Yearly Archives: 2017

Opportunity: 2050 Climate Group Young Leaders Development Programme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The 2050 Climate Group are looking for bright, passionate young professionals and recent graduates (aged ~ 20-30) working in any sector/industry across Scotland to join this year’s 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme (YLDP).

As a 2050 Young Leader, you will:

  • Receive leadership training from Scotland’s foremost experts
  • Build knowledge of climate change issues and solutions facing Scotland’s people and private, public and third sectors
  • Improve your communication and influencing skills
  • Increase your confidence in your ability to tackle climate change
  • Build your CV with skills and experience
  • Be part of a growing network of passionate, diverse young people
  • Inspire others to actively contribute towards taking action now and shaping a sustainable future for all

To join the 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme you will need:

  • Passion and ambition
  • A desire to develop your leadership, communication and networking skills
  • Personal drive and energy
  • A willingness to attend at least 6 Saturday training and development sessions over the course of a year to enhance your knowledge and skills
  • The enthusiasm to use the knowledge and skills learnt to take action on climate change

How to apply:

The 2050 Climate Group are pleased to offer this leadership programme at no financial cost to participants, other than the costs associated with travel costs to each of the events.

If you’re interested in joining the programme, please visit their website for more information or fill in the application form.

Application Deadline: 20 March @ 17:00.  Please note that at the end of April, we will be holding an induction event for this year’s young leaders.

For more information on the 2050 Young Leaders Development Programme please do not hesitate to contact Sarah at recruitment@2050.scot

The post Opportunity: 2050 Climate Group Young Leaders Development Programme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Changing States of the World

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

By Guest Blogger François Quévillon

I have an interdisciplinary practice that combines installation, video, photography, sound, and digital technologies. My work explores world phenomena and perception through processes sensitive to their fluctuations and the interference of contextual elements. I examine the operational dimensions of images, sounds, and other media through the elaboration of systems with unstable parameters – compressed or endlessly evolving spatiotemporal structures. A mix of scientific observation and contemplation, my pieces create ambiguous experiences through which the ungraspable manifests itself. I investigate how technology affects or redefines human cognition, culture, and the environment, as well as our relationships to space, time, and one another.

My work generally uses interfaces that collect information from the environment. The variable conditions of the environment, human interference, and the activity of the components of the work can influence its evolution. Below are a few pieces that directly or indirectly engage with climate change.

Defrost (2001) 

Defrost is a video installation that explores the different states of matter by orchestrating its

transformation. At the center of the three screens is a slowly growing mass of ice around which several phenomena caused by thermal contrasts evolve in a manner that can suggest a geological timescale. Building momentum through environmental turbulence, the work evokes nature’s cycles as well as the disturbances associated with global warming.

Defrost led to other installations which integrate generative, transductive, and interactive processes, such as États et intervalles (States and intervals) in 2002 and Magnitudes in 2004. These works use computer vision to create experiences where the presence and movements of visitors affect images of icy landscapes, create the sound environment and, in the case of Magnitudes, modify its material configuration with haptic feedback. In these situations, human activity can be interpreted as a disruption to natural ecosystems while reminding us that their behavior is beyond human control.

Dérive (2010)

Dérive invites people to explore 3D models of geographical locations that transform according to live environmental data collected on the Internet. The public interacts with a digitized space whose appearance and recognizability is determined by information about ongoing meteorological and astronomical phenomena. In addition to being visualized, the data transmitted by remote environmental sensors is sonified. By connecting physical and digital spaces, Dérive questions the phenomenology of mixed realities and probes into the changing nature of our perception and representation of the world.

Because Dérive is in a state of perpetual change, reflecting weather conditions, daylight variations, and moon phases, it often leads to unexpected situations. The most surprising of those was during an exhibition at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History at the end of October 2012 when New York got hit by Hurricane Sandy. I wasn’t in the museum at that time but I could imagine how this severe weather phenomena was translated into a chaotic audiovisual scene. In the days that followed, I heard from people who shared touching testimonials about their experience of the piece, some of them being from New York or having relatives there during the storm. Experimenting with this open-ended work since 2010 raised my awareness of geoclimatic contexts, celestial movements, and how weather systems evolve and travel.

Waiting for Bárðarbunga (2015)

Started during a residency in Iceland in response to alerts about Bárðarbunga’s upcoming eruption and inspired by instruments used in volcanology, this generative video installation examines the monitoring and transformation of volcanic areas. While traveling around Vatnajökull, the glacier under which the Bárðarbunga stratovolcano is located, I shot videos of rivers under surveillance, drifting icebergs, foggy landscapes, hissing steam vents, boiling mud, and geothermal power plants. The piece consists of a database of hundreds of videos loops which are presented according to a probabilistic system influenced by data coming from the sensors of the computer that runs the installation. The work has an unpredictable unfolding and its conclusion remains unknown as the system’s monitoring and the course of events it presents influence each other.

Volcanic eruptions have had an important effect on the Earth’s climate throughout history, shaping the evolution of life and the planet itself. They are simultaneously creative and destructive events. The eruption of Laki in 1783 and Tambora in 1815 caused social, economic, and political turmoil worldwide. The environmental impact of Laki’s eruption is believed to have contributed to the French Revolution, and 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer. Volcanic eruptions remind us of the fragility of human societies facing climatic disturbances. In this piece, Bárðarbunga can be interpreted as a metaphor for the uncertainty inherent to the current global ecological, energy, and economic crisis. We apprehend and monitor a wide range of potentially catastrophic events that are or seem to be out of control, some of which have the power to trigger profound political change and transform society.

______________________________

François Quévillon is an artist from Montréal, Canada. He holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from UQAM and has been involved with several artist-run centres and research groups. His work, which is frequently developed during artist residencies, has been presented in exhibitions and at events dedicated to contemporary art, cinema, and digital creation. Among them: Sundance’s New Frontier exhibition (Park City), Spaces Under Scrutiny (New York), International Symposium on Electronic Art (Dubaï and Albuquerque), Festival Internacional de Linguagem Eletrônica (São Paulo), IndieBo (Bogotá), LOOP Barcelona, Plug-In at Contemporary Istanbul, Show Off Paris, Festival de la Imagen (Manizales), Mois Multi (Québec), Espace [IM] Média (Sherbrooke), FIMAV (Victoriaville), RIDM, Elektra, and International Digital Art Biennal (Montréal).


About Artists and Climate Change:

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Upcoming Events in the New York Sustainable Arts Community

Pictured Above: Global View of the Blued Trees Symphony 20′ x 30′ on view at KRICT, Daejeon, South Korea, until May 31st 2017.

Care as Culture:
Artists, Activists and Scientists Build Coalitions to Resist Climate Change
A Convening Around the Peace Table
February 12th, 2:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: Queens Museum
Mierle Laderman Ukeles’ Peace Table, serves as the site for convenings on peace, from
the personal to citywide to global. Ukeles and the Museum have conceived a series of
public programs meant to engage and contemporize some of Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Maintenance Art‘s important themes.Care as Culture is the final convening that brings the perspectives of eco-artists, activists, and experts on climate change together to interrogate and enrich culture’s place in the movements for environmental justice.

Reflecting What prevents us from working together and how can we advocate for change? Case study speakers include Newton HarrisonThe Natural History Museum,Natalie Jeremijenko, and Mary Mattingly.

Respondents include Carol BeckerFrancesco FiondellaAllan FreiHope Ginsburg, Alicia GrullonAmy LiptonLisa MarshallJennifer McGregorAviva RahmaniJason SmerdonStephanie Wakefield, and Marina Zurkow.

 

INFILTRATION ART
February 16, 8:30am to 10:00am
Location: Nassau Suite East/West, 2nd Floor
Chairs: Katharine J. Wright, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Gillian Pistell,
The Graduate Center, The City University of New York
General Idea’s Normal Art
Alex Kitnick, Bard College
Chris Burden’s Institutional Accomplices
Sydney Stutterheim, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York
Using Copyright Law to Reclaim the Spirit of Art as a Revolutionary Act in
The Blued Trees Symphony
Aviva Rahmani, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder
Regular Sessions; Sessions
SUBJECT AREAS
Art History-Contemporary Art
Art History-Public Art
Interdisciplinary-Museum Studies/Curatorial Studies/Art Criticism

Inclusion in
The Wasteland?
Opening February 9, 6pm – 8pm
Location: Central Booking, 21 Ludlow St., NYC, NY

Finally, check out the most recent Gulf to Gulf recording: “After the Tsunami.

Opportunity: CCS Digital Communications Officer (part time, 3 days/week)

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re excited to announce that we’re recruiting for a Digital Communications Officer to join the CCS team and contribute to the transition to a more sustainable Scotland by connecting culture and climate change.

Role summary

Digital communications play an increasingly important role in achieving Creative Carbon Scotland’s mission and objectives. The Digital Communications Officer will take a lead on managing current digital platforms and tools and developing new content and resources to ensure our outcomes are achieved across cultural and sustainability sectors, as well as managing the Communications Strategy with the CCS Producer. In the coming years, the Digital Communications Officer will also lead on the development of the CCS website (anticipated re-launch 2019).

Salary: £23,000 pro rata (0.6FTE) + up to 3% of salary in pension contributions matching employee’s contributions

Hours: Part time (0.6 FTE). A 22.5 hour week with a degree of flexibility on both sides, as some evening and weekend work may be required and busy periods may call for extra hours, with time taken off in lieu during quieter periods. Extra days’ work are likely to occur around specific project development and delivery.

Flexible working and Job Sharing: Creative Carbon Scotland welcomes proposals for flexible working or job-share, subject to the needs of the role being satisfactorily fulfilled.

Holidays: 12 days plus 6 public holidays (20 days/10 days pro rata) to be taken at times agreed with the producer

Contract and notice period: This is a fixed term contract until 31 March 2018. Continuation of the contract is anticipated subject to funding. A probationary period of 3 months will apply, following successful completion of which the full fixed term contract will be confirmed.

Place of work: Based at Waverley Court, East Market Street, Edinburgh, but home working and hot-desking may also be necessary. Travel throughout Scotland required.

Secondments: Creative Carbon Scotland is very willing to consider a secondment for this role where this will embed carbon reduction knowledge and work within the cultural sector.

Equal Opportunities: Creative Carbon Scotland is committed to actively promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in all of our work. This applies both to the services we provide to others and the way in which we ourselves operate. We are able to make reasonable adjustments to the Digital Communications Officer role to support equal opportunities in the recruitment process. If you have any enquiries regarding access requirements please contact gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com.

Main purpose of job:    

  • Development and delivery of CCS’s digital strategy;
  • Development and delivery of CCS’s communications strategy with CCS Producer;

Main Responsibilities:

Development and delivery of CCS’s digital strategy 

  • Ongoing maintenance of, and leading on the re-development of CCS website;
  • Creation of digital content including video, photographic, graphic and written content, digital resources, stakeholder reports, event documentation, and monthly newsletters;
  • Coordination of digital services including public webinars and video conferences;
  • Coordination and development of internal I.T. systems and procedures.

Development and delivery of CCS’s communications strategy 

CCS Strategy & Team support

  • Contribute to devising and delivering CCS’s overall strategic mission
  • Contribute to weekly team planning and evaluation meetings
  • Assist the wider team with project delivery as appropriate

The list of responsibilities is not exhaustive and the employee may be required to perform duties outside of this as operationally required and at the discretion of the Director.

Please note that during the phase of website re-development, the position hours will likely increase subject to agreement between the employee and employer.

How to apply

Please download and read carefully through the Digital Communications Office Job Description & Person Specification

Please apply for the post of Digital Communications Officer using our online application form.

Your application must include:

  • Your CV
  • Evidence of how you fit the person specification outlined in the Job Description & Person Specification via the online application form.
  • A maximum of three examples of your relevant work, either copies or links
  • Confirmation that you have completed the Equal Opportunities monitoring survey

Deadline: Midnight, Sunday 26th February

Interviews will be held on Thursday 9th March in Edinburgh

 

The post Opportunity: CCS Digital Communications Officer (part time, 3 days/week) appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.


Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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