpace @ Surgeons Hall
    A musical memoir about one woman’s solo bicycle/music tour 1,254 miles down the west coast of the USA.
  • World in Progress 13 – 25 (not 19) / 10.20pm / theSpace on North Bridge
    A brand-new musical song-cycle that explores our ever-changing relationship with the earth.

Theatre

  • The Man Who Planted Trees 20 – 27 Aug / 2.30pm / Scottish Storytelling Centre
    Multi award-winning adaptation of Jean Giono’s classic environmental tale by Edinburgh-based Puppet State Theatre Company. A previous winner of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award.
  • Solarplexus: An Alternative Energy Play 3 – 27 Aug (not 13, 20) / 7.35pm / Zoo Carteris
    Corporate surveillance and conspiracies abound in this hyper-speed piece of sustainable sci-fi theatre from NYC.
  • Bottled Up 3 – 18 Aug (not 12) / Times vary / theSpace on North Bridge
    This funny solo show explores eco-anxiety, our dependency on plastics in day-to-day life and considers the irony of living in a world of plenty.
  • The Handlebards (Twelfth Night and Romeo and Juliet) 22 – 26 Aug / 1pm / Assembly George Square Gardens
    The HandleBards have cycled 1,500 miles from London to Edinburgh, carrying on the back of their bikes all of the set, props and costumes necessary to perform Shakespeare. A previous winner of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award.

If you want to browse your own sustainability selection, take a look on the Edinburgh Festival Fringe website (or use their app!). We’re also always open to new recommendations, so get in touch or submit your event listing if you have a show to share!

Not just the Fringe

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is only one of the major Edinburgh Festivals and it’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to international cultural leadership on environmental sustainability. Take a look at the members of our Green Arts Initiative and our member case studies to find out more.


The post Green Picks and Opportunities of the 2018 Edinburgh Festival Fringe appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Maker Chris Wallace: Fringe Sustainable Practice Award

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Each year Creative Carbon Scotland put a call out through Creative Scotland for a Scottish-based artist or maker to create a unique and sustainable award piece for the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice award. Here we find out a little more about the design process from our commissioned maker.

The commission based opportunity requests makers to experiment with the environmental, social and economic aspects of their work and reflect the inspirations and objectives of the award. This year the commission was awarded to Chris Wallace, a Glasgow-based crafter.

The ‘Green Man’

Chris used the image of the ‘Green Man’, a widely known ancient motif, as the main design element of his award. This commonly uses a face surrounded by leaves, composed of leaves or with leaves surging from the mouth and eyes. This image is commonly associated with natural rebirth and the cycle of natural growth.

Chris said of the image:

“I feel that the image’s link to the idea of recurrence makes it suitable for use in the Sustainable Practice Award. This is because recurrent or circular models of economics offer an alternative to prevalent linear models that currently serve our economy. A circular flow of materials that can be recovered and reused is a clear challenge to the narrow path that leads from manufacturing to disposability. The image acts as a reminder of our undeniable reliance on nature and its example of renewal.”

The core image was structured from reclaimed copper electrical wire which was sourced from a metal reclaiming business in East Kilbride. The wire was then made into the elements of the design and soldered together back in Chris’ studio at the Briggait, Glasgow, home to a host of Green Arts Initiative members. Once the image was complete it was fixed onto roof slate which Chris sourced from the cottage he stayed at in the Cairngorms. To finish the design, the lettering was soldered on once the award’s judges decided on a winner and partner logos were attached to the completed award piece by tin can.

This year’s award was won by Outland Theatre’s production, Towers of Eden, who loved the unique design concept of their award, and here at Creative Carbon Scotland, we were thrilled by Chris’ unique, detailed and thoughtful interpretation and implementation of the design.

You can see more of Chris’ work on his website: http://www.chriswallacework.co.uk/


The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award is a collaboration between its founder, the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), and Creative Carbon Scotland, working in partnership with the List magazine and PR Print & Design.

Each year the award is given to a production that exhibits high quality artistic integrity and engages the company and audiences with the issues of sustainability in all of its forms. It celebrates different approaches to sustainable practice both in content and in the production of shows, and rewards those that take responsibility for their social, environmental and economic impacts and think creatively about how the arts can help grow a sustainable world.

For any further questions please contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com or call the Creative Carbon Scotland office on 0131 529 7909.

 



The post Maker Chris Wallace on crafting the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Winner Announced for 2017 Fringe Sustainable Practice Award

Creative Carbon Scotland and The Center of Sustainable Practice in the Arts announced the winner of the 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award at the Scottish Poetry Library this morning.

Poet Harry Giles presented the winners, Outland Theatre with the award for their 2017 production at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Towers of Eden. Founders of the company, Simon Christian and Melissa Dalton received a hand-crafted piece from Glasgow based designer, Chris Wallace, which was made with reclaimed copper wire and reclaimed roof slate. Ceremony attendees included Fringe participants and others from the Scottish and international cultural and sustainability worlds.

With applications open to all 3,398 shows performing at this year’s Fringe, a high number and quality of applications were received, and whittled down to 18 shortlisted productions, 5 finalists and one overall winner. Judges assessed shows based on their artistic quality as well as their engagement with themes relating to social, economic and environmental sustainability, and sustainable practices they adhered to. This year there were many unique ideas and concepts which engaged audiences, both young and old.

Winner Announced for Fringe Sustainable Practice Award 1The award winner, Outland Theatre’s production of Towers of Eden, portrays a dystopian future where environmental disaster has struck, traditional agriculture is no longer sufficient to feed the ever-growing population and the government offers a solution which becomes corrupt. They convinced judges with their unique concept and gripping theatrics which accurately conveyed their sustainable messages. Moreover, they were conscious of the sustainability of their production by considering the carbon footprint of their show, including the impact of their marketing, travel options and sustainable engagement through a crowd funding initiative to support their trip to Edinburgh.

Ben Twist, Director of Creative Carbon Scotland, said:
“The award recognises the very best in sustainable practice at the world’s largest arts festival, and we hope that it will encourage future performers, producers and venues to consider social, economic and environmental best practice in the future. We’re delighted to be able to present this award, and are enormously grateful to our partners the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts, PR Print and Design, and The List to enable this to happen.”

Four other finalists were also recognised at the ceremony for their significant contribution to sustainable practice at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. These were:
• Home Sweet Garden by Asylon Theatre at Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh – John Hope Gateway
• Last Resort by 2 Magpies Theatre at Summerhall
• Me and My Bee by This Egg and the Pleasance at Pleasance Courtyard
• Tribe by Temper Theatre at Zoo Southside

The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award is a collaboration between its founder, the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), and Creative Carbon Scotland (CCS), working together with the List magazine and supported by PR Print & Design.

Maker Coral Mallow on creating the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award piece

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This post comes from Coral Mallow: the artist we commissioned this summer to craft the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award. Here’s what she has to say about her process.

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe! It is an exciting time to be in the city with it’s candy wrapper costume of theatre posters and the possibility of art literally and figuratively around every corner and close. For an entire month!

With such an extensive celebration however comes much waste in promotion, tourism, and production needs. Rather than approach this issue negatively Creative Carbon Scotland chose to create an award to congratulate those productions that had a combination of low environmental impact and innovative production speaking to sustainability problems and solutions.

Hence we come to the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award. This is a collaboration between Creative Carbon Scotland and the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts. To further keep with the theme of this award they decided to put out a call to hire a local Artist/Maker to create the award. This is where I come in.

My name is Coral Mallow and I’m here to tell you about the making and thought process behind the creation of the 2016 award.

When I applied for the commission I was already thinking of some things that I would have to keep in mind. The performance that won might not be local as we get troupes and performers from all over the world. As anyone who has flown lately knows weight restrictions on luggage get stricter all the time, so creating something lighter as an award would probably be preferable. As such, the performer that won might not be in Edinburgh at the time of the award giving so it would make it easier to transport or mail as well.

I also looked into the award created last year by maker Sarah Diver so also knew I would have to add logos and text. This meant I had to consider a way to accurately and clearly present that information. It also meant that it had to be separate of the body of the piece because the maker would only find out about the winner a week before the ceremony. All of this information was key to my proposal.

While I work in many different mediums I chose to weave this award using a technique called twill inlay. Twill inlay allows you to create a design in a weaving by adding additional yarn to a pattern by hand. Here is a youtube link to a weaver who demonstrates the technique also using four shaft floor loom. I have a background in theatre as both performer and playwright so I looked to the history of theatre to inform my material choices. I chose to use rescued and reclaimed linen and wool yarns to create the body or the award which could then be displayed either flat or hung on the wall. The text pieces would be added and attached by hand using embroidery.

EFAVou

To capture the text in clarity I chose to use the services of a local women owned company in Leith called BeFabBeCreative. Using digital printing may not sound sustainable, but when you take into consideration the lack of solvents, the small business commitment to recycling, and the locality allowing me to collect via walking or bus it is an excellent option! They created the digital prints on a cotton fabric that mirrored the pattern I would be using in the weaving. The proprietors Solii and Zoe were very excited and helpful in getting the cloth printed, prepared, and to me in time for me to complete the piece for the award ceremony. The three pictures above are three of the digital designs created in photoshop that were printed and used.

Textile waste is a huge problem with a significant portion of our landfills being clothing, carpets, household soft goods such as sheets and towels and more all contribute to a growing issue around sustainability. There is a tendency towards mass disposal of materials and props during large festivals. Depending on how far some acts have traveled, and what they wish to bring home, Edinburgh can wind up with a significant increase in waste.

Artists and theater makers have long been known for their resourcefulness in reusing what society discards. Whether for canvases, costuming, or various assemblages as can be found in sculpture and jewelry, “waste not want not” is the working motto of many a practitioner. By creating a soft textile piece I speak not just to the history of the Arts, but to the Arts long commitment to recycling, upcycling, and industrious innovation.

Congratulations to VOU Fiji Dance for winning the award for their production “Are We Stronger Than Winston?”! It was a delight and an honor to create this award and I hope it brings you as much joy in the having as I had in the creating of it.

The post Maker Coral Mallow on creating the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award piece appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Winner Announced of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award 2016!

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The 2016 EFSPA was announced by the Center of Sustainable Practice In the Arts and Creative Carbon Scotland at a ceremony at the Festival Theatre on Friday August 26th.

The award, celebrating sustainable design, content and production at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, was given to VOU Fiji Dance for their production Are We Stronger Than Winston?, performed at Greenside @ Nicolson Square.

A representative of the company received the award piece, created by local maker Coral Mallow, and presented by comedian Holly Burn, who hosted the event. Other speakers included Brendan Miles from the List magazine, Ian Garrett from the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts and Phil Brady from PR Print and Design.

Are We Stronger Than Winston?  was created in response to the cyclone Winston, which devastated the South Pacific Islands in February this year. The dance piece depicts the horrors of the natural disaster, as well as the locals’ resilience in dealing with the strongly-felt impacts of climate change. They convinced the judges with this direct approach to the theme of sustainability in its form of human adaptation to a changing environment, as well as their excellent and moving performance. Moreover, they are conscious of their carbon emissions through travel and aimed to offset this by planting trees in their homeland. The company concluded their spring European Tour with the Edinburgh Festival Fringe run, appearing at Greenside @ Nicolson Square from August 5th to August 13th. In the company’s words:

Are We Stronger Than Winston

Fiji is my home, my land… my interconnected relationship of unconditional love and protection. But my land is disappearing. When it is gone, I am gone. But I refuse to die; I will fight! I am reclaiming ownership of my existence – as a people and a land. Fighting to save the land of my birth!’

VOU Fiji Dance emerged as the winner from a highly competitive field. With more applications than ever before, the judges agreed to shortlist 24 productions and choose 7 finalists. This unusually large selection reflected the high quality of the productions as well as their scope across all areas of sustainability. Judges assessed shows based on their artistic quality, their engagement with themes relating to social, economic and environmental sustainability, and their thoughtfulness around decisions relating to sustainable practice.

The full shortlist can be found here.

The other shows making it to the finalist stage were revealed at the ceremony to be (in alphabetical order):

  • Bird, Sita Pieraccini in association with Feral

For expressing the fragility of life in a dangerous environment through consistently expressive physical movement, sound and high production values. Engages by provoking questions rather than providing answers.

  • Eden, Less Theatre

For its intentional and considered use of found objects in a way that transforms them into magical characters and for making a strong connection with the environment and waste as exhibited in material choices.

For its exploration of a future where climate change has restricted our travel and lives, and the emotional impact of such a societal shift. A production where the ramifications of living unsustainably were at the heart of the plot.

For using delightful and inventive upcycled puppetry to explore the human role in nature, and the importance of harmony in the world. It created an approachable context for children to understand the cycles of nature, and our need for it.

  • World Without Us, Ontroerend Goed, Theatre Royal Plymouth, Vooruit, Richard Jordan Productions

For a purely executed, uncompromising look at human transience and how that manifests in the unsustainability of our built world.

For their continued excellenve and ambition both concerning artistic vision and sustainable practice of the company itself. Having won the award in 2014 and being shortlisted several times, they received a special commendation for their continued achievements.

Holly Burn introducing the awards

Each year the award is given to a production that exhibits high quality artistic integrity and engages the company and audiences with the issues of sustainability in all of its forms. It celebrates different approaches to sustainable practice both in content and in the production of shows, and rewards those that take responsibility for their social, environmental and economic impacts and think creatively about how the arts can help grow a sustainable world.

The award for Sustainable Practice at the Fringe was first launched in 2010 Previous recipients include:  The Pantry Shelf , produced by Team M&M at Sweet Grassmarket; Allotment, produced by nutshell productions at the Inverleith Allotments in co-production with Assembly; The Man Who Planted Trees, produced by the Edinburgh’s Puppet State Theatre; How to Occupy an Oil Rig, by Daniel Bye and Company, produced by Northern Stage; The Handlebards: A Comedy of Errors/Macbeth, produced by Peculius at the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh and Lungs, by Paines Plough at Roundabout at Summerhall.


The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award is a collaboration between its founder, the Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts (CSPA), and Creative Carbon Scotland (CCS), working together with media partner the List magazine and sponsor PR Print & Design, supported by the Arts & Business Scotland’s New Arts Sponsorship Grants programme.

Ian Garrett and Miranda Wright founded the CSPA in early 2008. The organization provides a network of resources to arts organizations, which enables them to be ecologically and economically sustainable while maintaining artistic excellence. Past and Present partnerships have included the University of Oregon, Ashden Directory, Arcola Theatre, Diverseworks Artspace, Indy Convergence, York University, LA Stage Alliance and others.

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. CCS believes cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

Image credit Gemma Lawrence for Creative Carbon Scotland and VOU Fiji Dance

The post Winner Announced of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award 2016! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award Ceremony

The Ceremony

The ceremony will take place in the Lafayette Bar (1st floor) in the Festival Theatre: a year roundGreen Arts Initiative venue and host for Edinburgh International Festival events during August.

Taking the form of a celebratory breakfast reception, the ceremony will start at 10:30am and tea, coffee and pastries will be provided.

All applicants to the award are invited to attend, as are all those interested in arts and sustainability on show at the world’s largest arts festival!

The Award

The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award was established in 2010 by Center for Sustainable Practice In the Artsand is now run as a joint initiative between the Canadian organisation and Creative Carbon Scotland, in partnership with The List magazine and PR Print & Design.

Each year the award is given to a company or individual at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe that has created a high-quality production that thinks creatively about sustainability and engages their audiences with the issue, from sustainability-driven content to elements of sustainable production. Social, economic, and environmental sustainability dimensions are considered, as well as the content and technical production of the show.

Previous recipients include:

  • The Pantry Shelf, produced by Team M&M at Sweet Grassmarket;
  • Allotment by Jules Horne and directed by Kate Nelson, produced by nutshell productions at the Inverleith Allotments in co-production with Assembly;
  • The Man Who Planted Trees adapted from Jean Giono’s story by Ailie Cohen, Richard Medrington, Rick Conte and directed by Ailie Cohen, produced by Puppet State Theatre;
  • How to Occupy an Oil Rig by Daniel Bye;
  • Comedy of Errors and Macbeth by The HandleBards/Peculius at the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh;
  • Lungs by Duncan Macmillan, by Paines Plough at Roundabout

Applications to the award are open until 12 August, and productions can apply here.

Click here for more information about environmental sustainability at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/edinburgh-fringe-sustainable-practice-award-award-ceremony-tickets-26803228177?aff=es2

Changing the Culture: Festivals Working for a Sustainable Future

Do you want to know more about how festivals directors and organisers can tackle the complex aspects of sustainability? At this event we’ll hear stories and ideas from the Edinburgh International Science Festival (the world’s first science festival) and Imaginate (Scotland’s international festival of performing arts for children and young people).

The Event

Creative Carbon Scotland is delighted to bring discussions about sustainability to the participants of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. We are hosting Paul Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of Imaginate, and Amanda Tyndall, Creative Director of the Edinburgh International Science Festival, to discuss how they have been tackling the issue of sustainability in the arts.

From content and audience travel to operational design and waste disposal, festivals face a difficult task if they strive to be more environmentally sustainable. If one also into account the ideas of economic and social sustainability, it becomes clear that this is a difficult challenge that requires creativity, flexibility and constant review.

Come and join us on 11 August from 4pm to 5.30pm for presentations from our speakers on their respective strategies, the challenges they have faced and overcome, and where they think their future lies.

Tea and coffee will be provided. This event is part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe’s Fringe Central Event Programme for participants at the Edinburgh Fringe and is free to attend, but ticketed: get your tickets here.

Speakers

Amanda Tyndall will be speaking for the Edinburgh International Science Festival, the largest science festival in the UK, established in 1989. Their programme includes everything from discussions, workshops and performances to science themed parties and experimental food events. This year, the festival chose to host events under the theme “Building Better Worlds” this year, with significant inclusion of sustainability topics.

Paul Fitzpatrick joins us from Imaginate, a festival striving to ensure that children and young people in Scotland have regular access to high quality performing arts experiences. The Imaginate Festival has established itself as one of the best places for programmers from all over the world to see children and young people’s work of the very highest standard.  It has also become a place where artists meet, to see and discuss work and take part in professional development activities.

Both the Edinburgh International Science Festival and Imaginate are part of Festivals Edinburgh, which brings together a total of 12 festivals in the Scottish capital city which work together as well as individually on new ideas and approaches to sustainability. Sharing an environmental policy, they are both members of the Green Arts Initiative.

Get your tickets here

PR Print and Design is Supporting Our Green Arts Sector

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re proud to announce that we have partnered with PR Print and Design as our sponsor for this year’s Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award and the Green Arts Initiative, and have been awarded a New Arts Sponsorship Grant to help grow our work towards a green arts sector!

We’re excited to be partnering with an organisation whose aims also serve the development towards a more sustainable Scotland, through its commitment to carbon neutral printing. This sponsorship will serve to grow the scale and quality of our work across the sector.

The partnership will see PR Print and Design become the first ever sponsor of these initiatives, both encouraging and enabling local, national and international arts organisations to make sustainable printing choices when considering the marketing and promotion of their productions. Funded by the Scottish Government, and administered by Arts and Business Scotland (themselves committed to improving environmental sustainability) the New Arts Sponsorship Grant scheme encourages private sector sponsorship of cultural activities in Scotland by offering matched funding to cultural organisations securing sponsorship from eligible businesses.

Established in 1987, and based in Glasgow, PR Print and Design is passionate about sustainable supply chains, renewable energy and carbon reduction. Generating over 80% of their own energy from 192 solar panels on their building roof, and with a waste recycling rate of over 96%,

The company is committed to enhancing sustainability in their own operations, as much as those of all they work with. For each order, any unavoidable carbon emissions are offset through a certificated carbon neutral partner scheme, with a certificate and official branding supplied to the ordering organisation.

Creative Carbon Scotland first came across PR Print and Design as a customer of their print work, and were impressed by their carbon-neutral production of our annual Green Arts Initiative report. Being able to highlight our environmental commitment through our own sustainable procurement choices is a key part of our operations.

PR Print and Design offers a variety of printing services for arts organisations, including:

  • Posters A4 to 60x 40
  • Flyers and leaflets
  • Postcards
  • Programmes
  • Tickets
  • Exhibition stands and boards

To find out more about sustainable print for the arts sector get in contact with Phil Brady: phil@prprint.net

More information about the New Arts Sponsorship Grants can be found on the Arts & Business Scotland website.

The post PR Print and Design is Supporting Our Green Arts Sector appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico