Yearly Archives: 2016

Jackie Brookner, Of Nature: A Retrospective at Wave Hill

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

The opening reception for Jackie Brookner: Of Nature will take place at Wave Hill on Saturday September 17th from 2 – 4:30pm. This will be the first retrospective tracing the expansive work of Jackie Brookner (1945–2015), an artist who was deeply engaged with the environment. Brookner’s groundbreaking, remediative sculptural environments were designed as ecological filters to cleanse gray water, urban storm water or agricultural runoff. This exhibition will connect the underpinnings of Brookner’s early sculptures and drawings to her ongoing exploration of materiality, which was informed by bodily touch and, particularly, the human hand.

Spanning Brookner’s entire career, the exhibition will include a selection of bronze sculptures from the 1980s and her seminal Of Earth and Cotton project, which traveled through the South in the 1990’s, including video interviews with cotton field workers by Terry Iacuzzo. Documentation of her commissioned water remediation projects in San Jose, CA; West Palm Beach, FL; Cincinnati, OH; Fargo, ND; and Salo, Finland will also be presented along with a selection of her studio drawings that were never formally exhibited.

Brookner wrote in 2010 that her first 20 years as a sculptor were “a period of introversion” that led eventually to the realization that her “work could be ‘of’ nature, rather than ‘about’ it.”  Over the next 20, she adds, “I have learned that beyond the science and the practical function, successful ecological restoration/remediation demands addressing the societal/cultural values that have allowed humans to dissociate from and be at war with the natural systems of which we are part.”

In addition to these fundamental themes, the influence of feminism is evident in her mixed-media rubber and fabric sculptures, work that materializes the inner body. Ultimately, Brookner found her place in the vanguard of artists who are catalysts for environmental and social change. In her first public art projects, she sought out places where she could be part of a team to remediate tough ecological questions, collaborating with scientists, planners and other artists, notably Susan Leibovitz Steinman and Angelo Ciotti.

Jackie Brookner (b. 1945 Providence, RI; d. 2015 New York, NY) was based in New York City during her entire artistic career. A passionate teacher, she inspired students at Parsons The New School for Design from 1980 until the time of her death. From 2000, she created public projects for wetlands, rivers, streams and storm-water runoff that unite water remediation and public art. Throughout her career, she exhibited widely and was included in many publications on the topic of public art and environmental remediation.

Jackie Brookner: Of Nature is curated by ecoartspace NY curator Amy Lipton and Wave Hill Senior Curator Jennifer McGregor. The exhibition will run from September 13–December 4, 2016. An illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition. Plans are underway for the show to travel, and potential venues are currently being sought.

An interview with Jackie Brookner and ecoartspace founder Patricia Watts can be viewed here as well as her website and TedTalk interview

Wave Hill Public Programming with the exhibition includes:

September 17, 2016, 2–4:30PM, Fall Exhibition Reception, with curators’ tour at 3pm.

November 11, 2016, 10:30AM–5PM, Of Nature Symposium. Celebrating the legacy of Jackie Brookner, this day of presentations and conversation will reflect on the artist’s contributions, and will spotlight environmental, socially engaging projects that artists are pursuing around the country. Featured conversations include Stacy Levy with Jennifer McGregor, and Mierle Laderman Ukeles with Amy Lipton.

For further information, a complete press release or images please contact:
Martha Gellens 718.549.3200 x232 or marthag@wavehill.org

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Tim Ingold: ‘The Sustainability of Everything’

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

There was an interesting piece in the NY Times recently entitled Against Sustainability questioning the meaningfulness of ‘sustainability’ and offering a critique of the nostalgia-based version,

We will get a very different ‘take’ on this issue from Tim Ingold, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen, activist for better universities, and author of numerous books including Line: A Brief History (2007),Being Alive (2011), Making (2013) and The Life of Lines(2015).  Ingold’s anthropology is more humanities than social science and he is frequently cited by artists.  His current European Research Council funded project Knowing from the Inside involves a number of artists.

Ingold will ask,

Saturday 10th September, 11am
Fairfield Hall, The Pearce Institute, 840-860 Govan Rd, Glasgow G51 3UU

This public talk is free to attend, although we ask for donations towards the room rent and future CHE/GFU events. Please book your ticket here as places are limited: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2591625

Please spread the word by sharing the attached poster (The_Sustainability_of_Everything) among your relevant networks, or on social media. Thanks!

Event facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1104818026253422/

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Tickets Now Available for 51 Shades of Green

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re excited to announce that tickets are now available for 51 Shades of Green: Action in the Arts!

This full day conference will explore the variety of creative and innovative actions being taken to reduce the environmental impact of the arts, and engage the sector in sustainability.

Held at the Pearce Institute in Glasgow, it is for anyone working in the arts, and specifically for those working in arts organisations in Scotland.

Click here for more information on what to expect, and to read about last year’s conference.

If you have any questions about the conference, please get in touch with Catriona on catriona.patterson@creativecarbonscotland.com

The post Tickets Now Available for 51 Shades of Green appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for Papers: American Theatre and Performance in the Anthropocene Era

Journal of American Drama and Theatre

Special Issue: American Theatre and Performance in the Anthropocene Era 

The American Theatre and Drama Society invites submissions for the Spring 2017 issue of the Journal of American Drama and Theatre. Membership in ATDS is not required for submission of an article, but submissions from ATDS members are especially encouraged.

According to world geologists, humanity is currently living in the Holocene Era, which began 11,700 years ago and facilitated the flourishing of present life on the planet, especially the population explosion of Homo sapiens. Since the 1980s, however, many scientists have pushed to rename our contemporary geologic era the Anthropocene, in recognition of the fact that the activities of our species are now becoming the single most important cause of planetary change – from punishing weather patterns, to vanishing coastlines, the killing-off of thousands of species, and the threatened deaths of millions of human beings. Indeed, the social and political effects of climate change (including civil wars, mass emigrations, and heightened threats to individual rights and democratic government) are often a part of these discussions. While scientists continue to debate the proposal to rename the present geologic era, they also disagree about when the Anthropocene might best be said to have begun; though some set its start 5,000 years ago, with the beginning of the Agricultural Revolution, many date it from the Industrial Revolution of the 1760s, when carbon emissions began to spike. As legal scholar and author Jedediah Purdy notes, “[Determining the parameters of the Anthropocene] is not a statement of fact as much as a way of organizing facts to highlight a certain importance that they carry.”

Similarly, this CFP invites scholars to reconsider the “facts” of the past, the present, and the likely future of American theatre and performance in the light of these debates about the “importance” of the Anthropocene Era. Below are some questions authors may wish to pursue for this special issue of JADT:

  • How did theatrical production and reception in the Americas become entwined with the Industrial Revolution?
  • What did “nature” mean in popular American drama? How have the meanings of this key term changed over the years?
  • In view of our current concerns about the causes and effects of climate change, how might “Indian plays,” “working-class theatre,” “immigrant drama,” and other traditional categories of scholarship in our discipline be reinterpreted?
  • What is the carbon footprint of a typical blockbuster musical in New York City today? On the road?
  • How are contemporary American playwrights and companies addressing the concerns of global climate justice?
  • In the current debates about the Anthropocene, scientists have become evolutionary historians, taking positions about global change on the basis of their understanding of major trends in the past that have culminated in a dangerous present and what might become a disastrous future. Might performance historians construct a similar and plausible narrative arc about the future of performance in the Americas? Is a more optimistic narrative also plausible?

Manuscripts (5000 – 7000 words) should be prepared in conformity with the Chicago Manual of Style, using endnotes, and submitted as attachments in Microsoft Word format. All correspondence will be conducted by e-mail. Submissions must be received no later than December 1, 2016. Please e-mail queries and articles to Bruce McConachie, Guest Editor, bamcco@pitt.edu.

For more information about JADT, see http://jadtjournal.org

For more information about ATDS, see http://www.atds.org

Save the Date: 51 Shades of Green

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We’re excited to announce the date of our second annual conference!

51 Shades of Green: Action in the Arts will take place on Thursday 27th October 2016, returning to the Pearce Institute in Glasgow for a full day of discussion around the key actions the arts sector is making to reduce its environmental impact.

Last years conference (50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector) saw attendees from across the arts sharing their experiences, inventions and approaches to carbon emissions reporting and engaging others with environmental sustainability. This year we’re matching the sharing of best practice with a focus on taking the next step towards carbon reduction, and building the momentum towards action in the arts.

Whether you’re a Green Arts Initiative member, a Regularly Funded Organisation working towards Creative Scotland’s ‘Environment’ Connecting Theme, an arts venue keen to find out what your peers are doing, an arts company who has been working on sustainability for years, or just coming to sustainability in the sector for the first time, there will be something for you! Find out more FAQs here.

To register your interest (and be the first to hear when tickets become available), enter your details and ideas here: http://www.creativecarbonscotland.com/save-date-51-shades-green/

The post Save the Date: 51 Shades of Green appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Imagining a Climate Ready Future: Cultural practices in place-making and social transformation

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Call for Arts and Humanities to join in a climate change conference and help shape thinking about our future

ECCA 2017 is Europe’s major conference on preparing for and resilience to climate change, and it’s happening in Glasgow from June 6th – 9th 2017. Creative Carbon Scotland, Sniffer and Future Earth Europe are keen to encourage artists and others working with culture and climate change to join in the conference. Your contribution can take any form that can be incorporated into the conference format: short performance, intervention, digital engagement or a traditional slide presentation. Surprise us!

The ECCA2017 website seeks contributions under Cross-cutting and Sectoral themes (see below). To ensure that audiences from other fields see the potential of culture in this area we are proposing to the selection committee two ‘sessions’ under the banners Arts and Place-making and Arts and Social Transformation, and encouraging them to spread arts and humanities contributions throughout the conference in relation to their theme. We therefore encourage you to propose contributions under one of the two banners as well as identifying one of the themes below which most closely matches your work. This will mean that the programme committee that assesses proposals will know to consider yours within one of the themes but also considers it alongside other contributions from the arts and humanities.

The deadline for proposals is 30 September. Please head to the ECCA2017 website for details of the submission process.

ECCA Cross-cutting themes

  • Evidence for action: data, climate services & communication
  • Planning ahead: delivering resilience in the face of climate uncertainty
  • Business and finance: mobilising investment in climate change adaptation and building low carbon, climate resilient economies
  • Making it happen: organisations, policy, governance, justice & ethics
  • Working together: co-production of knowledge between science, business, policy, practice and local communities
  • Adaptation in practice: case studies, monitoring, support tools and guidance
  • Global challenges: climate adaptation and the UN Sustainable Development Goals
  • Whole system sustainable solutions: acting across multiple sectors and scales

Sectoral themes

  • Urban, energy and infrastructure
  • Agriculture & forestry
  • Water security & flooding
  • Biodiversity, ecosystem services & nature-based solutions
  • Health & wellbeing

Our background rationale for calling to the Arts and Humanities to join us
The more extreme projections of climate change suggest that adaptation preparedness needs to go beyond incremental ‘change around the margins’ to curating transformed societies with resilience for a sustainable and climate ready future. Such high-end climate change brings altered growing seasons, flooding, drought and other extreme weather to which our local cities, our food chains, and our infrastructure, are mostly maladapted. Low-end climate change requires equally big changes for societal and technological transformation from high to zero to negative emissions. Both adapting to high-end and delivering on low-end climate change challenge all our values and preferences for a ‘steady state’ and require a large amount of hope and imagination. How are the arts and humanities helping to bring about these changes?

Asher Minns, Head of Communication Future Earth Europe

Ruth Wolstenholme, Managing Director Sniffer

Ben Twist, Director Creative Carbon Scotland

The post Opportunity: Imagining a Climate Ready Future: Cultural practices in place-making and social transformation appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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