Yearly Archives: 2017

Greener Print Deal for Fringe Companies

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

 

We are delighted that PR Print and Design are supporting the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award and the Green Arts Initiative: continuing the success of this work, and offering their high quality, affordable and speedy Climate Neutral print and publications to the arts and cultural sector!

Creative Carbon Scotland first came into contact with PR Print and Design when we were sourcing a supplier for our own printing needs. We were impressed that their products have no environmental impact, as they generate almost all their required energy by their 192 onsite solar panels; they send zero waste to landfill; and they deliver the print by carbon-neutral courier!

They also calculate any remaining impacts of the print job, and offset this through a recognised carbon offsetting organisation that supports low-carbon technologies in the developing world – providing the customer with a certificate to keep which verifies and demonstrates your organisation’s commitment to the environment.

A Special Offer for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe

For Summer 2017 they’ll be offering a special deal for Edinburgh Festival Fringe shows and promoters. We know that print is currently one of the key ways to direct audiences to shows, but that striving to do it in a sustainable way, and on a budget (in the madness of the summer festivals) can be difficult.

They can create custom jobs of all shapes and sizes. but for a starter-for-ten, they can do:

  • 1000 A5 flyers for £75
  • 2000 A5 flyers for £119
  • 200 A3 posters for £69

They also tend to work on a 3-day turnaround, meaning they can deliver repeat orders (so you don’t overorder in one go) during the festival, or can top up new materials with fresh information (e.g. show review ratings) when you need it.

A Year-Round Arts Offer

However, if you’re not a Fringe company, there is still a way to benefit from this carbon-neutral opportunity. PR Print offer a huge range of print services (look out for a GAI report or Green Arts Conference programme, for example), and are set up to cater to the needs of the Scottish cultural sector, making:

  • Posters and printed materials of any size
  • Postcards
  • Programmes and other booklets
  • Business cards
  • Tickets
  • Exhibition stands and boards

They also have the benefit of being a local, Scottish business! Check out their MakeWorks video to get an idea:

Make Works visits PR Print & Design in Glasgow from Make Works on Vimeo.


PR Print and Design supports Creative Carbon Scotland’s Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, and our Green Arts Initiative, and has done since 2016. For more information, contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com or phil@prprint.net.

Image via MakeWorks



The post Greener Print Deal for Fringe Companies appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own `;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Open Call: Adaptation Scotland

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Community Engagement Pioneer Project

Support and funding of up to £10,000 is offered for one Community Engagement Pioneer Project to be developed and run as part of the Adaptation Scotland programme between September 2017 – March 2018.

This opportunity is open to all organisations and community groups based in Scotland. This includes public, private and third sector organisations and community groups based around particular locations and/ or interests.

Read more here including Case Studies.

Download the application form here – application deadline Friday 11 August 2017

 



About EcoArtScotland:



ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform. It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

Everything is (Dis)connected

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

“Art could help us to question our perceptions and relationships to the climate and its changes. Artistic explorations should not be restricted to illustrating our scientific discoveries, as is done in contemporary climate-change showcases. Art should instead help us to experience and reveal our inner participation with climate, the rupture of its balance and its meaning for our inner world, in the same way that landscape artists reframed the relationship of humans to their environment.”
—Julien Knebusch, The Perception of Climate Change (2007)

I have always loved the idea of using art to advance social causes, to make us reflect and rethink what it means to be human today. My artwork is an ongoing exploration of the unresolved environmental concerns of this century. It attempts to define the world we live in by contrasting aspects of a disintegrating planet with the beauty of all living things. Yet despite this overwhelming beauty, the reality is that we are on a precipice of extinction, balancing on the edge of a global meltdown. The ravages of climate change have already been experienced in the form of more frequent floods, violent storms, drought, and the destruction of wetlands and other natural habitats. All of this has contributed to the loss of tens of thousands of species of animals, birds, and bees. As human beings, we are dependent on Nature for our survival. Everything humans need to survive and thrive has been provided by our natural world: food, water, medicine, materials for shelter, etc. Supplies of coal, gas, water, steel, wood are seen as infinitely available. Technology and industry have distanced us from nature, but our reliance on the natural world is still as important as ever.

A Question of Balance.

How do we make climate change real? Many of us have difficulty recognizing the link between our environmental problems and the way we live. A large percentage of the world’s population doesn’t feel the effects of climate change, unlike the farmer who works the land, the fisherman who harvests the sea, people living in low-lying coastal areas, and inhabitants of drought-ridden developing countries. One of the consequences of urban lifestyles, industrialization, capitalism, nationalism, the global economy, and social divides is that we have lost our connection to the natural world. These deep divisions are preventing us from addressing the problem collectively. We must recognize that because of our carelessness and neglect of our planet, climate change has become the greatest threat to future generations. Those least responsible for the damage will have to carry the greatest burden. Is this really the legacy we want to leave?

What role can the artist play in this debate about the environment?

The informed artist is an observer. The artist can ask questions, help shape our understanding of the world, open up hearts and minds to new ways of thinking, and offer visual interpretations of various global issues. Through my own personal practice, I express my concerns by adopting a balance between realism and surrealism. When attempting to open up people’s perspective, it is important that art be presented in a language that is accessible. Ultimately, I hope I can communicate the idea that if we manifest a positive outlook, protect, nurture, and realize what we have, we  can make a difference. Change needs to be radical, both globally and politically. We need to consume less, destroy less, conserve more, and embrace the abundance of renewable energy resources. If we want to protect future generations, immediate action is required before it is too late.

The Erosion of Eden.

Everything is (Dis)connected and A Question of Balance are part of my “Split World” series. Water divides the images, creating two separate worlds; one above, one below, each with their own message to the viewer. I use water in many of my images, such as in Plastic!, to create scenarios that communicate the devastating effects of rising sea levels, pollution, melting ice caps, etc. The images are messages of beauty presented at the dawning of the apocalypse. They warn of what the future might hold. They question our failure to integrate with the natural world, our failure to realize that we are dependent on our planet to survive, our failure to take responsibility and acknowledge the consequences of our actions.

The Erosion of Eden and Coming Undone make use of the triptych format. Both images depict one scene: a landmass that provides a rich, unkempt, and decaying environment. Both of these eroded landmasses are strewn with “found” objects, some a testament to the throw-away society we live in, others gifts from nature. They serve as symbols of hope, negligence, reverence, destruction, ignorance, awe, and desolation. All reference mortality, impermanence, and the widespread and consequential harm that is being done to plants and animals that are trying to adapt to new conditions. The use of the triptych format differs in both images; The Erosion of Eden depicts one moment in time and Coming Undone portrays different instants, albeit the same location. The panels descend from a heavenly, idyllic scene to a world in ruins. It could be said from heaven to hell!

Coming Undone.

Artists throughout history have made significant contributions to social, political, and environmental challenges by using their creative practice to reflect upon and confront the issues at hand. If we are to alter, even reverse climate change, we need to reach out to people through their emotions to inspire action. Art is one of the ways of doing this.

(Top image: Everything is (Dis)connected.)

______________________________

Christine Simpson lives in County Waterford, Ireland. She is employed as a Lecturer on the BA (Hons) Design Communications and BA (Hons) Fine Art at Waterford Institute. Outside of academia, Christine is a practicing artist. Recently, the National Museum of Living Treasures in Tokyo purchased The Erosion of Eden, and she was invited to show at The Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin. She has received numerous awards including the Waterford Crystal Arts Award; a Gold Award from Graphis, New York; and The Silken Photo Award, Brussels. She was shortlisted in the top ten for the Sony World Photography Awards. Christine’s work is in many private collections.

 



About Artists and Climate Change:



Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

The Green Arts Conference

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Save the Date!

We are pleased to announce that The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability will take place on Wednesday 1st November 2017, this year at Partick Burgh Hall in Glasgow. Creative Carbon Scotland will be hosting a full day of discussion on how and why the cultural sector is creatively approaching environmental sustainability.

Building on the success of  50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector (2015)and 51 Shades of Green: Action in the Arts (2016), this year’s conference will highlight and share the innovative steps the sector is taking to reducing its enviornmental impact, and challenge how the arts can contribute to a more sustainable Scotland.

Whether you’re a Green Arts Initiative member, a Regularly Funded Organisation working towards Creative Scotland’s ‘Environment’ Connecting Theme, an arts venue keen to find out what your peers are doing, an arts company who has been working on sustainability for years, or just coming to sustainability in the sector for the first time, there will be something for you!

To register your interest and share your ideas, please find our event page here. By registering you will be the first to hear when tickets become available for the event.

If you have any further questions, please contact catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com.

 



The post The Green Arts Conference: Spotlight on Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Opportunity: Stalled Spaces Glasgow

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Local groups & organisations across Glasgow are invited to submit proposals for temporary activation of stalled or underused open spaces in the city. Funding of up to £4,500 available.

Have an idea for the temporary activation and improvement of a stalled or underused open site in Glasgow?

With Stalled Spaces there is an opportunity to bring value to the activation of derelict spaces in the city through the use of arts, design, and cultural activity; creating connections between people and spaces and creating social, economic, environmental and cultural value in order to build more resilient communities for everyone.

Stalled Spaces are particularly interested in projects that:
• are imaginative in the processes employed to have the desired impact;
• contribute to the development of artistic practice, particularly where that involves working with site and community;
• demonstrate a clear and considered approach to public engagement which will create an effective dynamic between the artist(s), the community and the site involved.

For more information, and to submit an application, go to the Stalled Spaces website.

Closing Date for applications: Friday 18 August 2017

Image credit: Rollmo Design, Alex Reece

 



The post Opportunity: Stalled Spaces Glasgow appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.



 

About Creative Carbon Scotland:

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland