Yearly Archives: 2016

Of Nature: Symposium – Friday, Nov 11 at Wave Hill House

Tickets will be available beginning Tuesday, October 4

How do artists engage communities, increase awareness about urban ecology and conduct projects that remediate environmental problems? Be part of the conversation at this all-day symposium, which brings together wide-ranging thinkers and spotlights New York City projects with a focus on the Bronx. Wave Hill is convening a day of discussions to accompany the retrospective Jackie Brookner: Of Nature. The topics and presenters reflect her interest in collaboration, water, remediation and community action and brings together a range of approaches and methods from artists of different generations. The format includes a mix of dialogues, short presentations, with time for exchange and conversation.

Morning Session

  • Lenore Malen: Jackie Brookner as a Force
  • Mierle Laderman Ukeles (artist) and Amy Lipton (guest co-curator): Remediation as a Strategy
  • Hana Iverson (artist and curator), The Breath Project
  • Jan Mun (artist), Greenpoint Bioremediation Project

Afternoon Session

  • City as Living Laboratory Projects, artist/designer led projects that address specific environmental concerns in the Bronx:  Bob Braine(artist), Habitat Fountains; Juanli Carrión (artist), Outer Seed Shadow #03; Alexander Levi (architect, Slo Architecture), Finding Tibbets Brook; Mary Mattingly (artist), Dewitt Clinton Food Forest
  • Alicia Grullón (artist), Percent for Green
  • Stacy Levy (artist) and Jennifer McGregor (Wave Hill Senior Curator): Water as an activator

$40/$36 Wave Hill Member/$30 Student. Ticket price includes admission to the grounds, box lunch and a closing reception in Glyndor Gallery. Registration is required. Seats are limited.

Glyndor Gallery will be open from 9:30AM to 5PM for participants to see Jackie Brookner: Of Nature, and the Sunroom Project Space installation by Denise Treizman.

Bios of the speakers can be viewed here

Building into Water

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

by Guest Blogger Lisa Reindorf

Hurricane Matthew blew into Florida the same night as my exhibit “Building into Water” opened at Galatea Gallery in Boston. The installation, consisting of aerial view paintings, is an interpretation of the coastal ecosystems of Florida.

The aftermath of the storm demonstrated the very issues that I was depicting in my work – the clashes between building and nature that are exacerbated by climate change. Climate change has resulted in floods, waves, and winds that inundate infrastructure and wash away beaches, land, and buildings.

The art that I find most intriguing involves artists confronting social, political, and economic issues. I’ve been an architect, artist, and teacher and I put a lot of thought into why we do things and what is the meaning of our work. My art has been concerned with architectural structures and systems, and their intervention in the natural world. Formally, a grid system is often overlaid with free flowing organic shapes.

Content-wise, I’ve begun focusing on climate change because it is vital to our planet’s survival. As an architect, I dealt with creating structures and considering their impact on the land. My practice has been to minimize negative effects, emphasizing energy conservation and utilizing the land and natural systems in a beneficial manner, such as siting to maximize daylight, reusing water, and minimizing disruption of ecosystems. Now that I am a full time artist, I’ve taken some of these ideas into my artwork.

Artists have a long history of landscape painting, but I wanted to explore current human impact on the land. Land is being drastically reshaped by human intervention and affected by climate change. My work visually addresses the inherent conflict of built infrastructure and ecosystems. Natural systems that have been disturbed by the expansion of man-made structures apply counter-pressure in response to disturbances. In other words, man intrudes into nature and nature strikes back.

Sand, Sludge and Sea

In these aerial views, I depict some aspects of this conflict and its confluence with climate change. By building into natural habitats, we interrupt ecosystems, pollute water, put carbon into the environment, and raise temperatures. Nature responds with storms, flooding, and rising tides. Rampant development has invaded and distorted that natural land formation and the systems that keep it healthy.

I begin by looking at aerial views of coastal areas and maps of cities. While these are my inspiration, the works are visual imaginative interpretations. Each piece portrays a specific issue. I decide on the scale, where some areas are zoomed in close and others depict a larger landscape. These square panels are in multiples that can be recombined and reoriented so that it is a general rather than specific interpretation and viewers can create their own narrative.

Florida Aerial View

Paintings such as Toxic Green and Algae Bloom look at the redirection of natural waterways and polluted aquifers that result in toxic algae blooms. Here, neon green shapes bloom in aqua waters. Sand, Sludge and Sea concern runoffs that contribute to sludge, and sandbars that block natural waterways and reshape land.

The rising sea level and increasing tides that are a result climate change are shown in Florida City Aerial View, where the grid and system of cities face encroaching water and eroding shores. In the pieces Third Wave and After the Storm, man-made islands in vibrant colors of neon pink and day-glow orange project into the ocean, connected by long causeways. They are extremely vulnerable to weather events. Tidal Wave and Tsunami depict strong storms and sea water that inundate the structure of the city. In all these pieces, a systematic structure confronts free flowing organic shapes.

Tidal Wave

Why did I focus on Florida? Florida is literally ground zero for the United States and climate change. Florida’s east coast ranks as the region’s most vulnerable to sea-level rise. Just this week, Hillary Clinton and Al Gore devoted a speech to climate change, which they presented in Miami. They discussed the science behind climate change and concomitant issues such as rising tides and storms.

As the recent hurricane demonstrated, rising sea levels and storm surges inundate cities during major storms. What happens in Florida is just a precursor of what will happen to our coastal areas. Focusing on this issue is particularly important as some politicians even deny the existence of climate change, not to mention its drastic effect on our land.

My intention is not to lecture but to stimulate thought. Artists have a long tradition of exploring the landscape, environment, and planet we live on. We can interpret scientific data and information in ways that are accessible to the public. My hope is to communicate to the audience the urgency of the global climate challenge.

See the article in the October issue of Artscope Magazine for more information.

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Lisa Reindorf is known for her vibrant mixed media works of architecture and landscapes. The color sensibility is influenced by time spent in Mexico in a community of artists. She has a BA in Design of the Environment from the University of Pennsylvania and received her MA from Columbia University. She was also an instructor at RISD. She is represented by Galatea Gallery in Boston, and has exhibited extensively in NY, California, Mexico and Europe.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Ben’s Strategy Blog: Culture/Shift: Working with the Arts for Mitigation & Adaptation

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

CCS Director Ben Twist invites people working on climate change and sustainability to think about how the arts can help them deliver their aims.

Over the summer Creative Carbon Scotland focused more than we have in the past on talking to people and organisations working on climate change and sustainability about the role of the arts in their field (as opposed talking to people in the arts about climate change).

We’ve been doing a lot of thinking (and I’ve covered some of this in one of my other blogs) about the particular role of the arts in working on carbon reduction and adaptation to a new society. My part of this has been to do a number of talks to various groups, from anevent at the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation during the Edinburgh Festivals to aTEDx talk at Heriot Watt University.

I’ve refined my talk over the summer and the structure now goes something like this:

  1. We’re facing a major social change: either we achieve the carbon reduction targets implicit within the Paris Agreement – in which case our relationship with energy and fossil fuels will have to change radically – or we don’t achieve them – in which case issues such as migration, changing food supplies, resource related conflicts and so on will bring about major social change (as they are already).
  2. The Mexico City Declaration by UNESCO provides a useful definition of culture in a broad sense as effectively the way we live in the world.
  3. Using that definition, climate change is as much a cultural issue as a scientific or technical one: it is a function of our culture, our way of living in the world, which is a culture of consumption. We dig up resources, use them and throw them away, and this latter stage is a major cause of climate change. In order to avert more climate change, we need to shift to a culture of stewardship.
  4. This would have useful implications not only for environmental sustainability and climate change but also social sustainability (climate justice but also equalities more broadly) and economic sustainability (perhaps abandoning the search for endless economic growth and following up some of the principles of Tim Jackson’sProsperity Without Growth, for example).
  5. So how do we achieve this cultural shift?
  6. Culture in a narrower sense – what we generally call the arts, but this includes design, film and media, museums and heritage etc – is the expression of culture in the wider sense used above. Art has often been said to ‘hold a mirror up to society’. But it is also therefore a way of understanding, interrogating and changing the wider culture.
  7. The German playwright Bertolt Brecht wrote, ‘Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it’!
  8. Working with the arts is therefore a useful way to work on achieving the cultural shift.
  9. There is often an assumption that the role of the arts in areas such as these is to communicate complex ideas more effectively and particularly to engage the wider public emotionally rather than factually. This is indeed a useful role of the arts, but they can do much more. I have a slide which provides a (non-exhaustive) list of ways in which the arts work.
  10. What Art Does, Some examples:

I think there are interesting ways in which artists can contribute to addressing climate change through making artistic work – CCS is involved for instance in a project led by the RSPB on developing awareness of the importance of the peat bogs in the Flow country as carbon sinks.

And there are also ways in which artists can use their skills, knowledge and ways of thinking in non-artistic projects and settings. After one talk, someone who has been attending the meetings of the Local Advisory Committee of the European Climate Change Adaptation Conference in 2017 came up to me. ‘I realise that’s what you’ve been doing at the meetings,’ she said. ‘You’ve used your role as an artist to make us think about and discuss things we wouldn’t have discussed otherwise.’

This was encouraging, as that’s what I do, although I hadn’t really thought of it as such in that particular situation. And in a way, that’s the point: I was being a member of a group and using the skills I have as a (former) theatre director, just as others in the group use their skills as academics, project managers etc.

This is all part of a strand of our work at CCS called Culture/SHIFT: the artistic and conceptual work that we do alongside, and inextricably linked to, our more practical and technical work supporting cultural organisations to reduce their carbon emissions. There’s more information about this here.

We’re always interested in more people working on climate change and sustainability attending our Green Teases and other events – following our most recent Arts & Sustainability Residency we’re thinking about reserving places for non-artists next year.

Our message must be getting through: we’ve been asked to run a session on this subject at the SSN Conference on 1 November. We’ll run through some of the ways in which we think the arts can support climate change and sustainability work and help participants to think about how this could be useful in their work. Sign up now!

 

Image: Ed Hawkins:Spiralling global temperatures from 1850-2016 

The post Culture/Shift: Working with the Arts for Mitigation & Adaptation appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Art-in-Nature: Enchantment Wrap Up

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

The Moving Clouds (performance) by Minoosh Zomorodina

Within You and Without You (terrace site-work) by Faith Purvey

Park Pool Province (poolside fence work) by Karen Reitzel

Cloud Chamber (aviary site-work) by Ben Allanoff

Enchantment: a feeling of great pleasure, delight; the state of being under a spell or magic; a feeling of being attracted by something interesting, pretty, something that holds your attention.

This month marks the closing of Enchantment at Peter Strauss Ranch in Agoura Hills, California. Three site works were installed in May and the final performance was on Saturday September 10th. Each artist was provided an honorarium by ecoartspace to cover materials and incidentals. It was the fourth successful collaboration between ecoartspace and the National Park Service (NPS); the others, Windsock Currents at Crissy Field in the Presidio (2005), and at the Grand Canyon South Rim Artist-in-Residence Program (2009 and 2012).

Peter Strauss Ranch is home of an enchanting oak woodland that was inhabited for thousands of years by the Chumash people, and later as part of the Rancho Las Virgenes after Spanish Colonization. The modern Pool and rustic Terrace were built in the 1940s when Warren Shobert and Arthur Edeson purchased the ranch and transformed it into Lake Enchanto, an amusement park and retreat. Lake Enchanto closed in 1960. Peter Strauss purchased and restored the ranch in 1976 and lived on site until 1983. The ranch was then sold to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, and the National Park Service purchased the ranch in 1987 as part of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. It is located in the Triunfo Creek drainage.

About the works:

Cloud Chamber: Memories, Dreams and Reflections by Ben Allanoff transformed an existing aviary structure originally built by a former owner Harry Miller, a pioneering automotive engineer who used the ranch as a weekend retreat in the 1920. For this site, Allanoff cut biomorphic shapes from sheet metal and hung them from the top of the wire cage, a symbolism of the birds that once resided there. The reflective shapes were strikingly architectural, while evocative of the spirits or energies that “animate our world and our individual psyches that cannot be grasped,” stated the artist.

Park Pool Province by Karen Reitzel included two panels on the fencing around an abandoned circular cement pool consisting of hand-dyed strips of silk scarf material. One depicting two prancing poodles and poison oak leaves on aqua blue silk, and the other a helicopter with swimming poodle-shaped clouds on fleshy pink colored silk that could be seen from atop of the adjacent terrace. The artist was inspired by the site’s history of leisure, pleasure, and artifice, and the contemporary condition of partly re-natured, drought-stricken lands in close proximity to encroaching development.

Within You and Without You by Faith Purvey located on a terraced hill overlooking the circular pool was an ascending pathway made of natural burlap and orange fabrics cut in a triangular shape. Participants climbing the hill entered a perceptual shift of the mind and an eventual meditative vantage space at the crest. Alluding to the rising stair paths found on Mayan Temples, the artist made use of the sites’ archaic architectural qualities to position her viewers to feel as though they had stepped into the distant past–whether meditating on 8,000 years of Chumash habitation, or the mysterious disappearance of the Mayan civilizations.

The Moving Clouds performance on Saturday, September 10th, by Minoosh Zomorodinia, was sited in front of the aviary where she engaged visitors along a path while they passed through on their way to the Tiny Porches monthly concert series. Dressed in all white, including her hijab, with several layers of shiny silver Mylar sheeting overlaid, the artist performed a series of ritual actions with repetitions of walking, marching, and jumping to animate her concerns for the changing climate. The reflective material was used to visually connect with nature, land, and the physicality of the human body, while re-creating the sounds of the oceans.

Special thanks goes to Ranger Tori Kuykendall who invited ecoartspace to curate this summer art-in-the-park program, and to Ben Allanoff who suggested ecoartspace to Tori and laid the groundwork for Enchantment to happen. Thanks to the artists Karen Rietzel, Faith Purvey and Minoosh Zomorodinia for their thoughtful installations, and again to Ben Allanoff for his dedication to making art-in-nature and his additional installation made with Park staff along with volunteers from Santa Monica College and inmates from Malibu Conservation Camp #13. The playful sculpture made from cut fallen trees on Santa Monica Mountains Recreation Area property is titled Wood/Trees, and was designed and guided by Allanoff as a collaboration to amplify the creative energy and spirit of trees.


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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Opportunity: Cultural Innovation International Prize Climate Change 2016-2017

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

How can culture defy climate change? The second edition of the Cultural Innovation International Prize encourages projects that offer imaginative and effective solutions to one of the biggest global problems of the 21st century. The winning proposal will be included in an exhibition on the subject at the CCCB.

Climate change is one of the central themes of the CCCB’s 2016-2017 programme. In the course of the year we’ll be offering activities, talks and a major exhibition with the aim of addressing what we see as one of the biggest challenges facing humankind.

Year two of the International Prize for Cultural Innovation marks the start of this annual interdisciplinary agenda and opens the debate about the role that culture and cultural institutions can play in helping to address the problem.

Can we analyse global warming beyond catastrophist viewpoints or technological solutions? Can we contribute to the need for an ecological ethic and collective environmental responsibility? Can we act as catalysts of change?

Timeline

Entry and submission period
From 11 October 2016 to 31 January 2017 (at 18:00 CET)

Announcement of finalists
25 April 2017

Presentation and award ceremony
June 2017

Find out more and apply here.

The post Opportunity: Cultural Innovation International Prize Climate Change 2016-2017 appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Partners Sought for Artists’ International Travel Research

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Puppet Animation Scotland and Creative Carbon Scotland are looking for organisational or individual partners to join them in a research project to understand the realities of travel by artists to and from and Scotland and to explore ways of reducing the associated carbon emissions.

This is a valuable opportunity for those planning to apply for Regular Funding from Creative Scotland, contributing to the Environment Connecting Theme.

The project will consider travel planned for 2017/18:

  • November/December 2016 – gather information about planned international travel (overseas artists coming to Scotland; Scottish artists travelling abroad): journeys, related carbon emissions, reasons for travel
  • December/January 2017 – develop action plans for each company or individual that aim to reduce the total travel, the carbon emissions related to the travel or the carbon intensity of the travel (by increasing the artistic activity related to the travel)
  • February 2017 onwards – companies implement the action plans
  • April 2018 onwards – we review the results and report

Creative Carbon Scotland will lead the project which will involve meeting as a group at the beginning and occasionally during the year, plus individual work for each company supported by CCS. CCS will write and publish interim and final reports.

For more information, please contact Fiona MacLennan onfiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com

If you’d like to take part please let Fiona know by 31 October 2016. The first meeting will take place on 17 November.

The post Opportunity: Partners Sought for Artists’ International Travel Research appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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