Yearly Archives: 2017

Full Programme for Green Arts Conference!

With just two weeks to go until our conference for Scottish cultural organisations, we’re excited to announce the full programme for the day!

Take a look at our Green Arts Conference Programme

Share the Programme – and tell others you’re coming – using #GreenArts!

With speakers, sustainable suppliers and attendees from across Scotland, a mix of presentations, ‘show and tell’ sessions and workshops, it’s essential for any cultural Green Champion to attend.

  • We’ll be hearing from national funding body, Creative Scotland, on what is coming for the sector around sustainability, as well as hosting several sessions on carbon management soon to be required of all Regularly Funded Organisations.
  • We’ve expanded our popular ‘show and tell’ sessions to hear from more Green Champion peers in the sector, discussing a huge range of sustainability initiatives taking place across the country: from Ayr Gaiety to the Barn, Puppet Animation Scotland to the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo! These 15 minute talks will be sharing everything from how to reach international standards of success, to how to raise funds for sustainability projects.
  • Delving into the wider context of the work of Green Arts organisations, we’ll share the expertise of some of the most sustainable suppliers in the country, before hearing from the national organisation for responding to the impacts of climate change: Adaptation Scotland. 
  • New to this year’s conference, we’ll also be running a series of short, practical workshops on key skills for Green Champions: everything from how to build an internal group to expand your capacity, to using the tools to support your carbon management.
  • Finally, we’ll be topping off the day with a drinks reception for all attendees! You can also join us in attending the opening night of Sonica Festival’s ‘Shorelines‘ with a special discount code for Green Arts Conference-goers!

The Green Arts Initiative is supported year-round by carbon neutral print company, PR Print and Design, and the Green Arts Conference will also be showcasing some of the best sustainable suppliers in the country: Take One Mediathe Green Stationary CompanyResource Efficient Scotland and Vegware!

Click here to take a look at our full programme and timetable

The conference will take place on Wednesday 1st November 2017, at Partick Burgh Halls in Glasgow. For those still to get their ticket, there are still a few spaces! Book you place via EventBrite:


If you have any questions about the event, think you have something you could share with other attendees, or fancy a conversation on arts and sustainability more generally, get in touch!

The Green Arts Initiative is supported by carbon neutral print company, PR Print and Design. If you would like more information about our range of sponsorship opportunities, please contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com.



The post Full Programme Announced for Green Arts Conference! appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are pleased to announce a special offer for registered (and not-yet-registered) attendees for The Green Arts Conference. 

Cryptic, a member of the Green Arts Initiative, is offering a discount to attend the opening night of their climate-change-themed music/theatre production Shorelines, which follows directly from the conference drinks reception at 7.30pm on November 1st at Tramway in Glasgow.

About Shorelines

Shorelines is part of Sonica 2017, and has strong sustainability themes, exploring the impacts of a natural disaster, and mankind’s relationship with the natural world. As part of the Green Arts Conference this year, we’ll be exploring the artistic programming emerging along such themes (including hearing from artist Kathy Hinde, also part of Sonica 2017), and this is an opportunity for you to see some of it for yourself.

The Green Arts Conference

The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability is crafted specifically for those working on sustainability in organisations in the cultural sector, and those interested in the intersections between the arts and sustainability. This full-day conference will explore current best practice, and deliver practical, hands-on workshops on topics such as travel recording; staff green team engagement, and carbon management planning for arts organisations. Perfect for green champions in the arts, screen and creative industries, and for members of the Green Arts Initiative.

Delegates for the Green Arts Conference can get tickets for Shorelines on 1st November for £8 (instead of £15), contact us for details.

Find out more about Shorelines

Book your place at The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability

 



The post Sonica 2017 special offer for Conference attendees appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Craft Biennale Scotland 2018

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The inaugural Craft Biennale Scotland, to take place at the City Art Centre from May to July 2018, is now open for applications. With the theme Response to Place, this is an open international exhibition, that will be selected from applications by four curators from Scotland, Norway, Korea and Australia.

Craft Biennale Scotland is the idea of Tina Rose, founder and director of Really Interesting Objects CIC, an enterprise established to ‘bring together quality crafts practices with innovative approaches to engaging new audiences’.

Artistic Concept: ‘Response to Place’

Artists are invited to submit work that responds to a place where they live, remember or imagine, or that contributes to individual identity or nationality, and ways in which we create and express our ‘place’ in the world.

Responses may be overlapping and multi-faceted, and might for example, include visual or other sensory responses to their environment; local materials and indigenous craft practices; cultural and ceremonial traditions; experiences related to migration, political or social upheaval; local and social history; geography; archaeology or how particular forms have developed through interaction with materials or have been designed to perform a particular function.

To check the guidelines and timetable, and to register and complete the application form,please visit the website.

Deadline for Entries: Friday 1 December 2017, 5pm GMT

If you have any queries regards the submission process and guidelines, then please contact info@craftbiennalescotland.org

 



The post Opportunity: Open Call to Craft Makers – Craft Biennale Scotland 2018 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Culture Project Fund Open for Applications

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The second round of the Culture Project Fund in 2017/18 is a pilot partnership between the City of Edinburgh Council and Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo. It will allow grants of approximately £5,000 to be awarded to organisations creating new work in Edinburgh, thanks to a generous £50,000 charitable donation towards the Council’s Culture Fund Project from the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo.

The partnership extends the support available to artists in the city for locally produced performing arts projects, by helping to cover some of the costs artists face when developing new performing arts work.

The fund is open to any constituted organisation and applicants are encouraged to seek partnership support and apply for the exact funds needed. It is also open to organisations already in receipt of Council support. Applications close on Wednesday 8th November 2017 at 12 Noon and will be judged by a panel of industry specialists.

To request an application pack, please email:

culturaldevelopment@edinburgh.gov.uk.

 



The post Opportunity: Culture Project Fund Open for Applications appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Our Food. Our Future: Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland.

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland.

Slow Food Youth Network Scotland was started 2 years ago to encourage the development of a network of young people across Scotland who wanted to learn, debate, campaign, farm, cook, eat and dance their way to a more sustainable food future whilst exchanging ideas with young change-makers across the world.

By learning more about Scotland’s food system in a fun and social way, supporting local projects and building strong connections with the international Slow Food Youth Network – we have begun to bring people together to help create change within the global food system. In our third year, and Scotland’s Year of Young People, we want to build on our success by expanding the network and have lots of ideas to make this happen.

Join the first Slow Food Youth Network Scotland Committee!

In order to shape the future for SFYNScotland we are recruiting volunteers who can commit to join our first ‘committee’, become a local SFYN ambassador or occasional event volunteer – ideally spread across Scotland! For the coordinating committee we are looking for individuals who can commit to a minimum of 2 days per month. We’re particularly keen to hear from individuals with creative skills or expertise and/or with communications, web design, fundraising, marketing, research, illustration, campaigning, photography, events, or film-making skills (& we’re sure there’s things we haven’t thought of!)

There are also plenty of opportunities to join as an events volunteer or to become an ambassador in your local area as well! Join us at one of the volunteer sessions below to find out more or get in touch & tell us a little bit about yourself via sfynscotland@gmail.com.

Find out more:

Glasgow, Thursday October 19th, Project Cafe, Renfrew St, 10:30am – 12pm

Edinburgh, Thursday October 26th, OX 184, Cowgate, from 6pm

You can find out more about our ideas for the future in our latest newsletter. We are the world’s future leaders, entrepreneurs, farmers and consumers.

 



The post Opportunity: Our Food. Our Future: Get involved in shaping the future of Slow Food Youth Network in Scotland. appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: #NotFakeNews, Climate Change is Real

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

OPEN CALL: #NOTFAKENEWS: CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL

  • All artists invited.
  • Bidimensional works only: mixed media, painting, drawing, photography, and digital art on paper, canvas, panel, or other support.
  • Maximum size: 9″ x 12″ inches
  • 1 work per artist
  • No jury. No returns.
  • Mail to: Artists for Climate Change, P.O. Box 11614, Caparra Heights Station, San Juan, PR 00922.
  • We request original artworks that speak to the issue of climate change. Please do not send photojournalistic work documenting natural disasters.

EXHIBITION

All works will be exhibited indefinitely on the Artists for Climate Change website along with the artwork’s title, artist’s name, and website. We are planning a local exhibition in San Juan, Puerto Rico at a museum or cultural center and plan on taking the exhibition to other parts of the world to continue raising awareness of the dangers of climate change. A selection of the best artworks received will be part of the book project: #Notfakenews: Climate change is real

BOOK PUBLISHING & MAILING TO DONALD TRUMP

A selection of the best artworks received will be part of the book project: #Notfakenews: Climate Change is Real to be mailed to President Donald Trump.

Deadline: December 31, 2017

Visit the website: artistsforclimatechange.com for full details and to read about the story behind the project.

Photo: Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico 2017, Copyright Ricardo Arduengo-Get



The post Opportunity: Open Call – #NotFakeNews: Climate Change is Real appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Wild Science: Experiments in Nature and the Vanishing Amazon

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

I was in the Amazon jungle where, despite the heat and humidity, I was so excited I could barely contain myself. Insect repellent from a small bottle that had already saved me from Southeast Asian and Ugandan mosquitoes was the invisible shield that was preventing Amazonian ones from making a meal out of me. A dedicated umbrella-carrier, I had brought a bright yellow umbrella to the jungle, which amused the other artists in the expedition, but also gave them comfort when I shared my portable shade with them on the hot beaches of the Rio Negro, or when the rains poured incessantly in the Ducke Reserve.

In this ten-day residency, I would often be seen smelling things for my project. In An Olfactory Portrait of the Amazon Rainforest, I explore the scents of the Amazon, how these relate to people’s memories, and how the Amazon itself, like the ephemeral nature of smells, is vanishing because of destructive human practices. It was a joy to explore the Amazon through my nose.

One of the highlights of this experience was listening to talks by established scientists and artists, who helped us, resident artists, see the jungle through their different perspectives. It was illuminating to hear about research projects done in the Amazon, but disheartening to learn about the ways the jungle is being harmed through commercial exploitation. The Amazon struck me as a battlefield.

Hiking in the Amazon. Photo by Catherine Sarah Young.

Climate Change and Social Issues

For the past few years, I have focused on climate change and art through my series of interdisciplinary works in The Apocalypse Project. This has been a kind of jungle for me, but instead of poisonous insects and muddy trails, I wrestle with climate change deniers and people who do not believe that art has value. Over the years, I have felt that simply looking at the environmental consequences of climate change—extreme temperatures and weather events—wasn’t the whole story. Recently, issues of inequality, the ineffectiveness of science to affect policy, the lack of science education, our post-truth era, and the many things that divide humanity have haunted me and made me look anew at the role of science and art in society.

What is the good of science and art if we cannot relate to one another as human beings? This was my personal jungle to battle with: these networks of wicked problems that give me as an artist much to work with, but also makes me as a person very concerned about the future of mankind in general.

One day, I was in the woods with Gui, our intrepid photographer. Gui was taking photos of the distillation experiment that would help me extract smells out of some of the samples I had collected. As I stared at the scientific equipment that looked so out of place in the Amazon, something clicked in my head. Seeing science brought out of the ivory tower and into the wildness was haunting. This episode was more than just a residency documentation. It led to my next series of projects, “Experiments in Nature.”

Visiting an indigenous community. Photo by Catherine Sarah Young.

Experiments in Nature, Nature in Experiments

This series of investigations takes a critical look at the role of science in society. Science often has the reputation of being hidden in an ivory tower, and here I bring it out into the forest. Elements of nature are seen to be “helping” the experiment along, with the branches and logs supporting the equipment, temperatures helping to catalyze or stop the experiment, etc.

The questions I raise when I bring a controlled experiment in an uncontrolled natural environment are: Who is doing the experiment? Is it a successful or a futile experiment – I did manage to make the experiment work, but are the results even valid? Are these “performative” experiments in the same way that science, with its failure to affect policy, seems to sometimes be a performative discipline? Science almost becomes a theatrical space where people question the legitimacy of, for instance, climate data.

Jungle Experiments – Amazon (II), 2017. Still from video (1:39).

Science and the Public

After the residency, I was asked to give olfactory workshops at the Bosque da Ciência (Science Forest). It felt wonderful to share the value of our sense of smell and the wonder of experiments, and to further explore the themes I had worked with in the Amazon—nature, public participation, collaboration, etc.

As someone with both a science and an art background, I wish for these two disciplines to work together to change public perceptions on climate change (it’s real) and how we act on it (we can all do something). In the context of the Amazon, ongoing deforestation and resource extraction reduces the jungle’s ability to sequester carbon, and worsens the effects of climate change. Most of all, I want this project to reflect on the public’s seeming disenchantment with knowledge, and to call on all of us to rekindle our sense of wonder and intellectual curiosity. It was a humbling and awe-inspiring first visit to the Amazon, and with these new experiences and relationships, I’m looking forward to the next step.

Workshop at Bosque da da Ciência. Photo by Roumen Koynov, © LABVERDE.

Thank you to LABVERDE Artist Immersion Program in the Amazon for supporting the residency. Thank you to LABVERDE, INPA National Institute for Amazonian Research and Bosque da Ciência for supporting the workshop. Thank you to photographer Gui Gomes.

(Top image: The artist at work. Photo by Gui Gomes, © LABVERDE.)

______________________________

Catherine Sarah Young is an artist, designer, and writer originally from the Philippines whose work explores emerging technologies and alternative futures through interactive storytelling and sensory experiences. She creates works that investigate nature, our role in nature, and the tensions between nature and technology, exploring themes such as climate change and sustainability, science policy and citizen science, feminism and participatory art, among others. She has an international exhibition, residency, and fellowship profile and has collaborated with scientists, companies, chefs, artists, think tanks, and museums around the world. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


About Artists for Climate Change:

Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog