Yearly Archives: 2018

News: UK Festivals Get Smart with Power and Travel

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

A major shift in the way UK festivals approached energy management and travel planning in 2017 has been revealed in the annual Festival & Events Industry Green Survey.

The Event Industry Green Survey 2017, run by festival think-tank Powerful Thinking, revealed the percentage of UK festivals actively working with their power suppliers, to increase efficiency and reduce fuel, doubled from one in four to half of events between 2016 and 2017. It also shows that the percentage of festivals promoting sustainable travel to their audiences has significantly risen; from 28% of events in 2016 to 80% in 2017.

Further positive shifts in power management for the 50 participating UK festivals were: 58% started monitoring generator loads in 2017, 20% said they are using sustainably sourced HVO fuel and 20% are now using hybrid technology to help cut fossil fuel use, costs and associated emissions.

This is the third year that a major shift in power use at festivals has been reported by the survey, demonstrating a wider shift in practices and technologies being employed.

However, the survey results also showed that only around 1 in 3 festivals are receiving a detailed post-event power consumption report. Understanding how power was used retrospectively has proved to be a key tool in planning efficient energy systems for future events, so this is an area that event organisers can prioritise in coming years. Festivals also reported that the most common barrier in using renewable energy at events was finding a supplier of hybrid and solar generators.

Andy Lenthall, General Manager of the Production Services Association (PSA) suggests that festivals are increasingly overcoming these barriers by, “finding a power supplier who can supply a detailed post-event report and who are willing to put in the extra mile to manage energy more efficiently and/or source alternative energy equipment.”

The results show that inability to find a power supplier to meet their needs is the most common frustration for organisers aiming to change their practices. Event organisers looking for power suppliers who can help them meet their sustainability goals can use the Powerful Thinking Sustainable Power Supplier List.

On the subject of travel, a shift was seen in the way festivals are working to increase sustainable travel to events. The percentage of festivals promoting sustainable travel to their audiences has risen from 28% of events in 2016 to 80% in 2017. With audience travel accounting for up to 80% of the average UK music festival’s CO2 footprint this is a great place to start in tackling environmental impacts. In 2017, 25% of participating festivals offered travel carbon-balancing for their audiences to address travel emissions through the charity Energy Revolution. Organisers can learn more about this initiative and find advice on how to increase sustainable travel in the Energy Revolution Guide To Sustainable Travel.



The post News: UK Festivals Get Smart with Power and Travel appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

The Artist Deep in The Heart of Environmental Awareness

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Environmental advocate Edward Abbey stated that “It is no longer sufficient to describe the world of nature. The point is to defend it.” In recent years, we have witnessed increased devastation brought on by natural disasters whose causes can be traced back to man-made damage to the environment. Most of us cannot fathom the extent of the irreversible damages that pollutants have had on our ecosystem thus far, but these gaps in our knowledge and awareness can hurt us the most. Each link in the ecosystem is indispensable. All of us with a platform and an audience must make sure that we compel those around us to not only pay attention, but also, to act.

As an artist, I like to think of my paintbrush, my camera, as well as every other medium I use, as my personal weapon in the fight to preserve the environment. I’m most interested and heavily invested in marine life. Call it a crusade, if you will, but I believe that my art, and in particular my most recent works, reflect my deep-rooted love and respect for nature in all of its manifestations. Likewise, the fear that I have for our fragile ecosystem and how much harm we’re doing to it is apparent in every brush stroke, and in every ray of light and shade in my work.

Conus, Mixed media on canvas, 32x 59″

Case in point are my abstract oceanographic paintings. I strive to transform the visual elements of the molluscan shell into pure-energy; a mixed media panorama rife with struggles and drama which is the very essence of oceanic life. The hard, yet frail structures of the shell with its alluring colors and complex patterns turn into larger-than-life abstract explorations of my darkest and most intimate environmental anxieties. In my art, my love for sea life meets with an almost maternal instinct to protect it against all our human transgressions – environmental pollutants, overfishing, and climate change. This is expressed in subtle color choices and dramatic undercurrents of rising and falling swashes of bright hues with conflicting and almost aggressive and threatening darker tones lurking at the edge – always ready to disrupt the harmony and fluid sea and instill chaos where a balanced ecosystem reigns.

Because art is more than a message – it’s a mission – my paintings, photographs and mixed media pieces navigate the full wheel of the color spectrum to regenerate the path of floating forms as well as to rejuvenate the schema of the abstract seascapes. Woven together, naturalism and imagination, propelled by a rich color palette, help me illuminate the subtle wonders of marine life. What really attracts me to mollusks is the fact that they’re often overlooked. For the most part, they’re stationary and don’t offer the dramatic flippancy of, say, an octopus. Yet their static configurations hide vibrant ripples of a rich and active life that seem to portray the seascape with utmost truthfulness. All the shapes in my work, no matter how abstract, mask the explosive dynamism of a complex life lived by my molluscan models – a dynamism that can only unfold itself to the patient observer and marine lover.

Conus III, Mixed media on canvas, 42x 59″

As far back as I remember, I’ve been obsessed with both creativity and environmental activism. From offshore oil drilling to the alarming signs of environmental changes, I’ve always considered it my life’s mission to combine my art with my passion for conservation to raise awareness of the dangers our oceans are facing. Marine life is disappearing right in front of our eyes; the need to step up our efforts to stop the devastation has never been greater. Hence my emphasis on the architectural detail of the shells. At its core, my work provides a different lens to look at our world and energize our perspective. If viewers can appreciate the turbulent and diverse life that is only a few feet below the surface of the water, then my childhood dreams are finally a reality.

Those dreams have always led me into the water where molluscan life rolls with ocean undercurrents. The hours I spent observing those exquisite life forms were later transformed, with the help of an extra dose of imagination, into large-scale manifestations not unlike amphibian patterns. The vivid colors only reflect the captivating exhilaration I get as I immerse myself in this lavish beauty while struggling with my fear for its safety.

Conus V, Mixed media on canvas, 58 x 40″

You can call me a conservationist, an activist, or a preservationist; my main concern is to revitalize people’s memory of aquatic riches that might not be there for our children. Perhaps my art depicts my personal journey as I come to terms with the dangers that threaten the very existence of the marine universe. But whether it conforms to predefined categories or stands out unique in style and message is not as important to me as preserving an ecosystem that for too long has been on the receiving end of reckless human policies and actions.

(Top image: Argus II, Mixed media on canvas, 44x 58″)

______________________________

Judith Gale lives and works in New York City. She is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts and is one of the founding members of The Molluscan Science Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of our coral reefs. She works with many media, including painting, mixed media, and photography. In addition, Judith works in the New York City public school program as an art specialist. She aspires to frame the natural wonders of the environment in a way that allows viewers of her art to connect with the environment as authentically as possible; she aims to magnify nature’s beauties through the lens of various media.


 

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Report on AALERT

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

This is a quick and personal reflection on the Art and Artists in Landscape and Environmental Research Today workshop (AALERT) held at the National Gallery London 15 Feb jointly sponsored by the Landscape Research Group and the Valuing Nature Programme of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and supported by the Landscape & Arts Network. This is not an overview of the content of the day, including excellent presentations by Prof Stephen Daniels, Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway or the many threads and contributions. The intention is to focus on the key points in relation to the stated aim – understanding the contribution artists and art make to landscape and environmental research. We understand a more detailed summary will be published by the organisers.

The day brought together artists with natural and social scientists, and humanities academics. The key question was and remains what contribution art and artists can make to landscape and environmental research. The day was organized around questions of agency, value and how to embed artists with other disciplines. The fundamental problem is that many people don’t understand artists’ research. That being said, everyone ‘knows’ that there is a contribution. Most people don’t agree with Lewis Wolpert when he said,

“Although science has had a strong influence on certain artists – in the efforts to imitate nature and thus to develop perspective or in the area of new technologies – art has contributed virtually nothing to science.” (Wolpert, 2002)

Tim Collins opened proceedings with a quote highlighting that artists want to be dealt with as researchers rather than as subjects of research

“In the first place, the scene of research, centred on academic and scientific communities, will encounter new actors who will have to be considered no longer as objects of study, but as inquiring subjects themselves: the artist and the artist-as-researcher…. This means that, fourthly, research cultures will potentially be enriched with new narratives, discourses and modes of knowledge including knowledge of making (techne) and knowledge of the value systems that inform making (phronesis).” (Coessens et al., 2009, pp91-92)

This point is important because art and artists are often spoken for and about not least by art historians but also by anthropologists and other social scientists. We might argue that these interlocutors use evidence in forms which are ‘inter-operable’ with other forms of research evidence. The manifestation of artists’ research is at its core about making room to re-experience the world as (slightly) different, to pick up on Clive Cazeaux’s articulation. This ‘seeing it differently’ – and here we mean seeing in the widest sense, as in ‘understanding the possibility that it isn’t as we assume’ – is maybe neither quantitative nor qualitative. The concepts we use to understand the world shape both how and what we perceive. And also form how we make the world. This critical insight is valuable.

To be clear there are at least two meanings of research when used by artists (and even artists in the room conflated these). Pretty much all contemporary artists do research in the process of making work. In particular artists doing work with other disciplines, in public places, etc and in particular in landscape and environment, do a lot of research across a whole range of dimensions – social, historical, geographical, geological, ecological, etc – as preparation for making work. Sometimes this involves discovering new or forgotten things and sometimes it is functionally ‘familiarisation’ and assemblage of knowledge about a place or issue. Some artists do research informed by the same criteria as other academics – making a contribution to knowledge characterised by ‘originality, significance and rigour’. Artists don’t have to be in academic positions in research active institutions to do this, and in fact there is a long history of artists shaping our understanding of the world and sharing methods and processes so that others can learn. One difference, in addition to going beyond the specific project needs, is that the latter has a public dimension to the process and product which enables others to learn from it. Another difference is the positioning of the work with a social historical discourse. This in turn is one of the validations of the originality, significance and rigour requirement (which has been standardised over 26 years of UK research assessment).

The lack of awareness of this and its manifestation in artist-led work receiving 4* ratings in the 2014 REF was a cause of some frustration during the day.

Fundamentally each discipline and practice has a different way of knowing the world which are all equally valid. The challenge is that the ‘wicked’ problems we are facing including climate disruption, biodiversity loss and a warming planet require us to work together across traditional boundaries in teams. And teams need to understand each other. A quick rehearsal of Basarab Nicolescu’s formulation is useful (Nicolescu, 1997). He starts from the point that disciplines are valuable in themselves. He then talks about multi-disciplinary in terms of co-ordination of different disciplines’ methods; interdisciplinary in terms of learning from each other and hybridising; and trans-disciplinary as working across different levels of reality particularly where they are incommensurable e.g. between the scientific and the spiritual or data and emotions. He suggests that artists are particularly good at this.

Collins cited John Roberts, offering an articulation of this particular quality and its complexities. Roberts argues that art has a complex relationship with society at once enmeshed and autonomous. In particular he argues that, “one of the still operative functions of the artist – exploited extensively at the moment, as it is – is his or her ability to work with, reflect on, move through various non-artistic disciplines and practices without fully investing in them.” (Roberts, 2016, p112). Roberts calls this ‘adisciplinarity’ and he says,

“[t]his is because it is not the job of art to defend or extend the truth claims of a particular discipline, but to reflect on the discipline’s epistemological claims and symbolic status within the totality of non-art/ art disciplines and their social relations. When art draws, for example, from a particular scientific discipline such as physics, this is not in order to defend the truths of a particular branch of physics, but, rather, to use such truths as a reflection on physics as such, or as a means to reflect on the truth claims of other disciplines and practices.” (Roberts, p114)

This clarifies another aspect of discussion which focused on agency and autonomy. For artists to do what they do in terms of Roberts’ description, in terms of ‘seeing and/or making it differently’ they need a degree of autonomy, yet at the same time to work with others. This distinctive position, often within a team, is challenging and needs to be valued by others (including other academics but also funders and policy-makers), supported and given space. It raises anxiety in a risk averse culture. But it is fundamental to the contribution that art and artists can make, even if it is an idea that many struggle to recognise or understand how to ‘operationalise’.

One aspect which relates to this is that as artists (and curators, producers, writers) we have become very good at learning the languages of other disciplines and practices, their forms of evidence and their policy frameworks. The converse of this is that we don’t seem to have been very effective at articulating our forms of knowledge to other researchers and practitioners (this problem is as true in the context of arts and health as it is in research-led work).

Another related complexity flushed out during the day was that the conditions of participation need to be attended to, and the Artist Placement Group was referenced, including John Latham’s conceptualisation of the ‘Incidental Person’ as well as his and Barbara Steveni’s operating principles of Open Brief leading to Feasibility Study, the need for a willing host, and the need for commensurate pay (Steveni, 2003). This methodology has been developed within the arts to structure conditions for work in non-arts contexts.

This rich and provocative event opened up real questions on the contribution, conceptual and practical, of artists to landscape and environmental research. It opened up issues which need deeper reflection and consideration because without question the ‘wicked problems’ are increasingly the focus of research and policy. Whilst the Valuing Nature Programme may be nearing the conclusion of this phase of work it is highly likely that the next cycle of research will be larger with more challenging issues to address and it would be good to see more artists as Principal Investigators, Co-Investigators and Research Fellows helping to shape these projects, not just communicate the findings.

As the noted anthropologist Tim Ingold said recently,

“But while mainstream science continues to think of art as a medium for the communication of its own findings, it is now art, rather than science, that is leading the way in promoting radical ecological awareness.” (Ingold, 2017)

Ingold is echoing Roberts’ construction of arts adisciplinary role, pointing to the ways in which artists are re-imagining, even re-creating, our relationships with ecologies whether that is in the form of greater awareness and sensitivity or activism (and a range of other possibilities). All of these practices draw on the truths of various ecological sciences but also ask whether those truths are sufficient to articulate the value of the ecologies they claim to explain. The activists also use art to engage with the symbolic status of both the art and non-art social constructions (e.g. the social license to operate provided to the fossil fuel industry through sponsorship of cultural institutions). But that’s another subject.


Coessens, K., Douglas, A. and Crispin, D. 2009. The Artistic Turn: A Manifesto. Leuven University Press.

Ingold, T. 2017. The Art of Paying Attention. Aalto University. http://artofresearch2017.aalto.fi/keynotes.html accessed 16 February 2018

Nicolescu, B. 1997. The transdisciplinary evolution of learning. In Proceedings of the International Congress on What University for Tomorrow? Towards a Transdisciplinary Evolution of the University, Locarno, 30 April-2 May.
http://www.learndev.org/dl/nicolescu_f.pdf

Roberts, J., 2016. Revolutionary Time and the Avant-Garde. Verso

Steveni, B. 2003. Repositioning Art in the Decision-Making Processes of Society. In Interrupt Symposia. https://web.archive.org/ accessed 19 February 2018

Wolpert, L. 2002. Which Side Are You On? The Observer. 10 March. https://www.theguardian.com/education/2002/mar/10/arts.highereducationaccessed 16 February 2018



 

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Blog: Embedding Artists in Sustainability Contexts

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Carbon Scotland’s work placement Elly White shares what she’s been up to so far on her six-week placement, contributing to our culture/SHIFT project and our plans for a sharing event in early March run with North Edinburgh Arts.

My name is Elly White and since the end of January I have been undertaking a work placement at Creative Carbon Scotland.  I’m currently a fourth year student at the University of Edinburgh, studying History of Art and Photography for a degree in Fine Art.

The main focus of my placement is researching for the culture/SHIFT project, which explores how cultural and creative perspectives can contribute towards greater sustainability. I have spent my first few weeks researching a wide range of examples, such as Jenny Kendler at the Natural Resources Defence Council in the USA. She worked alongside their staff for a significant period of time (2013-2016) and was given access to resources, which embedded her fully within the organisation. Kendler created artistic projects that called for participation as the NRDC wished to engage more with the public to communicate environmental issues and her work helped create a greater dialogue.

My investigations have expanded to different sectors such as science and public health; how these too can function to serve as models in the culture/SHIFT context. The objective is to compile a variety of case studies to contribute to the creation of a Library of Practice. This will aid in the facilitation of new initiatives, highlighting the benefits of re-imaging culture and the possibilities of giving artists the scope to share their knowledge within organisations to address environmental issues.

Finally, I co-hosting an event at the end of my placement with other students on the course who are currently on placement at North Edinburgh Arts. This was be a great platform to reflect on my time at Creative Carbon Scotland and for the discussion to take place within the context of a cultural community organisation embedded in the area of North Edinburgh.


culture/SHIFT – Adapting to and mitigating the impacts of the climate we have created requires collaborative, interdisciplinary thinking as well as creative solutions. Our culture/SHIFT programme supports cultural and sustainability practitioners to explore new ways of working together to address complex problems and bring about transformational change. Find out more about the programm here. 

Please feel free to get in touch if you have examples that may be of relevance towards the development of the Library of Practice, contact me via email at elly.white@creativecarbonscotland.com. After March please direct emails to culture/SHIFT Creative Carbon Scotland Producer, Gemma Lawrence, at gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Image: Advertisement for Glenrothes Town Artist. Newspaper Image © ‘The Birmingham Post’, Monday 6 May 1968. Image reproduced with kind permission of The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).



The post Blog: Embedding Artists in Sustainability Contexts appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: Ice-Themed Writing, Art & Music

Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents is seeking the following addressing the theme of “Ice Culture”:

  • Nonfiction — Not to exceed 2,000 words
  • Poetry — Not to exceed three poems
  • Fiction — Not to exceed 2,000 words
  • Visual Art — Up to 3 works
  • Photography — Up to 3 works
  • Music — Up to 3 songs

Artists, writers, scientists, travelers, and musicians are invited to submit work that explores ice-related themes. We are seeking work that features the physical and spiritual beauty of our world’s ice, explores the life of the people and cultures that are connected to the ice from the Arctic Circle to Antarctica, and addresses important political issues related to ice.

Submit Now!

For literature, please submit only works in English. For other work (visual art or music), please submit an English translation.

Artists with selected work will be provided with a $50 (U.S.) honorarium. All payments will be made by PayPal. Recipient must be able to receive payments via PayPal.
Accepted works will be published online and in a print version of the publication. Artists will be asked to grant permission for publication with Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents (both online and in print), and will thereafter retain copyright of their work.

 

Submission deadline: May 31, 2018.

Submit Now!

Presentation: On The Deep Wealth Of This Nation

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Launch and Live screening: ​Friday 9 March, 7pm
Live streamed from California: Newton Harrison of the Harrison Studioand The Center for the Study of the Force Majeure (CFM) sets out a vision for Scotland and for the River Dee.

Following on from his lecture in the early autumn, The Barn is delighted to host the launch of the Center for the Study of the Force Majeure’s vision for Scotland and the Dee valley in the form of a guiding narrative film exploring the implications of climate change and provoking thought and action for how we might adapt to the challenges as a diverse group of communities of interest.

This vision imagines the wealth of nations in terms of water, topsoil, forests, air, posing the question of how we as a global community might reach a plan of action that is commonly shared and that secures the health of our natural systems.

This work, entitled The Deep Wealth of this Nation, has been developed by Newton Harrison. Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison are internationally acclaimed artists and pioneers in the ecological art movement. Across five decades they have been invited as artists by governments and national and regional leaders, across the world, including the Dalai Lama, to address issues of climate change in specific places and communities. Their work as artists is consistently informed by current scientific research.

A key contributor to the vision is the James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, an interdisciplinary scientific research institute specializing in crops, soils, land use and environmental research. The collaboration is supported by Scottish Environment, Food and Agricultural Research Institute Gateway (SEFARI) to ensure that the effective communication of research outputs and outcomes to individuals and organisations involved in the future of the environment.

The Barn, Banchory is known nationally as Scotland ’s largest rural multi arts centre. Over the past two decades it has developed a special interest in art and ecology. It currently supports the largest recent allotment development in Scotland, a wild garden and a walled garden building biodiversity along with sound practices of food production and consumption. Buchanan’s, the cafe at the Barn is a key part of the local Slow Food Movement. The Barn has recently secured revenue funding from Creative Scotland and forms a key part of Creative Scotland’s and Aberdeenshire’s arts network.

The screening of this video and continuing conversations will inform the development of a public exhibition and related events in September 2018.

Supported by SEFARI


9 March 2018
Networking and bar from 7pm
Live stream from 7.30pm

This event is FREE but tickets are limited. BOOK NOW

Can’t make it to the event in person?

If you are unable to make the Barn screening in person but who would like to join the event via webinar please email programming@thebarnarts.co.uk with your contact details.

The Barn leaflet of events (pdf) The Deep Wealth Feb2018


ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.</ br></ br>

Go to EcoArtScotland

Open Call: Artists and Researchers GYAC 2018, Tokyo

The 2018 GAMMA Young Artists Competition seeks artists’ and researchers’ work for submission and participation in the GYAC 2018 initiative in Tokyo. Submissions should follow the theme of Global Landscape of Sustainable Art. Applicants should meet the following criteria:

• Demonstrates critical reflection on practices to create ecological, social, political and economic value.

• Suggests works through a new perspective of sustainability based on environment, economic and social issues.

• Suggests a sustainable artistic development project / analysis of case study / agenda for the future.

The competition will be held with artists who have been pursuing sustainable creative activities from around the world. The main theme of the competition is ‘Global Landscape of Sustainable Art’.

The concept of sustainability in arts and cultural fields is often difficult to find easy and quick answers. Instead, it is often constructed as abstract ideas. For these reasons, 2018 GAMMA YOUNG ARTIST COMPETITION will explore the sustainable creative environment with artists seeking environmental, ethical, and productive activities. The competition will include conversations between the finalists and international business scholars at ‘2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo’ in Tokyo.



Competition Schedule:

Submission Deadline: May 6th, 2018
Announcement of the 1st Screening: May 17th, 2018
Announcement of the 2nd Screening: May 24th, 2018
Final Screening and Award Ceremony at Tokyo, Japan, July 11th, 2018

Areas of Specialization:

Painting & Sculpture
Contemporary Media Art
Architecture & Design
Project Planning

Awards and Benefits:

1) The 1st screening (25 runners)
_ Included in the cyber gallery of the GAMMA homepage
_Included in the Exhibition Book by ACCESS which is an official magazine of ‘Center for Sustainable Culture and Service’ of Yonsei University (http://www.accesscs2.org/).
_Invited to a group exhibition in Seoul
_ Award certificate

2) The Final Screening (Final 5 runners)
_ One round trip ticket (economy class) and 3 nights’ stay in the conference hotel for ‘2018 Global Marketing Conference at Tokyo’ in Tokyo, Japan.
_ Included in the cyber gallery of the GAMMA homepage
_ Included in the Exhibition Book by ACCESS which is an official magazine of ‘Center for Sustainable Culture and Service’ of Yonsei University.
_ Invited to a group exhibition in Seoul
_ Award plaque

Submission Guidelines:

Submission Deadline: May 6th, 2018
Submissions accepted by email

You can submit up to 3 works:
1) Original size of the work: The original size of the submitted works should be bigger than 300mm by 300mm.
2) Please download and complete ‘2018 GAMMA Young Artist Competition Application Form’ from ‘How to Apply’ in the 2018 GYAC homepage (https://gamma2018.weebly.com/how-to-apply.html).
3) Images of Works
At maximum, 5 digital images per work should be included in your application form.
Each image should not exceed more than 3MB,
4) Labeling your application
Please include your name, country and area which you wish to apply in the name of your application file.
5) Working language: English only
6) Submitted items should not have been submitted to other art competitions.



For more information: please visit the application website.

For Questions, contact: art.juhyunkim@gmail.com