Yearly Archives: 2020

Brave New Decade

By Joan Sullivan

This is our decade.

By “our”, I mean everyone: all consumers, all professions, all industries, all nations, all beliefs. As Roddy Clarke articulated so passionately in his recent Forbes article The Twenties – The Most Important Design Decade Yet, “We have one common denominator: the power to create change. And, through courage, collaboration and co-operation, we can achieve this.”

Clarke describes, among other things, the Duke of Cambridge’s recently announced The Earthshot Prize, the multi-million pound prize that will be awarded to five winners per year over the next ten years. By 2030, the Earthshot Prize intends to provide at least 50 solutions to the world’s greatest problems.

According to its website, the Earthshot Prize wants:

to motivate and inspire a new generation of thinkers, leaders and dreamers. Our prizes will reward progress across all sectors of industry and society, not just technology. The prizes could be awarded to a wide range of individuals, teams or collaborations – scientists, activists, economists, leaders, governments, banks, businesses, cities, and countries – anyone who is making a substantial development or outstanding contribution to solving our environmental challenges.

The Earthshot Prize is inspired by the concept of moonshots, in reference to U.S. President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 moonshot speech about “landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth” before the end of that anxious decade. This historic speech unleashed a decade of unprecedented innovation and collaboration that inspired a whole generation. Despite technological challenges, political obstacles and naysayers, Kennedy’s audacious dream was achieved within nine short years, even though he did not live to witness its moment of glory.

Kennedy’s generation achieved the impossible, in less than a decade. We can do the same. We must do the same. This is our decade.

Which is why, for my inaugural post of this brave new decade, I am inspired to write about a woman whose audacious vision has the potential to radically transform our lives and our homes before the end of this anxious decade.

Meet Dr. Rachel Armstrong, the pioneering architectural designer, synthetic biologist, and sustainability innovator who is blurring the lines between art, architecture and science in her quest for alternative technological platforms to solve third millennium challenges.

“The fundamental units of design must be reconsidered,” Armstrong argued during her 2019 talk at Design og arkitektur Norge in Oslo. “The fusion of biology, technology and art speaks of different kinds of beginnings, where we can imagine, build and explore futures that may one day entirely wean us off our umbilical attachment to fossil fuels while diversifying the metabolic richness and flourishing on earth.”

Originally trained as a medical doctor at Cambridge, Armstrong earned a PhD in Architecture at University College London. She is currently Professor of Experimental Architecture at the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, where she founded and directs the Experimental Architecture Group. She is also Coordinator of the multi-country Living Architecture Project, funded in part by the European Union. Her collaborative work has been exhibited widely, including major installations at the Venice Art and Architecture Biennales, the Tallinn Architecture Biennale, the Trondheim Art Biennale, the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, and the Whitechapel Gallery in London, among others.

Known by her popular Twitter handle @LivingArchitect, Armstrong believes that “we are in the midst of a transition from an industrial to an ecological paradigm of architectural practice.” This transition involves, among other things, embracing permeability to allow chemical exchanges between buildings and the natural world, as well as within our living spaces.

The concept of permeability is anathema to the dominant Victorian top-down architectural philosophy, which favors the use of “hard” inert construction materials – masonry, aluminum, glass – to hermetically seal our buildings. Architects choose these energy-intensive inert materials to prevent the outside environment (heat, cold, precipitation, dust, pollution, disease) from getting inside.

“Impermeability was, and is, the driving goal,” Armstrong wrote for FastCompany. But impermeable design has a major flaw: it requires a one-way transfer of energy from the outside environment into our homes and cities, followed by a one-way transfer of unprocessed waste products back out into the environment.

New research suggests, however, that these waste products can become a source of renewable energy for buildings. Armstrong and her Living Architecture colleagues propose an alternative technological platform that can holistically recycle, re-use and reintegrate household waste products in a variety of new contexts. This technology has been around for 3.6 billion years: life itself.

“We are blind to the incredible work that nature does!” Armstrong exclaimed during her Oslo talk. She is convinced that the only way “to construct genuinely sustainable homes and cities is by connecting them to nature, not insulating them from it.”

In its earliest stages of experimental evolution, the Living Architecture project successfully demonstrated the potential of using semi-permeable “living bricks” (see image below) to catalyze radically different approaches towards how we think about the nature of our homes, our relationship with microbes, sustainability and resource management.

In an email, Armstrong describes these living bricks as different “species” of bioreactors, e.g., microbial fuel cell, algae bioreactor, genetically modified bioprocessor. When “fed” by human liquid wastes (notably urine and grey water), the resident microbes living within the different bioreactors are programmed to perform different “household chores” such as removing organic matter from wastewater, generating oxygen, making usable biomass (fertilizer) and producing clean electricity.

Moreover, since each bioreactor performs a different task, their end products can feed each other. For example, the production of electricity within the microbial fuel cell can be boosted by oxygen from green algae in the photobioreactor system. These products can either be fed back into the household system, or released as nutrient-rich streams back into the natural environment to increase soil fertility in our cities.

Future iterations of “living brick” technologies could transform our homes and commercial spaces into environmentally sensitive, renewable production sites. For example, interior wall partitions in our bathrooms and kitchens could be replaced with bioreactor walls (see video below) that can “recycle detergents from domestic wastewater, produce fertilizers for the garden, and synthesize new, biodegradable detergents – just from grey water, carbon dioxide and sunlight,” Armstrong wrote. In these scenarios, cleaned water will be recycled back into our bathrooms and kitchens to reduce overall water consumption, while zero-carbon electricity will charge our portable devices.

According to Armstrong,

Future bioreactors could generate bioluminescent lighting, produce nutrient-rich food supplements, and remove problematic estrogen-mimic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from drinking water. In commercial spaces, these living walls could recycle water, fertilize green roofs, and purify air to make building interiors healthier and more like natural environments.

“The home of the future isn’t smart, it’s living and green,” claims the headline of a recent article in the SingularityHub. Another article describes five ways that buildings of the future will use biotech that may ultimately wean us off fossil fuels: 1) buildings that grow; 2) buildings that heal; 3) buildings that breathe; 4) buildings with immune systems; 5) buildings with stomachs.

For example, Living Architecture researchers intend to install integrated bioreactor walls – designed to function like a cow’s stomach – in real homes by 2030.

It may all sound like science fiction, but these are the kinds of bold, cross-disciplinary, solutions-oriented initiatives that will surely be recognized by the Earthshot Prize in the coming decade.

In my next post on this same subject, I will explore the role of artists collaborating with Living Architecture scientists to re-introduce microbes back into our homes, our buildings and our cities.

(Top image: Rachel Armstrong and Cécile B. Evan’s installation “999 years 13sqm (the future belongs to ghosts)” at Whitechapel Gallery’s Is This Tomorrow 2019 exhibit. All images from the Living Architecture project reprinted with permission by Rachel Armstrong.)

This article is part of the Renewable Energy series.

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Joan Sullivan is a Canadian photographer focused on the energy transition. Her renewable energy photographs have been exhibited in group and solo shows in Canada, the UK and Italy. She is currently working on a documentary film and photo book about Canada’s energy transition. In her monthly column for Artists and Climate Change, Joan shines a light on global artists, designers and architects experimenting with renewable energy as an emerging art form. You can find Joan on TwitterVisura and Ello.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Creative engagement with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project

This February Creative Carbon Scotland will travel to the Outer Hebrides in the North West of Scotland to support a series of workshops seeking community input into the development of the first ever marine conservation plan for the region.

Last year we partnered up with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project to support the inclusion of a creative approach to engaging communities in the Outer Hebrides. This was to establish what’s important to residents about their seas and how Marine Protected Areas could help to deliver benefits for people and nature. We’re happy to be joining the team again in the next round of events taking place across Lewis, Harris, North and South Uist and Barra.

Seas of the Outer Hebrides

The Seas of the Outer Hebrides project is working directly with communities and marine users to identify the best way to manage Marine Protected Areas in the region for the benefit of people and nature.

Over the coming years the project will deliver a regional management plan for the Outer Hebrides Marine Region, putting communities and people at the heart of the process and building consensus on the future management of Marine Protected Areas in the islands.

A key aim of the project is to build a shared vision for Marine Protected Areas in the region. Creative Carbon Scotland is proud to be supporting this by involving artists and creative practices to help explore the cultural dimension of resident’s relationship to their seas.

Upcoming events

In these upcoming events we’re pleased to be working with artists, Kirsty O’Connor (North Uist) and Sandra Kennedy (Lewis), who are supporting the design and delivery of the workshops alongside the Seas of the Outer Hebrides team combining different visual arts methods with group discussions and mapping activities during the events.

Events schedule

  • South Uist – Talla Chidhe, Lochboisdale – Friday 7th February
  • Barra – Castlebay College – Saturday 8th February
  • North Uist – Lochmaddy Village Hall – Monday 10th February
  • Harris – Leverburgh Village Hall – Monday 10th February
  • Uig, Lewis – Uig Community Centre – Tuesday 11th February
  • Stornoway, Lewis – An Lanntair – Wednesday 12th February

These events are aimed primarily at island residents but if you have any questions or would like to find out more about Creative Carbon Scotland’s involvement in the project please contact Gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com  You can learn more about the Seas of the Outer Hebrides on the project website. 


The post Creative engagement with the Seas of the Outer Hebrides project appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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ecoartspace – Open Call for Writers

ecoartspace is looking for writers to review exhibitions of work that addresses environmental issues for our new blog (and website to launch soon). We are also interested in writings on the state of the environment, the science of climate change, and alternative approaches to mediating the climate crisis. Feel free to message us here on Facebook, or you can email info@ecoartspace.org.

Opportunity: Hidden doors commission – Traquair Maze

Up to five commissions available to create hidden doors in the Traquair Maze.

Traquair’s Maze is the largest hedged maze in Scotland and was planted in 1981. It covers approximately ¼ acre and is planted with a mix of Cyprus Leylandi and beech. It is visited by thousands of adults and children every year and is one of the main attractions at Traquair.

Proposal

We would like to commission up to five hidden “doors” in the Traquair Maze to add another intriguing dimension and a further element of surprise.

We invite artists/designers to design and install some innovative doorways in the Maze. The doors would be inserted into the hedge structure and would provide a short cut, or not, to the footpath on the other side.

The doorways could be either proper working doors or perhaps false doors, tiny doors or natural doorways. However, it is envisaged that the majority of these doorways will be permanent fixtures so artists should bear in mind the materials used should be sustainable and also that this is a public space so designs should be able to withstand use by children and not present any dangers.

The theme of “hidden histories” will be explored in 2020 as Traquair’s own history is filled with secrets and the concept of hiding and disguise was a necessity due to the family’s allegiance to the Jacobite cause and as Roman Catholics they were forced to hide their religious beliefs and political allegiances.

Fee

4/5 commissions are available – each receiving a fee of £1000.

Timescale

Applications will close on Friday 10th April 2020.
Implementation and installation over the summer months with opening planned in September. There will be an opportunity to exhibit your work and developments for this project in the Pavillion Galleries at Traquair.

How to Apply

Please email Catherine Maxwell Stuart and include:
Reasons for your interest in this project and how it relates to your current practice;
An outline vision of your idea for the project
Please also include:
• Your CV/artist statement
• Four examples of your recent work
• Website/online links to view your work

The post Opportunity: Hidden doors commission – Traquair Maze appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Freelance Exhibitions Photographer Call-Out

Edinburgh Printmakers are looking for exhibition/installation/architectural/events photographers with a proven track record of being able to construct high-quality images that document the atmosphere and presence of exhibitions and details of artwork within.

Job summary

Edinburgh Printmakers are a major contemporary arts space and one of primary centres for print in Europe. We function to support and facilitate artists and creative practitioners. We engage wide audiences in beautiful critically engaged exhibitions and contemporary print practice in our year-round programmes of exhibitions, events and educational experiences.

We are looking to build relationships with photographers based in Edinburgh, Lothians, Scotland and beyond who can capture the essence of exhibitions and associated events in compelling images. We ask interested individuals to share their portfolio of relevant images, and their day/half day rate, with the intention to match you with projects that would benefit from your style and ability as a documentation photographer.

We require photographers to take images of artistic installationsobjects and exhibitions, as well as documentation of people engaging in creative settings and events. We want to work with photographers who will use their artistic and technical skills to create images that are appropriate to the work, within existing compositions and with the ability to work with natural light-conditions where necessary. Applicants should have skills in retouching.

Own studio/lighting equipment preferred.

Please submit your portfolio, rates and any additional relevant information to Judith Liddle by 10am Tuesday 18th February.

The post Opportunity: Freelance Exhibitions Photographer Call-Out appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Ecological City: Art & Climate Solutions – Panel & Planning Meeting

Date And Time

Wed, February 5, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EST
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Location

Loisaida, Inc.
710 East 9th Street 
New York, NY 10009 
United States 
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Join Ecological City: A Cultural & Climate Solutions Project engaging the #LowerEastSide community through creative #collaborativearts strategies to bring together and celebrate #climatesolutions and ecological #sustainability initiatives throughout the #communitygardens, neighborhood and #EastRiverPark #waterfront on the #LowerEastSide of #NYC.

Share ideas, brainstorm and and collaborate co-creating the Ecological City: Procession for Climate Solutions at the ECOLOGICAL CITY – PLANNING MEETING

Find out how to participate in #EcologicalArtsWorkshops from February 29 – May 6 every Wednesday 6-9pm and Saturday 12-4pm creating spectacular giant puppets, costumes and performances exploring local sustainability sites and climate solution initiatives.

Groups and organizations are invited to create groups arts projects.
Visual arts and performance projects created through the workshops are presented in the culminating Ecological City: Procession for Climate Solutions on Saturday May 9, 2020 with 20 sites performances celebrating climate solutions and ecological sustainability initiatives throughout community gardens, neighborhood and East River Park waterfront on the Lower East Side.

MORE INFORMATION: www.earthcelebrations.comFB Message: Earth Celebrations-Ecological and Social Change through the Arts
Earth Celebrations’ Ecological City: Cultural & Climate Solutions Action Project in partnership with LUNGS (Loisaida Urban Neighborhood Gardens – representing 48 Lower East Side Gardens), Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, NYC Community Garden District, Green Map, East Village Community Coalition, Lower East Side Girls Club, University Settlement, Educational Alliance, Sixth Street Community Center, Loisaida Inc. Center, GOLES,, East River Park Coalition, East River Alliance, East River Park Action, Friends of Corlears Hook Park, Lower East Side Ecology, Solar One, Waterfront Alliance, Gaia Institute, FABnyc, Arts Loisaida, 4th Street Block Association, Times Up, Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, One Brick, PS364-Earth School, Childrens Workshop School, New School/Parsons, Hunter College-School of Community Organizing and NYU.

REGISTER


OrganizerEarth Celebrations Inc.

Organizer of Ecological City: Art & Climate Solutions – Panel & Planning Meeting

Earth Celebrations is a non-profit orgization founded in 1991 on the Lower East Side of New York City to apply the inspirational power of the arts to build community, collaboration and action on climate change, river restoration, waste management and the preservation of species, habitats, community gardens, parks and a healthy urban environment. Earth Celebrations has developed and utilizes collaborative art processes, civic engagement and environmental action to build broad-based coalitions and cross-sector partnerships with local organizations, academic institutions, government agencies, schools, and community residents to generate ecological, policy and social change.

Our pioneering environmental arts programs include the 15-year Save Our Gardens project (1991-2005), which utilized the transformative power of the arts, creating a theatrical Procession to Save Our Gardens to mobilize a coalition effort that led to the preservation of hundreds of community gardens in New York City. The Hudson River Pageant (2009-2012) applied this creative model to engage community in restoration efforts of the Hudson River estuary and waterfront.

Our current Ecological City: Cultural & Climate Solutions Action Project launched in 2018, engages community, through the cultural strategies of arts and collaborative action we have developed over the past 30 years, on climate solution initiatives to mitigate climate and environmental impacts flooding, carbon pollution, run-off, waste and sea-level rise throughout the gardens, neighborhood and waterfront on the LES.

Ecological City engages the community to co-create a public theatrical pageant through 5 months of environmental place-based learning workshops and visual art and performance creation engage participants to explore and celebrate local sustainability sites, connecting climate solution initiatives as a cohesive urban sustainable ecosystem and amplifying their importance to city and global climate challenges.

www.earthcelebrations.com

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS URANIUM FILM FESTIVAL

[This] year, May 21st to 31st 2020 we’re celebrating the 10th birthday of the International Uranium Film Festival (link is external) and we want to bring the best nuclear films and its filmmakers from the last ten years together with new productions to Rio de Janeiro. The venue will be like in the years before the Cinematheque of Rio de Janeiro’s prestigious Modern Art Museum (MAM Rio) (link is external). Already more than 25 awarded filmmakers and producers from 12 countries agreed to come to Rio in 2020. 

NUCLEAR POWER & CLIMATE CHANGE

In addition to the screenings of dozens of nuclear films this in the world unique film festival about the atomic age is planning a powerful panel on one of the most important questions of our time: Climate Change and Nuclear Power. Are nuclear power plants a solution to global warming?

Join us and help the Uranium Film Festival to celebrate its tenth anniversary. Whether you are for or against the use of nuclear power or uranium: Everyone should be aware of the radioactive risks.  Make a mark and contribute to the festival.

ATOMIC FILMS AND FESTIVAL SPONSORS WANTED

The Uranium Film Festival’s call for entries for 2020 is sill open. Filmmakers and producers can send their documentaries, animations, non-fiction or experimental movies until 1 January 2020. In addition the festival invites the media and social or environmentally conscious companies as festival sponsors and partners. 

DONATE NOW with PayPal

AN UNLIKELY IDEA BECOMES A BIG SUCCESS (LINK IS EXTERNAL)

„We founded the International Uranium Film Festival in 2010 just a few months before Fukushima especially to ensure that atomic disasters such as Chernobyl or the horror of nuclear bomb  attacks and nuclear bomb tests are not forgotten nor repeated,” recalls festival director Norbert G. Suchanek. „When we published our first call for entry, very surprisingly one of the first productions we received and awarded was the extraordinary short film Atomic Bombs On The Planet Earth(link is external) by Peter Greenaway. Since that we have shown more than 200 nuclear films from around the globe until today.”

The first edition of the International Uranium Film Festival was held in May 2011 in Rio de Janeiro. Since that it became quickly the world’s premier annual film event about nuclear power and all radioactive risks, from uranium mining to nuclear waste, from Hiroshima to Fukushima.It is today a global event highlighting nuclear awareness. Uranium Film Festival were organized already in 7 countries more than 40 cities around the globe, from Rio(link is external) to Berlin(link is external), Washington DC, New York(link is external)Hollywood(link is external)Santa Fe(link is external)Window Rock,(link is external) New Delhi,(link is external) Mumbai, Amman, Quebec(link is external) and Montreal; from Brazil to Germany, USA, India(link is external), Portugal, Jordan(link is external) and Canada. And film journalists already called it the “Atomic Cannes”(link is external).

MAM Rio Uranium Film Festival - Director Marcia Gomes

Márcia Gomes de Oliveira, Uranium Film Festival co-founder & executive director in front of the Modern Art Museum of Rio (MAM Rio).(link is external)

Every penny collected during this campaign will be used to organize the film festival and to bring as many filmmakers as possible to Rio. The more support we get the more filmmakers we can invite and the better and the more impact will have the festival to achieve one of our major goals: nuclear awareness. Any additional funds beyond that goal will help us to organize the festival in other locations too. Like in the years before, further Uranium Film Festivals are also planned in other countries like USA, Germany (Berlin), Portugal, Spain and Greenland. Environmental conscious people and nuclear activists around the world are eager to have the Uranium Film Festival in their country to support their nuclear campaigns against (for example) planned uranium mines like in Spain and Greenland or for the clean-up of abandoned uranium mines in the USA or Portugal.

DONATE NOW with PayPal

French-Canadian Actress (link is external) Karine Vanasse (link is external) attending the International Uranium Film Festival 2015 in Quebec. (link is external)

What others are saying

Students of Rio de Janeiro’s State school FAETEC Adolpho Bloch for film, TV, Event & Dance: Opening of the Uranium Film Festival at Modern Art Museum (MAM Rio) (link is external)

In Rio de Janeiro the Uranium Film Festival is supported since 2011 by the Rio de Janeiro’s FAETEC State school for film, cinema, TV, dance and events (Adolpho Bloch). FAETEC students serve also as festival volunteers. During the festival they can practice their skills and meet international filmmakers and producers. Further supporters are the Cinematheque of Rio’s Modern Art Museum (MAM Rio), the local bars and restaurants in Santa Teresa, Bar do Mineiro, Armazém São Thiago e Esquina de Santa and Rio de Janeiro’s best cachaça producer Cachaça Magnífica.

Uranium Film Festival Rio Volunteers and directors

Photo: Festival volunteers and the founders of the Uranium Film Festival in the centre.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR DONATION AND SUPPORTING THE FESTIVAL. 

Marcia Gomes de Oliveira and Norbert G. Suchanek
Founder and directors of the Uranium Film Festival

DONATION VIA BANK TRANSFER TO

Name: Norbert Suchanek / Uranium Film Festival
Bank: GLS Gemeinschaftsbank Bochum / Germany
BIC: GENODEM1GLS
IBAN: DE80 4306 0967 7007 8348 00

Please contact us for general information and sponsorship
International Uranium Film Festival
Rua Monte Alegre 356 / 301Santa Teresa / Rio de Janeiro / RJ
CEP 20240-195   /  Brasil
www.uraniumfilmfestival.org
Email: info@uraniumfilmfestival.org (link sends e-mail)

See also our Crowdfunding Campaign! (link is external)

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/10th-international-uranium-film-festi…(link is external)