Yearly Archives: 2016

EMBODYING ENLIVENMENT – Queer, SM and Eco-Sexual Perspectives

The Festival on the Art of Lust

EMBODYING ENLIVENMENT – Queer, SM and Eco-Sexual Perspectives

Symposium curated by Dr. Sacha Kagan

July 22-24 2016

In an age where the modern myths of Mastery and Control have started to crumble down, the rediscovery of the body, of one & many ecology/ecologies, and of intelligence beyond the narrowly rational intellectual realm, is opening up new perspectives for transformation of individuals and society.

Corporeal practices allow us to learn through embodiment, whether they are sexual, gender-related and/or otherwise exploring new territories of self and others. But how do these practices relate to existing social order? How far do they maintain the status quo, titillate social change, or even maybe foster deeper social transformation?

This symposium will explore some alternative cultures in their relations to mainstream cultures. It will investigate individual practices and temporary communities. The guest speakers will introduce different approaches and perspectives, such as Queer, BDSM, Phenomenological Animism, Queer Ecologies, Eco-Sexuality, Metahumanism, and the philosophy of Enlivenement. We will exchange and explore together how knowing and making worlds with the body, rather than ‘against’ the body, relates to philosophical, political and civilizational questions about the kind of society we want to become.

The Speakers:

Andreas Weber Caffyn Jesse Cate Sandilands Elizabeth Wagner
Andreas Weber Caffyn Jesse Cate Sandilands Elizabeth Wagner
Poetics of the Flesh Queer Embodiment Queering Communities:
Becoming (With) Plants
Strategies for
(self)normalization in sadomasochism
Fri 11:00h – German Fri 16:00h – English Fri 20:00h – English Sat 13:00h – German
Sat 18:00h – English Sat 11:00h – English Sun 13:00h – English Sun 16:00h – German
Jaime del Val Robin Bauer Thomas Burø
 Jaime del Val  Robin Bauer  Thomas Burø
Metabody Transgression, transformation,
exuberant possibilities
Our Sad Contempt
for Powerlessness
Sat 16:00h – English Fri 13:00h – English Sun 18:00h – English
Sun 11:00h – English Fri 18:00h – English

Tickets: 3-day pass: 60 € / students 40 € 1-day-pass: 50 € / students 30 €

Full Information and ticketing: http://www.xplore-berlin.de/index.php/en/symposium-en-16

Salzburg Global Seminar Report

Salzburg Global Seminar recently published a report on our session “Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability”. We want to take this opportunity to share the creative thinking that took place in Salzburg with you!

As you will see in the attached report, it was a very dynamic gathering, with participants from around the globe. We are very excited about this program and the momentum that has built around it.

The “art of the possible” is becoming even more relevant as the glow of the Climate Change Agreement adopted in Paris at the end of 2015 gives way to the more sober, and challenging, process of implementation on national and local levels. The arts can be a powerful catalyst to accelerate the changes that need to happen, sooner rather than later!

An online version of the report can also be found here: http://www.salzburgglobal.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Documents/2010-2019/2016/Session_561/SalzburgGlobal_Report_561__online_.pdf

Please feel free to share these materials with others who might be interested, and please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions you might have about the Beyond Green session. Thank you in advance for your interest!

Insect Hotels: How to Design a Dwelling Place for Your Anthropod Friends

Attract Beneficial Insects and Bees With an Insect Hotel

At any given time, your garden might contain over 2,000 species of insects. Some of these are pests, the kind you don’t want in your garden because they destroy your flowers and vegetables. But many others are beneficial insects, the kind you want to attract because they work with you to control pests and pollinate flowers.

Insect Hotels Attract Beneficial Insects

Beneficial insects support biodiversity, the foundation for the world’s ecological balance. An insect hotel in your garden will attract these beneficial insects, offering them a space where they can propagate and hunker down for the winter. Encouraging biodiversity in the garden helps to increase ecosystem productivity.

Placing an insect hotel in the garden increases the chances that beneficial insects will naturally visit your garden. Also known as bug hotels, bug boxes, and bug houses, these human-made structures offer several benefits. In addition to their decorative qualities, they help supplement the increasing loss of natural habitats.

Although altered and heavily landscaped gardens can be beautiful, they often lack enough of the natural habitats needed to attract beneficial insects and encourage biodiversity. Placing insect hotels in your garden offers optimal bug real estate – the right kinds of habitats to attract these beneficial insects, increase their numbers, and reduce the need for pesticides, since these bugs offer biological pest control. A balanced ecosystem provides numerous benefits not just for the individual garden, but for the environment as a whole.

Benefits of Insect Hotels

  1. Supplement the increasing loss of natural habitats
  2. Encourage beneficial insects to help control pests
  3. Stimulate biodiversity and ecological balance in the garden
  4. Offer an opportunity for educating children about how balanced ecosystems work

Natural Pest Control

Welcoming beneficial insects and pollinators into your garden reduces or eliminates the need for pesticides. Poison kills weeds and pesky insects, but poison is not selective: it kills beneficial insects as well.

According to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, three-quarters of the world’s flowering plants and roughly 35 percent of the world’s food crops depend on animal pollinators to reproduce, with more than 3,500 species of native bees helping to increase crop yields. By some estimates, one out of every three bites of food we consume depends on animal pollinators like bees, butterflies and moths, birds, bats, beetles, and other insects.

The Beneficial Insect Community

Albert Einstein once said, “Mankind will not survive the honeybees’ disappearance for more than five years.”

Bees

Once again, Einstein was right. About a third of our food supply depends on pollination. Bees are essential for the production of fruits and vegetables, and their loss is negatively impacting our food chain. In addition to pesticides, the harsh winters and droughts from climate change have also played a role in the declining bee colony population. Gardeners need to remedy this situation by doing whatever is possible to attract bees and help maintain their health and safety.

Honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) refers to the rapidly declining bee population, which poses a significant risk not just to the survival of the bees, but to our survival as well. The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) attributes the decline in large part to the increased use of pesticides, such as neonicotinoids, or neonics, manufactured and promoted by multinational chemical giants. According to the NRDC, 42 percent of U.S. bee colonies collapsed in 2015, a number well above the average 31 percent that have been dying each winter for the past decade. The USDA, however, describes Colony Collapse as a “mystery problem” and contends that there is as yet no proven scientific cause for CCD. Many may disagree about its causes, but all can agree with Einstein that preserving the bee population is essential.

Talking About the Birds and the Bees

Although bees are well known for their role as pollinators, they are not the only pollinators that can be attracted to an insect hotel. Other beneficial insects include beetles, butterflies, green lacewings, leaf miners, white flies, mole crickets, cabbage worms, hummingbirds, and bats.

Beetles

Some say that more than one hundred million years ago, beetles were the very first pollinators. Beetles pollinate 88 percent of all flowering plants — that’s more than any other animal.

Hummingbirds

Here’s an interesting factoid about these little birds: hummingbirds pollinate almost exclusively on flowers that hang upside down. By using artificial flowers to feed the birds and then recording them with high-speed footage, researchers discovered that hummingbirds expended 10 percent more energy drinking from upside-down flowers than from right-side-up flowers. They postulated that right-side-up flowers are more exposed to rain, which might dilute their sweet nectar and therefore make them less desirable for hummingbirds.1

Butterflies

Although not as efficient pollinators as bees, butterflies are still important for pollinating gardens. Unlike bees, butterflies can see the color red, which directs them toward the brightly hued blooms. To attract the opposite sex, butterflies emit pheromones, which are very similar to the scents of certain flowers to which other butterflies are attracted.2

Green Lacewings

Green lacewings larvae feast on the eggs and immature stages of numerous soft-bodied insect pests, including many species of spider mites, aphids, thrips, whiteflies, and leafhoppers, as well as the eggs and caterpillars of pest moths and mealybugs.

Bats

In addition to insect hotels, consider placing a bat house in your garden. Some bats are pollinators, while others are “insectivores” that eat insects. In one night out, a single insect-eating bat can consume 60 medium-sized moths or over 1,000 mosquito-sized insects.

Bats arrive after sunset to assist in pest control by consuming garden pests, while others continue the work of pollination when the bees, butterflies, and other insects have left for the day.

Two species of these nocturnal animals are nectar-feeding, the lesser long-nosed bat and the Mexican long-tongued bat. Bats are very important pollinators in tropical and desert climates. Most flower-visiting bats are found in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands.

The flowers typically of interest to bats are large ones that open at night, are white or pale colors, and emit a musty or rotten scent.

Bats are important pollinators of desert plants such as cacti and agave — from which we get tequila — but they also pollinate much of the vegetation in the rain forest. Over 500 species of fruits and vegetables rely on bats to pollinate their flowers. Avocados, bananas, carob, cashews, cloves, dates, durian, figs, guavas, mangoes, and peaches owe much of their existence to the pollination they have received from these pollinators of the night.3

Insect Hotels: Purchase or DIY?

Different insects require different accommodations in which to thrive. Do a little research about the climate in your area before you decide what kind of insect hotel to buy or make. Each bug habitat performs a different function depending on the location’s climate. In cold climates, they offer a refuge for hibernation, while in warmer climates they function as dry nesting places during the wet season.

While there are many varieties of insect hotels available for purchase, building your own can be a relatively simple, fun, and educational DIY project you can do with children. Using a variety of found natural materials, you can build a bug or bee condo perfect for each type of insect you hope to attract.

Solitary bees and wasps seek places to lay their eggs, so they will be attracted to various-sized holes in wood. They also like to hide out in the open spaces in bamboo poles, which you can cut into small pieces. If drilling holes into wood, vary the sizes from 0.2-0.4 inches in diameter so other species will also fill those spaces. Not-so-nice wood works too: wood-boring beetles love rotting logs.

Reclaimed and repurposed materials such as old pallets, drilled logs, hollow bamboo poles, cardboard tubes, egg cartons, small stones, pieces of concrete and tile, pine cones, pieces of bark, found twigs, dead and rotting wood, hay, plant stems, and discarded planters are some of the kinds of materials that are perfect for constructing a habitat for your garden’s pollination and pest control workforce.

Where to Place the Bug Hotel

A bee hotel needs to be a high-rise to keep away ants, which love dining on bee larvae. Other bug boxes require sheltered but sunny spots surrounded by a variety of flowering and insectary plants (plants that attract and harbor beneficial insects).

Designers from all over the world have created insect hotels that double as works of art. Who knows, maybe you’ll be inspired to build a better insect house – and if all else fails, there’s always ready-made housing you can gift to your bug friends.

Blog: Cinema Verde at the Edinburgh International Film Festival

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Last week as part of the Edinburgh International Film Festival (running from the 15th-26th June 2016), Creative Carbon Scotland hosted ‘Cinema Verde’, an event exploring the myriad ways for the screen sector to affect environmental sustainability.

Cinema constantly reflects and shapes our society: its immersive nature is a powerful force for visualising our current culture, imagining new worlds, and offering alternative perspectives. The opportunity for filmmakers to explore and address the challenging issues of our time whilst improving their own sustainability credentials and finances is a burgeoning area in the sector – and brought to greater prominence with the increasing Hollywood support of the cause:

We heard from a diverse range of panellists during the event, which was held at the EIFF Delegate Hub at the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh.

First up, Mike Day (of Intrepid Cinema) talked to us about his conceptual content choices in directing a documentary that explicitly tackled issues of unsustainability in the Faroe Islands and whaling. Mike explained how he chose to inhabit the creative space between artist and activist when making work which explores such issues, and highlighted the role of the filmmaker in challenging existing conceptions about less-well documented communities.

The Islands and the Whales Trailer from Intrepid Cinema on Vimeo.

Media CoopWe then heard from Lucinda Broadbent of Media Co-op, a Scottish film production company who specialise in creating digital media and films for the third sector and broadcast television. Media Co-op are committed to increasing their positive social and environmental impact, and have been taking steps to reduce the carbon impacts of their production methods. Lucinda focused on the ‘everyday’ actions individual filmmakers can take when trying to work more sustainably, taking us through the start of her day, and the sustainable choices she makes along the way!

Do The Green Thing LogoFinally we heard from Naresh Ramchandani of Do The Green Thing (an international organisation focussed on harnessing the power of creativity to tackle global climate change through ‘playful propaganda’) on the implicit actions screenwriters could take to grow the sustainability consciousness of their audiences. To read about some potential examples of this in practice, you can find their inspiring issue on ‘How Screenwriters are Ruining the Planet’ and watch this short clip below:

How to watch a movie from Do the Green Thing on Vimeo.

 

GAI-WE-ARE-PART-GreenThe Edinburgh International Film Festival is also a member of our Green Arts Initiative: an interactive community of Scottish arts organisations committed to reducing their environmental impact. EIFF has been working on reducing their waste, energy consumption, and business-related travel: even experimenting with video-conferencing guest to avoid trans-Atlantic travel in the past. Find out more on their green page on their website. 


Events like this are just some of the ways through which Creative Carbon Scotland is supporting the screen sector in its efforts to reduce its environmental impact, and think creatively about approaching environmental sustainability.

If you’re working in screen (or in the arts more generally) and are looking for some individual advice improving your environmental sustainability, get in touch!

Fiona (fiona.maclennan@creativecarbonscotland.com) in our team is an expert in all things carbon reduction, and can cannot you with others working towards similar goals. Alternatively, take a look through the links and resources below or on our dedicated page for screen.

The post Blog: Cinema Verde at the Edinburgh International Film Festival appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Create the Edinburgh Festival Sustainable Practice Award piece

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are looking for a maker to create an award piece that embodies and celebrates sustainability to award to the winner of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award.

The deadline is Friday July 8, 12pm BST.

Brief

This is an opportunity for an artist to explore and experiment with social, economic and environmental sustainability in their work, for example in the choice and acquisition of materials or low-impact work procedures. The award piece can be of any form or medium.

The following logos and details will be required on the piece (as engravings or equivalent):

  • Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award title and logo
  • the name of the award winner(s) with the title of their production, and the producer and location of the production (if required)
  • Funder and Partner Logos
    • PR Print and Design logo
    • New Arts Sponsorship Grants logo
    • Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts logo
    • The List logo
    • Creative Carbon Scotland logo

The sustainability aspirations of the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award are to be taken into account in the development of the final award piece. The successful maker will receive a fee of £250, to include any materials used in the award and time put into its creation. The maker will also receive an invitation to the award ceremony in August, a chance to meet the winners and network with other artists working towards sustainability; and they will be showcased on the Creative Carbon Scotland and the Centre of Sustainable Practice in the Arts websites (see last year’s example).

The deadline for award piece applications is 8 July.

The award piece completion deadline is Monday 22 August 2016, and the selected maker must be available that week to engrave the winner’s details on the award in time for the ceremony later that week.

To apply, please fill in the Artist Application form here, and for any further questions please contactluise.kocaurek@creativecarbonscotland.com.

More about the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award

The Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, recognises and rewards shows that strive to engage their company and their audiences in thinking how arts can help grow a sustainable world. Through this, the award aims to promote and inspire artists and companies engaging with these issues and bringing them to the forefront of society. The project began in 2010 and has since then become an official Edinburgh Fringe Award, with the Centre for Sustainable Practice in the Arts and Creative Carbon Scotland partnering with The List,  the New Arts Sponsorship Grant and PR Print and Design.

All Fringe productions are invited to apply and share their ideas on how to make a more just, equal and green world. Applications are open until 12th August 2016, with the winner being announced in a ceremony at the end of August. For details of previous recipients, see our page on the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.


Image: Flickr under Creative Commons Licence

The post Opportunity: Create the Edinburgh Festival Sustainable Practice Award piece appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenFests Blog: Celebrating Edinburgh’s Community Gardens

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

How do you connect local communities, creative performers and environmental sustainability all in one? In our yearly #GreenFests blog series, we have explored many a way to do this, and this weekend’s Power of Food Festival kicks off this year’s blog just as the summer festival season is gaining speed.

Edinburgh’s community gardens will open their gates again this Saturday and Sunday (18-19 June) following last year’s successful inaugural celebrations. Not only will the gardeners themselves be present and their produce be available for admiration and in some cases delectation, but also many of the gardens have organised activities for their visitors.

Making food production sustainable is one of the biggest challenges our society is facing, and inviting, encouraging and educating people about home-grown and communal food is one of the best ways to tackle this issue. The Power of Food Festival and team behind it are specifically promoting environmental sustainability; giving people an opportunity to source their food locally and learn about the processes involved in growing food. Additionally, the Festival and the gardens themselves teach visitors how to use seasonal produce, showcase opportunities for composting food waste rather than sending it to landfill and encourage people to be mindful about their food and their community. In the association’s words: “Community gardens (…) bring people together around a meaningful concept of growing food together.”

It seems like a perfect match to join community artists with community gardeners. Not only are creative activities attracting visitors, but also artists can engage their audiences with sustainability, and show its possibilities and advantages for everyone. The festival may also encourage the artists themselves to do work sustainably, on sustainability or both. Artists of all kinds have the chance to lead and support communities in their awareness of sustainability issues and how to tackle them. Projects like reusing and recycling materials and thinking more creatively can turn a simple shared space like a garden into one shaped by and representing the community tending to it.

The Power of Food Festival is also encouraging people to explore the gardens by bike, offering both a map with cycle routes to those interested and two guided cycle tours from garden to garden, organised by the charity, Sustrans.

The festival runs in the same vein as CCS’ Green Tease event series, connecting cultural practices and environmental sustainability. So have a look at the PoFF programme, check our Sustainable Travel Policy to find out how to best travel from garden to garden, and after a weekend exploring Edinburgh’s Community Gardens get excited about the upcoming festivals organised by members of the Green Arts Initiative.

Image courtesy of the Power of Food Festival Association.

The post #GreenFests Blog: Celebrating Edinburgh’s Community Gardens appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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We need a Percent for Art for Energy

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, Directors of the Land Art Generator Initiative, reflect on another aspect to emerge from the ‘Beautiful Renewables’ workshop hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.

Cities that recognize the value of arts and culture have long benefited from percent for art programs. It has become expected (and in many cases required) for large-scale development projects to invest at least 1% in the arts, especially when there is public funding involved, either by bringing an artist onto the project team to produce a local outcome, or by investing in a fund that is pooled for larger projects throughout the city.

As we increase our focus on large-scale environmental and climate design solutions—resilient infrastructures, environmental remediation, regenerative water and energy projects—it is high time that a similar percent for art requirement be placed on these projects as well. This simple policy standard would bring great benefit to communities that otherwise find themselves left out of the process. Even when their net benefit to the environment is clear, if these projects have not been considered from a cultural perspective, they risk being ignored at best. And at worst they risk alienating the public and sparking push-back against similar future projects.

Involving artists in the process can instead deliver a more holistic approach to sustainability that addresses social equity, environmental justice, aesthetics, local needs, and other important cultural considerations. As we have said from the founding of LAGI in 2008, “sustainability is not only about resources, but it is also about social harmony.”

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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