Yearly Archives: 2016

Opportunity for Artists: Art_Inbetween Commission

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Art_Inbetween recognises that the scale of communities in rural areas necessitates that art practice works across the full spectrum of society. As such, many rural areas are leading the way in socially-engaged practice that is making a significant difference to the way people live and the places that they inhabit.

At the end of February The Stove Network will host a  Summit that brings together rurally based art practices. This summit will be the starting point for the artist commission. Following the summit the commissioned artist will be expected to follow their own line of interest inspired by Art_Inbetween…for example:

  • Exploring the microcontexts of the different rural regions taking part in Art_Inbetween
  • Mapping art practices and interrelationships
  • A creative visualisation of contemporary rural art practice

There is no specific geographic base for the art commission, but the project will be managed by The Stove Network in Dumfries and the other practice teams taking part in Art_Inbetween (Northumberland, Scottish Highlands and South Wales) will be available as a research resource. It will be up to the artists to be self-directed and resourceful in navigating their way through this commission.

We are open to applications from all different artforms and teams as well as individuals.

Application

  • Expression of interest + examples of relevant past work (to be emailed in common digital format not exceeding 10 MB)
  • Submission of application to info@thestove.org by 5pm on 3rd Feb 2016
  • Interviews in week of 7th Feb in Dumfries
  • Applicants must be available to be in Dumfries for the Art_Inbetween Summit on 25th and 26th February 2016

Timeframe and Budget

  • Commission to be completed by end of April 2016
  • Fee (to include all materials and expenses) £1750
  • Additional budget for documentation/presentation £300

The post Opportunity for Artists: Art_Inbetween Commission appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

From Below: A Visual Arts Reflection on ArtCOP Scotland, Part II

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Read Part I here: A Visual Arts Reflection on ArtCOP Scotland, Part I

Glasgow

December 12

Neil and Zoe

Zoe Walker and Neil Bromwich: The Conch [Sound Studio] 2010-11.

I take part in an event organised by Creative Carbon Scotland and the Scottish Contemporary Art Network (SCAN). The artists, Zoe Walker and Neil Bromwich, talk about their projects including their work with a games designer and a change consultant in Orkney looking at the local response to the renewables industry, which has not always been welcomed. Bromwich explains that their concern with participation and engagement has its simplest roots in the fact that they make art together rather than alone. “If you work in collaboration your thoughts naturally turn to wider issues.”

The year is very old and everyone is very tired. It’s late. We talk about what difference SCAN might make and it is apparent that many of the artists, curators and educators present are already trying to reshape the landscape they live and work in. Many of them are actively modelling the future they want to see. The writer, Rebecca Solnit, argues in her essay Revolutions per Minute that such transformation is all around us, but sometimes it is hard to see. We must slow down to understand the shift in the tenor of our times.

The revolution is in part against the very speedup that has made us all busy, distracted, anxious, and unable even to perceive the tenor of our own times. So it is a revolution in perception and daily practice, as well as against the concrete institutions that spell the misery of everyday life for too many and the destruction of the Earth for us all.

Some of us imagine what slow art might look like. It would model the world differently from the compulsive models of western economies, the economies of consumption and of boom and bust.  It would realise that sustainability is about just that: about sustenance and it would; therefore, believe in long and deep investment in art and artists, stepping away from short termism and frenetic funding cycles. It would recognise waste: needless competition for certain limited resources, the thoughtless replication of tasks and functions. It would stop asking the arts to publicly perform their productivity, breaking the economy of presenteeism, but it would replace it with the politics of true and meaningful presence.

Glasgow

December 16

I think slow art would recognise that art communities are like ecologies, and acknowledge that their knowledge and experience is, like terroir or provenance, unique to a place or time, to intellectual environment and cultural climate. Encouraging specificity, rather than the sprawling globalised uniformity of world-spanning cultural agro-business.  It would recognise and encourage sharing and generosity, not the accelerated sharing economy of precariousness, but genuine generosity across institutions and between sectors.

There are things art needs help with: buildings that must be reshaped, rebuilt or rethought for sustainable purpose rather than show, a development of models that are less reliant on air freight or energy intensive technology, a shift in a compulsive cycle of short term exhibition-making to longer and deeper support for artistic practice and a break in our habit of compulsive travel. But as healthy ecologies often need migratory species, art needs travel and conversation and we should find more sustainable ways to make sure that conversation can continue.

The truth is that for all our earnest anxieties about doing the right thing, the art world is largely a low carbon environment. We know that the transformation needed to halt climate change is on a global scale and it is to governments, corporations and global polluters we must address our demands. It is systems and systemic failures we must attend to. In Huntly, Ian Findlay, a longstanding climate change activist, quoted Buckminster Fuller: “If you want to change the system you just make it irrelevant.”

How do we begin?

We can begin from below. By leading symbolic and practical changes in the way we think, talk and do.

I’ve learned much of what I know from artists and what they have taught me above all is the idea of practice: the small routines and habits that over a lifetime become a way of doing and seeing things differently. The choices and private sacrifices made for a productive public breakthrough. The little daily labours that result in big changes.  The determination that one day looks like contrariness and the next turns out to have been foresight and vision.

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Thomas Butler’s “Anthem” workshop part of ArtCOP Scotland

Art has also taught me that art is at its best when it understands that it alone cannot change the world.

When art serves only an agenda and not the artist it is no longer art but something else. Art is a small community in itself, but it is not one of conformity or consensus: what it has always done best is to speculate and to argue and to think aloud by doing.

In Huntly, I meet a sociologist, Dr Liz Dinnie, from the James Hutton Institute. She is part of an international research project looking at the community projects that are tackling climate change. She tells the meeting: “Often what motivates people to do things is not just necessarily addressing climate change itself. Because climate change is a massive problem, it’s huge; it makes me feel very insignificant when I think about it. But addressing a problem that is real for them, that is local for them.”

Exhaustion is major factor in community projects. Later, over a bowl of beetroot soup, when I ask her what single factor best ensures the success and survival of such community activism, she answers in a single word: “leadership”.

Glasgow

December 17

The artist, Ellie Harrison, is dressed in a boiler suit. She exudes energy and action. She is at CCA to launch a new project The Radical Renewable Art and Activism Fund, “it aims to be a real working funding scheme for artists, but in the way it is set up it is also a critique in the existing funding structures. It aims to support more radicalised and politicised forms of creativity.”

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Ellie Harrison at the RRAAF Launch

Using a crowd-funding scheme, Ellie has commissioned a preliminary report from Community Energy Scotland, a registered charity that provides practical help for communities on green energy development and energy conservation. She plans to support her fund through the generation of energy through renewables, issuing money to artists so that they can work without institutional compromise. She quotes one of the RRAAF founders, Chris Fremantle, ecoartscotland, “This is a great initiative to use the production of one sort of renewable energy to support the generation of another sort of energy.” “As an artist I’m interested in systems,” she says. “Whether it’s political systems or economic systems.”

Glasgow

December 21 

It’s late.

I’m late. I, who prides myself on meeting deadlines, have missed this one. Sometimes I’m a slow thinker. Tomorrow will see the Winter Solstice and the shortest day of the year. Ian Findlay told the Huntly audience about Dr. Karl-Henrik Robèrt, the Swedish doctor and cancer scientist, who founded the international framework for sustainable development known as The Natural Step. Findlay had once asked the doctor what kept him awake at night. His response was immediate: “Loss of stories of meaning.” Robèrt meant loss of culture, loss of knowledge.

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The White Wood in Huntly

I think back to the lesson of the White Wood. It might not be in the oaks that will eventually stand there. It might not be in Ben’s story, even if it is still told three centuries hence. I think it is in the rocks that will push up through the soil. The modern word sustain comes from the French soustenir: to lift from below. I like to think that of that slow lifting, that rising from beneath. Every tiny movement is cumulative. I think how it might become a mighty push.

 

 

With thanks to the artists, curators and organisations who met with me and hosted me throughout ArtCOP Scotland.

Images courtesy of Zoe Walker and Neil Bromwich, Thomas Butler, Radical Renewable Art + Activism Fund and Deveron Arts.

The post From Below: A Visual Arts Reflection on ArtCOP Scotland, Part II appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

H&G, a public outcry – a hysteric fun play about our imminent demise

sadkpap6aqjgk3acdpi6Wild Art is a firecracker new performance company based in Los Angeles.  Its inaugural production, H&G, a public outcry is a hysteric fun play about our imminent demise.  A hyperbolic performance about America’s blooming new fear of extreme weather caused by climate change, the audience is placed in the shoes of Hansel & Gretel to wander through a dreamlike, wild, and surprising journey from drought to flood. Playing at Paloma Street Studios, February 5 – 27, 2016.

Wild Art creates artistic projects that are relevant to NOW, charging people to examine and question the world we live in.  Our performances herald unfettered self expression and are daring, ambitious, visually striking, exciting and never without a sense of danger.

H&G, a public outcry

a hysteric fun play about our imminent demise

H&G, a public outcry is a hyperbolic participatory performance placing the audience in the shoes of Hansel & Gretel, to explore America’s new fear of extreme weather through a dreamlike, hysterical, surprising journey of survival from drought to flood. Poised in a poetic landscape, this powerful live-music performance relies on a distorted performance style filled with shadow imagery and song to express what cannot be put into words.  Drawing from the third worst drought in US history and Hurricane Sandy, source material includes Hansel and Gretel, newspaper articles, American folk and rock songs, and text generated by John Michael Johnson.

H&G, a public outcry Creative Team:
Produced and Created by Allison M Keating
Mother played by Lucille Duncan
Suburbanite by Craig Gibson
Father played by Murphy Martin
Guide by Lisa McNeely
Music Composition by Jonathan Becker
Puppet, Projection, and Poster Design by Hsuan-Kuang Hsieh
Set, Props and Light Design by Mark Kanieff
Musical Director and Sound Design by Jeronimo Rajchenberg
Produced by Nora DeVeau-Rosen

H&G, a public outcry was created through a series of workshops in The School of Theater at the California Institute of the Arts.

Skyward: Painting and Prints by Sukey Bryan

Castilleja School, Anita Seipp Gallery

in conjunction with Global Week on Climate Change

Palo Alto, California

January 4 – February 10, 2016

Closing Reception: Tuesday, February 9, 5-7pm

 Passing, oil on canvas, 75 x 107″, 2014

Gallery Hours:  9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and by appointment.
For further information, please contact Deborah Trilling dtrilling@castilleja.org at 650-328-3160, ext 7878.

Sky Circle: one day, pop-up installation at Castilleja on January 8, 2016 to call attention to the atmosphere. 

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Glacial visions: Sukey Bryan

Kings Art Center

Hanford, California

January 30 – March 13, 2016

Reception: Friday January 29, 2016

5:30-7:30 

 
Ice play, oil on linen, 31 x 79″, 2014

Kings Art Center

605 N. Douty Street

Hanford, CA 

(559) 584-1065

Wednesday – Friday
11:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday
12:00 – 3:00 p.m

Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and most major holidays

Performing Ethos: An International Journal of Ethics in Theatre & Performance

Principal Editor – Carole-Anne Upton , Middlesex University (C.upton@mdx.ac.uk)
Associate Editors

Reviews Editor –  James Hudson, University of Leeds

Performing Ethos is a double-blind peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal which considers ethical questions relating to contemporary theatre and live performance. Global in scope, it provides a unique forum for rigorous scholarship and serious reflection on the ethical dimensions of a wide range of performance practices from the politically and aesthetically radical to the mainstream

Performing Ethos 4.2 and 5.1 & 2. 
List of articles (partial list):

Performing Ethos 4.2

  • A ‘Turn to the Species’: Una Chaudhuri reflects on some of the ethical challenges and possibilities that are emerging from a decade of ecological performance practice and scholarship  – pp. 103-111(9)
    Authors: Preece, Bronwyn; Allen, Jess; Chaudhuri, Una
    This is a research article focussing on the ethical challenges of ecological performance practice and scholarship.
  • Performed by ecologies: How Homo sapiens could subvert present-day futures – pp. 113-134(22)
    Author: Kershaw, Baz
    In this article, Kershaw argues that while humans assume that they possess agencies unique among the species, we are fundamentally performed by Earth’s ecologies and the only hope of averting our extinction is to perform more responsively and ethically with those ecologies.
  • What is YOUR ethic of performance and/as ecology? – pp. 135-138(4)
    In 100 words or less, Performing Ethos contributors and editors answer the above question.

Performing Ethos 5.1&2

  • Locating an Indigenous ethos in ecological performance  – pp. 17-30(14)
    Author: Woynarski, Lisa
    This article argues that an Indigenous ecological ethos is a necessary addition to thinking about performance and ecology.
  • Performing from Heidegger’s Turning  – pp. 37-51(15)
    Author: Grant, Stuart
    This article aims to describe aspects of the performance methodology and philosophy of the site-specific ecological performance group, the Environmental Performance Authority (EPA) and make an argument for the efficacy of the EPA’s work, through concepts from Heidegger’s later writings.
  • How to Duet with a Saguaro – pp. 53-64(12)
    Author: Eisele, Kimi
    Through a series of ‘somatic’ experiments, including one that involved standing with the cactus for an hour, the artist uncovers new meanings of both ‘duet’ and ‘performance’.
  • Mother Earth tied to the train tracks: The scriptive implications of melodrama in climate change discourse – pp. 87-99(13)
    Author: Mancus, Shannon Davies
    This article examines the way climate change narratives have mobilized melodramatic frameworks, by examining An Inconvenient Truth (Guggenheim, 2006) as paradigmatic.
  • Swimming with the Salamander: A community eco-performance project – pp. 119-135(17)
    Author: Kuppers, Petra
    This article uses community writing to explore the ethics and engagements of the Salamander Project, an eco-performance project by The Olimpias, a disability culture collective.
  • Temporary home: An ethical investigation into the ecologies of a homemaking ‘between wheat and pine’ – pp. 65-78(14)
    Author: Andersen, Mads Floor
    How can we produce performance events in an ethical manner, which are built ofs dialogues between the event and the ecological processes in which the event will take place? This article is an investigation of this question through a reflection on the making of Nomadic Arts Festival, Poland 2014.If you have more questions about this journal then please click here or email eden@intellectbooks.com

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From Below: A Visual Arts Reflection on ArtCOP Scotland, Part I

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The first in a two-part series written by Moira Jeffrey on ArtCOP Scotland as she travelled throughout Scotland visiting galleries and organisations participating in the two week long event.

“The old concept used to be: first we make the political revolution and then the cultural revolution. Now we have to think about how the cultural revolution can empower people differently.”

Grace Boggs

“The fantasy of a revolution is that it will make everything different—and regime-changing revolutions generally make a difference, sometimes a significantly positive one—but the making of differences in everyday practices is a more protracted and incremental and ultimately more revolutionary process.”

Rebecca Solnit

Huntly

November 28th

I’m tired. It’s dark. It’s late on a Saturday night. It’s late November.

It’s late. Tonight, I heard from someone, the naturalist, Cliff Jones, who has seen the melting of the permafrost at first hand.

I’m sitting up on a borrowed bed in a cottage in Old Road. My seamless aluminium MacBook pro is on my lap, I know about aluminium. I learned about the energy-intensity of bauxite mining, and its colonial histories, from the work of the artist, Simon Starling, more than a decade ago.  This lovely super light modern material has a dirty past. Starling understands the world as a contradictory flow of energies and histories and ideas and materials. So he drove to Les Baux in France to pick up some rocks and he taught himself to smelt aluminium in a lab in Dundee.

Artists tell stories of sorts and they learn by doing.

I’m checking my email and drafting some notes. A few weeks ago, I learned from a film by the artist, Yuri Pattison, about the coal-fired power stations that drive the data centres that in turn drive the cloud. Tung Hui Hu’s recent book A Prehistory of the Cloud tells me that even back in 2008 cloud computing was responsible for 2% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. He writes: “The long term consequences of the cloud are a world away from the seductive ‘now’ of its real time systems.”

I know I must learn to think beyond the now.

Located within the Bin Forest is the White Wood forest planted by artist Caroline Wendling. Image courtesy of Deveron Arts Facebook Page.

In Huntly, I meet the storyteller, Ben Macfadyen. He is in the Aberdeenshire town on a residency with Deveron Arts, which has been supported by ArtCOP Scotland. Last year the artist, Caroline Wendling, planted The White Wood near the town for her project Oaks and Amity. The wood will spring from 1000 oak tree saplings. 60 of them were grown from acorns collected from Kassel in Germany where the artists Joseph Beuys planted his work 7000 Oaks across the city beginning in 1982.

Beuys placed each oak beside an upended basalt rock. Before they were placed in the ground, the basalt rocks were piled high in public, a visible scar on the city’s public face and a visible measure of how far the project was progressing. Beneath the Scottish soil, Wendling planted rocks gathered from the battlefields of the Western Front. One day, the oak roots will push them up to the surface.

A forest is nothing to look at when it is first planted. It will be 300 years before The White Wood is mature and 1000 years from now when it dwindles and dies. Ben’s job in Huntly is to devise and tell a story that will keep the dream of the White Wood alive while it is slowly, and invisibly, growing.

Ben has organised a public meeting in the town on the theme of Patrick Geddes’s famous aphorism “Think global, act local.” He introduces the meeting with an extract from the Epic of Gilgamesh. The epic, like the bible, includes the story of a flood.

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Ben Macfadyen posing in Paris with the Oak. Image courtesy of Deveron Arts Facebook Page

Ben tells me: “Stories are a powerful tool to shape our way forwards.” Ben is cycling to Paris among thousands of activists gathering for the COP21 talks on climate change. “Just before I set off from the White Wood, carrying an oak sapling all the way to Paris, I heard the news about the Paris attacks,” he recalls. “Suddenly, my whole journey shifted and I hoisted a big white flag on my bike. What started as a journey about climate change instead became something else. On my way instead of talking about fear, or retaliation we talked about peace.”

In the morning, we talk: Ben is 25 and has inherited a world that I, at 48, have helped create or perhaps, a world that I haven’t helped changed enough. He has been a climate change activist since he was 14. Lately he has worked in Glasgow schools helping children learn about nature through drama and storytelling. Ben has suffered from chronic fatigue and has experienced serious illness: he learned to care about the planet alongside learning to care for himself. He understands intimately that our resources are not unlimited. What is the relationship between his work and the question of climate? “I’m trying to think about living that relationship,” he tells me, “and how we can create work that reflects the way we want to be.”

He tells me about an encounter one morning as he cycled through rural Perthshire. He came across three strangers, a woman and her two children. The woman had a falcon on her arm. “It was a hunting animal and an animal of war,” he recalls. “But we talked about peace. It was a very beautiful moment, she was so careful and so conscious in her conversation.”

On the 23rd of January, Ben will be telling the first White Wood Story where the trees are planted in Huntly. More information here.

Edinburgh

November 30th

GCS EP9

ArtCOP Scotland Launch at Gayfield

In Edinburgh, at Gayfield Creative Spaces, December is almost upon us. The gallery has an extensive programme for ArtCOP Scotland. It’s dark and wet again. But we are cheered by a performance by two young people form Firefly Arts in Livingston. At Gayfield, there is an exhibition Re: See It 3 by the artist-led organisation, Edinburgh Palette. There are lovely things on show: upcycled clothes made from recrafted tweed by Rose Hall, and Derring-Do medals: little medals of ribbon and vintage materials. Above me origami butterflies fly. They are crafted from obsolete banknotes.

But looking at all of these things begins to confuse me. It is something to do with the aesthetics of proliferation. I am reminded that there is a danger in the ever-increasing volume of stuff no matter its excellent provenance. Sometimes, the response of arts organisers to any kind of call to action, to crisis or opportunity, is to make more: to commission more activities or spread messages thin and fast rather than working deep and slow.

If we are to build a sustainable future for artists can we also re-imagine art commissioning that practises thoughtful restraint as well as production? Can we make pause purposeful? Can we support slow and significant and meaningful moments of creation and change as much as buzz and activity?

Perhaps I am just tired. I seem disproportionately interested in a commissioned project To Sleep Lightly by the designer, Dawn Ellams, who is reinventing the domestic mattress. I am horrified that the abandoned mattress is a global problem for which there is yet no recycling solution. Ellams is working with Zero Waste Scotland to imagine a future in which mattresses are re-designed to be part of the circular economy. I long for my bed. In Huntly, much of the talk amongst local climate change activists was about exhaustion. Action is tiring: we must learn to manage our personal resources as well as our global ones.

 

Dumfries

December 9

In the second week of December, it rains. And rains. And rains. On television a woman in Cumbria is crying as her home is inundated with flood water. On the radio, I hear a worker from the Red Cross who has set up an emergency shelter. In Dumfries, the railway line is flooded. I speak to someone whose train ride has become a three-hour diversion.

The Whitesands area on the banks of the Nith is flooded again, a problem that is so persistent that Dumfries and Galloway council is in the middle of a huge controversy about how to deal with it, recently opting for the design of a raised bund as a flood barrier for the town. I love the name Whitesands. It takes me a while in the town to understand that much of the area is actually a concrete car park.

Image-4

Image courtesy of the Stove Network

Before the latest flood, curators from The Stove Network, a network of 250 artists in the area, had already chosen their subject for ArtCOP Scotland. Their exhibition called SUBMERGE brings together a number of artists whose work considers water, from the impact of increased rainfall predicted by scientists for the area, to the water quality of the local rivers.

The Stove sounds cosy and rural, but it is actually set in a shopfront in the High Street, which, like hundreds of high streets in small town Britain, has been eroded by supermarkets and out of town developments, the petrol economy and by internet shopping. The shop was empty for five years before The Stove Network moved in.

At the heart of SUBMERGE is a modest proposal entitled We Live with Water.  The project takes the form of a document from the perspective of 2065, speculating that the town has long decided to embrace the river’s flooding capacity and has transformed its waterfront by allowing the river to be wider and its banks re-wilded.

“We are looking at the place getting wetter and wetter,” explains the artist Katie Anderson who has curated the show. “These once in a lifetime flooding events will happen more and more. This is a river-facing town, and the river is potentially one of our most beautiful places, the town has turned its back on the river and we are really excited about how we can engage with that.” The Stove Network has not taken a public stand on the flood barrier proposals instead it is promoting a wider conversation about what the river means for Dumfries.

The artist, Matt Baker, sends me a blog he has written about SUBMERGE. “Richard Arkless, MP visited his constituents in Dumfries on Monday 7th December 2016 to inspect the aftermath of the flooding from the previous weekend. He heard rumours of an alternative plan for the town and the river during his visit and collected a copy of We Live With Water to take back to Westminster as a potential way forward for our town.”

 

Glasgow

December 10

I admit I have struggled a bit with my visits to the country. In Scotland’s cultural frameworks, I think the idea of the rural risks the country becoming a symbolic place rather than a real one: a place where art sometimes acts out a fantasy of a better, purer world. What I think I saw in Dumfries and Huntly was only too real. These are complicated communities locked into the same global problems, places that are often under duress or contradiction.

If culture is to confront climate change, nature must not just be a place of privileged retreat or a dreaming place for an elite culture. We must understand the pressure on our countryside in a more nuanced way. And we should remember that wherever we are, our future can be built here and now, not there and then. Globally in the cities we can and should make change. It is in the cities and The City where we must make a difference.

Part II will be available shortly.

With thanks to the artists, curators and organisations who met with me and hosted me throughout ArtCOP Scotland.

The post From Below: A Visual Arts Reflection on ArtCOP Scotland, Part I appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Remake/Respond/Repeat Workshop

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

In this four-week project, you’ll experiment and make new artwork in response to ideas and techniques shown in our current exhibition Another Minimalism: Art After California Light and Space. You’ll work with artist Jake Bee and your peers to explore the creative potential of colour, light, space and materials using a range of everyday objects including lamps, fans and sound recorders then and use them to make experiential art installations and sculpture. Another Minimalism shows artwork that causes profound shifts in our perception by the simplest and most transparent of means – coloured light gels, mist and the deployment of after images. Others use tinted glass, mirror, resins and highly-coloured metals.

These workshops are social and informal, and include making, discussion and collaborative work to experiment and develop ideas leading to the group exhibition at The Fruitmarket Gallery on Saturday 27 (11am–6pm) and Sunday 28 (12–5pm) February 2016.

Workshops take place at The Fruitmarket Gallery, 45 Market Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1DF every Thursday in February from 6-8pm. We can support your travel costs from Edinburgh and the Lothians. Snacks and refreshments are provided.

The post Opportunity: Remake/Respond/Repeat Workshop appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: Competition for Young Designers

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Theme for 2016: PACKAGE UNLIMITED!

Create a package with secondary use.

We are looking for imaginative, multi-functional and detailed packages that can be used for several purposes. Create an innovative package and show how packaging doesn’t have to end up in the trash. Think of a package that blooms after use, a special pencil case, or a package that becomes part of the product after opening. Create an imaginative and thoughtful package for your favourite product, which could be used for better handling of the product after unpacking, or be used for decoration. Discover the possibilities of paper! Create a package so graphically eye-catching, that nobody would want to throw it away. Take time exploring design solutions and finding additional packaging functions!

Deadline: March 25, 2016

Comepetition Prize: €1,100

More information: http://young-package.com/young-package-2016/topic/a345

The post Opportunity: Competition for Young Designers appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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