Yearly Archives: 2020

Tiny Coronavirus Stories: ‘We will know someone’

By Chantal BilodeauChari ArespacochagaLinda ThomasLisa Schantl.

Reader-submitted stories of the COVID-19 pandemic, in no more than 100 words. Read past stories hereSubmit your own here.

CERTAINTY

Working at a long table. A Fabio Mauri work to my right called Director. Am I still a director when theater has been cancelled? Ahead are piles of books. For work, for comfort, for poetry. I look up from the screen and take in the view. Trees and hill and sky. All healing, I hope. Underfoot, Sofia, the newfie, peacefully snoozing. To my left, Tenley. Bravely and generously forging through. She astounds me. Boundlessly. We have adventured, laughed, and cried together. Now, we are bewildered and scared. Together. Certain only of our love. That is enough. That is the poetry.

— Chari Arespacochaga (Beacon, New York)

(Top image: The view and book spine poetry.)

* * *

PUMPERNICKEL

Pushing carts, we milled around the empty shelves of meat, eggs, bread, when I spotted in a dark display, a loaf of pumpernickel—round, brown as peasant rye, the devil’s farts, my mother used to say. Sandwiches for my daughter’s lunch, a slather of mustard—I set the loaf into my cart and pushed on. Coming towards me, a couple, white, sixties, better than this neighborhood market. The woman said, “Look, no bread.” He grumbled. I pointed to my loaf: “pumpernickel.” A day’s loot. His face twisted with petulance, “What if I don’t like pumpernickel?” And I missed my mother most of all.

— Linda Thomas (Irvine, California)

The loaf, brown as peasant rye.

* * *

IN THIS TOGETHER 

A siren. Sometimes steps in the apartment above me. The sound of water running through pipes because someone flushed a toilet. These are the sounds I hear in the wee hours of the morning when I lie in bed, unable to sleep. I think about how fragile our systems are. How in a matter of weeks, something invisible to the naked eye has essentially shut down the entire world. It’s humbling. But also awe-inspiring. I’ve been more intensely connected to the people around me than ever before, perhaps. We’re in this together. We will get through it together.

— Chantal Bilodeau (New York, New York)

The view from my bedroom window.

* * *

WE WILL KNOW SOMEONE

Yesterday, I phoned my aunt, 68 years old, risk group, to see how she was holding up. She told me that she and her husband, 71, risk group, no longer leave their house. If she remembered anything similar: curfews, hysteric preppers in supermarkets, mass social anxiety; she told me no. Chernobyl: she told me about mushrooms and field plants. Why: she told me that she was twelve when they installed the village’s first landline phone. Then she asked me if I remembered him: who? the deceased, the second: no. The shiver in her voice told me that she did.

— Lisa Schantl (Graz, Austria)

Oberlimbach, 2006.

______________________________

This series is edited by Thomas Peterson. One of the editors of Artists & Climate Change, he is also a theatre director and researcher whose work focuses on the climate crisis.

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Tiny Coronavirus Stories: ‘More individuals are falling’

By Mary CamarilloMindi DicksteinPeter GerrardSusan Hoenig.

Reader-submitted stories of the COVID-19 pandemic, in no more than 100 words. Read past stories hereSubmit your own here.

RESET

Rolling change. Cancellations. New challenges. Zooming in. Listening to news. Fearing the worst. Washing hands raw. Stocking up. Bracing. Watching the world stop. Stopping. Breathing. Spreading out into newfound time. Seeing hope. Clear water in the canals in Venice. Fish and birds return. Pollution disappearing. The universe provides a reset button. Pressing it. Now.

— Mindi Dickstein (Bloomingdale, New Jersey)

(Top photo: The universe provides a reset button.)

* * *

POTATOES AND EGGS

By the second grocery store, he’s becoming mildly panicked. “It’s not about running out of supplies,” he’d told his wife. “I just want to see.” “Check for potatoes and eggs,” she says.
He thinks of the son and daughter-in-law working at the hospital. “Stay in medicine,” he’d advised, “it’s a good financial move.” Money. The President’s solution is a tax break. “We don’t need money. We need PPEs,” his son says. Over the phone. Now, it’s only phone and text contact. It strikes him he’s old, suddenly – by the stroke of a mouse on a spreadsheet, 67 and “At Risk.”

— Peter Gerrard (Irvine, California)

Do you want the last egg?

* * *

BIGTOOTH ASPEN

I go to the forest in times of distress. Bigtooth Aspen eyes look out at me in the morning light. I stand in the stillness, almost hearing the summer sounds of the quivering leaves. A moment of interconnection with one tree, a sentinel in the empty understory where more and more individuals are falling. I feel their pain. On this day, I realize the consequences for ourselves and the natural world.

— Susan Hoenig (Princeton, New Jersey)

“Bigtooth Aspen: I am the Earth and the Earth is me,” black walnut ink and acrylic paint, 2020.

* * *

THE KEYS IN THE TIME OF CORONAVIRUS

Despite the declared national emergency, nothing changes in the Florida Keys. We arrive at the Seafood Festival early to avoid the crowd. We sit in the back. The conch ceviche is delicious. The band plays Tom Petty songs as the locals greet each other. “I don’t care. I’m still going to give you a hug.” In the bathroom a woman sighs impatiently as I wash my hands. When I explain I’m singing “Happy Birthday” in my head she says, “Oh that.” We stand for the Pledge of Allegiance, the Lord’s Prayer and the Star-Spangled Banner. Perhaps this will protect us.

— Mary Camarillo (Huntington Beach, California)

Sunday at the Seafood Festival. 

______________________________

This series is edited by Thomas Peterson. One of the editors of Artists & Climate Change, he is also a theatre director and researcher whose work focuses on the climate crisis.

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Tiny Coronavirus Stories: ‘I have never seen her before’

By Andrea LepcioKera McHughLaura RaboudLisa D. Alvarez.

Reader-submitted stories of the COVID-19 pandemic, in no more than 100 words. Read past stories here. Submit your own here.

SCREENS, A WINDOW

Kitchen table. Eyes are stinging. Staring at a screen. Scrolling. Set up an online meeting. No one came. My job just melted away. A plate of half eaten carrots. On the fridge is the new school schedule. My kids are on their hour of free time. My son came home with a basket of everything from school, dumped it here and crawled into bed. My husband is working in the next room. Two screens. His head is in his hands. Out the window, my neighbor is in the sunshine, looking over her balcony. I have never seen her before.

— Laura Raboud (Edmonton, Alberta)

(Top photo: Collage, printed photo, table, chaos.)

* * *

KENTUCKY WONDER

Planting the beans made her feel like a woman in a fairy tale, the German kind, both magical and brutal. She and her son had bought the seeds years ago. They planted one, waited. Then he had taken the plant to school along with a chart marking its growth. She saved the rest. Now he was a senior and she was another kind of senior, which made her vulnerable during this plague. She planted the old beans in cans filled with dirt. She patted each down with a prayer. The day’s rain watered them. What did she have to lose? 

— Lisa D. Alvarez (Silverado, California)

Waiting.

* * *

TOO MANY SHOWERS

How do you explain a pandemic to someone who is developmentally delayed and a little obsessive? He wonders why we can’t go out and why people have stopped visiting. We tell him it’s flu season, and lots of people are just sick and don’t want to get him sick. How long will that ruse last? If we explain in detail, he may start obsessing over the germ issue and possibly never leave the house again. Or obsessing over himself, and going back to six showers a day (after finally getting him down to two). It’s curious. Interesting times, indeed. 

— Kera McHugh (Cumberland, British Columbia)

Here’s our brother, MB.

* * *

LADY LOVES

I used to go to work. That made my dog sad. Now I don’t go to work. This makes my dog happy. It makes me happy, too. My dog and I are together all day long. We do not practice social distancing. We cuddle together on the couch. She sits by my feet while I eat. And we take walks. Oh, our walks. Through the woods, by the sea, around a lake, up a mountain. Time with my dog is the one good thing. Be safe.  

— Andrea Lepcio (Bar Harbor, Maine)

Lady atop Dorr Mountain in Acadia National Park. She is available to lead tours. 

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

An Interview with Laurie Goldman

By Amy Brady

This month, I have for you an interview with Laurie Goldman, the Director of Public Engagement at The ClimateMusic Project, an organization that brings together scientists, composers, musicians, and other creatives to compose and perform music inspired by the science of climate change. They were recently featured in the New York Times and have lots of big plans for the future.

I’ve interviewed dozens of artists since this newsletter began, but never someone who creates climate music. What can music communicate about climate change that perhaps other means of communication can’t? Or put another way, what do you hope audiences take away from The ClimateMusic Project’s compositions and performances?

Music has a way of reaching people on a more emotional level. The ClimateMusic Project aims to leverage the power of music to capture hearts and minds in a way that a scientific article or lecture about climate change cannot. We hope, and have found, that audiences gain new insights from our work and ultimately are motivated to action. Our ultimate goal is actually not to create music, but to inspire action. Along the way, we are proud that we create engaging and compelling performances.

How did The ClimateMusic Project come about?

Our founder, Stephan Crawford, was seeking to figure out a way to communicate science in a more engaging manner. He was concerned that while people knew about the issue of climate change, they did not necessarily appreciate the necessity for urgent action or the fact that they could be part of the solution. Stephan has a musical background and understood the ability of music to affect people so he worked on a concept to use the medium of music to convey science. From there he invited a composer and band as well as a few scientists to a daylong “hack” that ultimately resulted in a composition that incorporated compelling music guided by science.

What genres of music does your group create and perform?

We have three current compositions in very different genres. The first composition, Climate, by composer Erik Ian Walker, is an electronic/symphonic piece that portrays the atmospheric impacts of climate change. Icarus In Flight, composed by Richard Festinger, is a chamber music composition that highlights the human drivers of climate change – fossil fuel use, population growth, and land use change. The most recent piece is a jazz and spoken-word piece by COPUS called What If We…? that portrays sea-level rise and its effect on populations and land. What If We…? features a compelling chorus sung by children: “what if we change?” It’s powerful. As you can see, our compositions are quite diverse – people like to listen to genres they appreciate, and we aim to reach as many people as possible using whatever style resonates.

Our goal is to use music to speak to people in the communities where they live. If that involves hip hop, electronic, country, samba, reggae, or whatever, we want to work with composers in those genres. We are looking to build our portfolio by working with environmentally engaged composers around the world to reach local audiences. In fact, we are developing a methodology so that it will be easier for composers to work with us and our extended team of scientists. However, it is important for the compositions to be guided by the science of climate change.

Can you elaborate on what you mean by “guided by science?”

We have a team of scientists who collaborate to ensure fidelity to the data and the scientific narrative we seek to communicate. Composers have creative freedom within a framework set by our science team. It can be as simple as aligning tempo and pitch to the data and narrative we provide (though that isn’t exactly “simple”) or the collaboration can be more creatively complex. Our piece on sea-level rise featured embedded data sonifications, realistic headlines from 2045, as well as a duel between drums and bass with drums representing the ocean. We work closely with our science advisers to ensure fidelity to the science: the process is very much a collaboration where musicians bring creativity and work with the team to make sure the science is accurately portrayed.

Who are some of your collaborators?

We work with a team of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley and the California Institute of Technology, and the list is expanding. Our chief science adviser is a lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessments of climate change (for which the IPCC has been awarded a Nobel prize). In addition, we have an extended team of more than thirty people focused on visual elements, public outreach, partnership, etc. And we have a stellar Leadership Council from sectors such as business, arts, and public policy that advises us on strategy to build upon our work.

One of our top priorities is motivating action, so we have developed a network of organizations dedicated to making a difference on the issue. Our partners include Cool Effect, the San Francisco Department of the Environment, Interfaith Power & Light, the Global Footprint Network, and Re-volv. They help people learn about the issue, form community around the issue, or engage on projects to mitigate or adapt. We are working to add other partners to our network so we can give people options for action. The last thing we would want to do is get people concerned about climate change but not show them a path for action! We ask audiences to get engaged if they are not already, to do more if they are already taking some action, and to bring their friends if they are already leading in terms of their own activity.

The ClimateMusic Project’s performances often include visual elements. What does this add to the performances?

We include visuals to enhance understanding of the narrative. Climate change is complex and some people are visual learners while others are more auditory learners. Visuals can highlight the data elements, or provide historical and future references. Plus they can add beauty or highlight concern.

We also generally have an opportunity for audience engagement after each performance. That takes different forms but usually includes a chance to interact with our science team, our composers, our action partners and our core team. It helps to build further understanding and also to hash out any anxiety that arises about the future. So far, our compositions have featured two scenarios for the future, one that shows the trajectory if we fail to take sufficient action and a more hopeful scenario the demonstrates what we can achieve if we implement the solutions that are already available. We know that we can work together to make our world a better place for all and we strive to communicate that fact.

What’s next for The ClimateMusic Project? 

We have had quite a few requests for engagement, especially since a profile of our work was highlighted by the New York Times last November. The 50th anniversary of Earth Day is coming up and we are scheduled to perform in a few places (details to come on our website). We are also working to build our action partner network to get folks more engaged. And, we will have an online methodology so we may work with musicians around the world who want to compose new pieces that will reach broad audiences. We will be reaching out to select composers in the coming year.

We are also about to launch an exciting new project with Los Angeles-based composer and Grammy winner Heitor Pereira that will be geared toward kids and focused on biodiversity and climate change. That project will likely include some new animated elements and a longer campaign that will really engage kids! In fact, we plan to work on a strategy to bring our work to schools and take advantage of their curiosity and interest in action. Stay tuned.

And, of course, we are always looking for support for our work. We are a nonprofit organization trying to make a difference!

(Top image: The ClimateMusic Project at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco. Photo by Sven Eberlein.)

This article is part of the Climate Art Interviews series. It was originally published in Amy Brady’s “Burning Worlds” newsletter. Subscribe to get Amy’s newsletter delivered straight to your inbox.

___________________________

Amy Brady is the Deputy Publisher of Guernica magazine and Senior Editor of the Chicago Review of Books. Her writing about art, culture, and climate has appeared in the Village Voice, the Los Angeles TimesPacific Standard, the New Republic, and other places. She is also the editor of the monthly newsletter “Burning Worlds,” which explores how artists and writers are thinking about climate change. She holds a PHD in English and is the recipient of a CLIR/Mellon Library of Congress Fellowship. Read more of her work at AmyBradyWrites.com at and follow her on Twitter at @ingredient_x.

———-

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Powered by WPeMatico

Green Tease Reflections: Climate Justice in Arts and Culture

25th February 2020: For this ‘micro-Green Tease’ we gathered together representatives from Scottish arts organisations to get their thoughts on Climate Justice: what it is, why it matters, what the cultural sector can do to embody and promote it. The discussion is summarised below but work on this is still ongoing so do please get in touch if you have thoughts of your own.

Introduction

Lewis kicked off the discussion by throwing out some examples of campaigns that appear to engage with issues of climate justice:

  • Save Our Straws: a disability rights campaign aimed at getting Starbucks to reverse their ban on plastic straws. The ban was instituted on the grounds that it would reduce disposable plastic waste but campaigners argued that people with certain disabilities need those straws and that an outright ban on them would be discriminatory.
  • Black Lives Matter protested against the expansion of London City Airport on the grounds that it would lead to more climate change causing emissions and that people of colour are on average more adversely affected by climate change impacts. They also drew connections to increased local air pollution in the area, which has a high proportion of people of colour, well above the UK average. Their slogan was, ‘Climate Crisis is a Racist Crisis’
  • The Pacific Climate Warriors: a grass roots anti-climate change campaign based across multiple Pacific island nations, drawing attention to their situation as among the first to suffer the effects of rising sea levels, while seeking to brand themselves as being at the forefront of climate action rather than as passive victims.
  • Protests at the British Museum drew connections between its sponsorship by fossil fuel company BP and the museum collections containing objects taken from cultures around the world, many during Britain’s colonial past. The campaigners argued that by helping ‘artwash’ BP’s image they were promoting a form of climate colonialism by legitimising its activities that would lead to climate change, the effects of which are most strongly felt in Britain’s ex-colonies.

He also drew attention to the long history of climate justice and how long it has taken for us to engage with it. He showed images of the 2002 Bali Principles of Climate Justice adopted at the Earth Summit in Bali, which were in turn based on the 1991 Principles of Environmental Justice, drafted at the First National People of Culture Environmental Summit, Washington DC.

Defining Climate Justice

In pairs we then attempted to define the term climate justice and consider where we are most likely to encounter issues of climate justice living in Scotland and working in arts organisations.

Our definitions of Climate Justice shared an emphasis on disproportionate impacts of climate change falling on already disadvantaged people, exacerbating existing inequalities. We also raised the importance of taking responsibility for the large contributions the UK has made to global emissions and sharing the burdens (and potential opportunities) of climate change. It was widely agreed important to put the emphasis on the collective rather than the individual and to develop a reasonably objective framework.

Some other useful definitions and examples are also available on the GCU Centre for Climate Justice website.

Discussions of particularly Scottish climate justice issues repeatedly raised:

  • Migration and climate refugees
  • Urban-rural divides and remote communities
  • A ‘just transition‘ away from the oil industry
  • Understanding the global impact of local work. Seeing everything through ‘globe tinted spectacles’, as one participant put it.

Discussions of relevance to arts and culture organisations raised:

  • What we produce: can we provide a ‘voice for the voiceless’, build awareness, challenge ideas, offer a space for discourse, contribute to a paradigm shift?
  • How we run ourselves: can we practise what we preach in the way we run our organisations, collaborate with social justice organisations? How can we deal with the connection between arts and culture and privilege?
Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion

Following this, Helen Trew of Creative Scotland contributed by drawing some useful connections between climate justice and existing Equalities, Diversity and Inclusion policy. She pointed out that, like climate justice, EDI is not just relevant to arts organisations and thus forces us to consider our position as part of a wider purpose. She discussed how, like climate change, the protected characteristics involved in EDI apply to all of us, but not to the same extent: ‘Treating everyone the same does not result in equality’. Similarly, although climate change will affect all of us, it will affect everyone in different ways and to different extents, which climate justice recognises. She also suggested that climate justice and EDI share the issue that, while it’s easy to see the value from a broad perspective, it can be more difficult to see what you can or should do within your own immediate context, which takes detailed examination and thought.

What can we do?

In the final discussion section, we started trying to think about how we as arts organisations can:

  • Embody climate justice by running ourselves in a climate just manner
  • Promote climate justice through our programming and how we engage with audiences

Suggestions from the discussion included:

  • Both programming and staffing should be diverse and representative.
  • Fully engaging with climate justice requires getting buy in from directors, managers, and board members.
  • Climate justice provides opportunities for positive framing, showing how responding to climate change is also an opportunity to make our society more just.
  • Climate action should be promoted as something that everyone can get involved in.
  • Embedding artists and arts organisations more deeply in local communities would reduce travel emissions and enable more active engagement with local social justice issues.
  • Advocating for changes in how the cultural sector works should form part of work in climate justice.

The next steps will involve refining this broad discussion into more specific advice on how climate justice can form a part of how arts organisations run. If you have any thoughts that you would like to contribute, please get in touch with lewis.coenen-rowe@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Representatives were present at this event from:

  • Beyond Borders Festival
  • Birds of Paradise
  • Creative Carbon Scotland
  • Creative Scotland
  • Film Access Scotland
  • Glasgow Women’s Library
  • Just Festival
  • Lung Ha Theatre Company
  • Nevis Ensemble
  • North Edinburgh Arts
  • Starcatchers Theatre

Image: Canva

The post Green Tease Reflections: Climate Justice in Arts and Culture appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates

#GreenArts day is the annual online celebration of green arts and culture across Scotland. Each year we spend the day promoting the achievements of Green Arts Initiative members, release the annual report and make available new case studies on work being done by members of the initiative. 

Green arts day is now over for this year, but scroll down to get some highlights of what happened during the day.

#GreenArts Day

Head to our TwitterFacebook, or Instagram to see what’s going on and join the discussion by posting with the hashtag #GreenArts and tagging us. Have you done anything in the past year that you’re particularly proud of? What is the role of arts and culture in creating a more sustainable Scotland?

Stay tuned for live updates on the day here.

Act 1: The Green Arts Initiative

We released our annual report and celebrated the fantastic work being done by the over 200 members of the Green Arts Initiative. Find out more.

#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 2
#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 3

Act 2: Scotland’s Environmental Organisations

We celebrated connections with green, sustainability, and environmental organisations across Scotland and beyond. Read about our partnership with Good Energy or visit the Library of Creative Sustainability.

Act 3: Climate Justice

We believe that tackling the climate emergency is a matter of justice, with the responsibility for and repercussions of climate change being extremely unequally distributed . We believe that arts and culture can play an important tole in embodying and promoting climate justice. Read about a recent Climate Justice Discussion we hosted, or read more about climate justice.

Intermission

Have a read of our six new case studies on work being done by Green Arts Initiative members, released today.

Act 4: Adaptation Hour

It’s not just about taking action to limit climate change. We know that things are already changing and not everything can be stopped, so we also need to start adapting. Visit the Cultural Adaptations Website for loads more advice on this.

Act 5: Looking Ahead

Green Arts Initiative members are full of plans for the future, most importantly thinking about how we can take advantage of the COP26 climate talks coming to Glasgow in November 2020. Read a summary of a discussion event we hosted about this.


Green Arts Initiative Annual Report 2019

Have a read of the newly released annual report.

It gives information about Green Arts Initiative members as well as a thorough survey of what work has taken place over the last year and what members of the initiative are planning for the coming year. Learn what members think are the biggest issues to tackle and how to overcome these challenges. Get information about the make up of the initiative and where members are based. Get inspiration from specific examples and get a sense of overall trends.

Thanks to Boon Studio for this beautiful design work.

#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates
#GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates 1
Case Studies

Read case studies from members of the Green Arts Initiative giving detailed information on work they have undertaken in the last year.

Highland One World offer insights from their work with local youth groups on creative ways of building understanding of climate refugees.

Fife Contemporary report on their Climate Emergency Day for artists to discuss how to green their work and offer feedback to the Scottish Government.

NEAT Shows discuss their paternship in a plastic-themed community film screening and raffle.

Olive Pearson relates how she embedded zero waste principles into her craft.

Ecologisers lead us through their creative ‘Eco-Santa’ anti-littering campaign for children.

Nevis Ensemble detail their approach to green touring and how they get the whole team engaged in sustainable practice.

The post #GreenArts Day 2020: Live Updates appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Newton Harrison: 3 recent videos including ‘Apologia Mediterranean’

By Chrisfremantle

Three recent video works by Newton Harrison – an apology to the Mediterranean Sea, a call to Scotland to become the first industrialised country to give back more than it takes out, and an installation to assist biodiversity to adapt in Northern California.

Meditation on the Mediterranean. Included in the Collateral events of the 58th Venice Biennale, as part of Artists Need to Create on the Same Scale that Society Has the Capacity to DestroyMare Nostrum at the Complesso della Chiesa di Santa Maria delle Penitenti, Fondamenta di Cannaregio, 910, from 8 May – 24 November 2019.

On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland included in the Taipei Biennial 2018-19 and exhibited in Banchory, Braemar and Edinburgh. Created with the support of The Barn, Banchory and the SEFARI Gateway.

Future Garden for the Central Coast of California is a site-specific environmental art installation by UCSC emeritus arts research professors Newton Harrison and his late wife Helen Mayer Harrison–at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanic Garden.

Working in tandem with botanists at the Arboretum, the Harrisons have created trial gardens inside three refabricated geodesic domes, where native plant species are being exposed to the temperatures and water conditions that have been projected for the region in the near future.

For more on current work see The Center for the Study of the Force Majeure. For historical work see The Harrison Studio. For perspectives on the practice of the Harrisons see various Fremantle and Douglas papers.

———————

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Powered by WPeMatico