Yearly Archives: 2015

Away with the birds

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Hannah Tuulikki, Away with the Birds, 2014, Film still, Daniel Warren

Last summer several years’ worth of development culminated in the performances of Away with the birds, written and performed by Hanna Tuulikki and produced by Suzy Glass.

Hanna Tuulikki’s Air falbh leis na h-eòin is a body of work exploring the mimesis of birds in Gaelic song.

Hanna’s vocal composition, Guth an Eòin | Voice of the Bird is the heart of the project. Written for a female vocal ensemble, it reinterprets archival material, fragmenting and re-weaving extracts of Gaelic songs into an extended soundscape. The music emerges from, and responds to, island landscapes and lives. It explores the delicate equilibrium of Hebridean life, the co-existence of tradition and innovation, and suggests the ever-present inter-relationship between bird, human, and ecology.

‘The piece is made from weaving together fragments of traditional songs and poems that imitate or emulate birdsong’ Tuulikki explains. ‘Each of the five movements represents a different habitat and bird community – wader, sea-bird, wildfowl, corvid, and cuckoo. In August we will perform the concert in the historic harbour of the beautiful Isle of Canna, where the music reverberates with the bird-calls and the ebb of the tide. The setting is so important to the piece. The Small Isles are a magical place and, to me, the performance begins as soon as people climb on-board the ferry-boat to make the crossing: the richness of the experience is people sharing a journey.’

Away with the Birds was conceived for and in relation to the Isle of Canna – its ecology, birdlife, history and community. The last custodians of the island, John Lorne Campbell and Margaret Fay Shaw, were renowned folklorists and ethnomusicologists whose extraordinary collection of Gaelic material is housed in Canna House. Steeped in the Gaelic tradition, their hospitality was famous and their home became a hive of creativity, welcoming artists, musicians, scientists and writers from across the world.

Access the interactive score with access to background material, audio and video clips as well as images here.

In this new version of Air falbh leis na h-eòin you become the navigator, steering your own way through Tuulikki’s score. Within its expansive sweep, sound, music, and movement are translated into gesture and precise notation. Words and vocables – sounds without meaning – represent the shapes of individual birds, flocks, skeins, waves and islands, as well as more abstracted forms, suggestive of motion or topography.

You can explore the entire composition in your own time, taking your own course. You can experience the texture of ecology, survey landscape and seascape, immerse yourself in the film, and read detailed notes on the source songs, poems, and birds. This is a prismatic experience that tunes us into a sonic continuum that reaches into the “more-than-human” world.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

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FiberSHED

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

Screen Shot 2015-10-23 at 3.01.21 PMFiberSHED opened October 7th at the Marin Community Foundation in Novato, California. Curated by Patricia Watts, the exhibition presents approximately ninety artworks by twenty-four fiber artists, primarily from the Bay Area, and also includes five artists from Los Angeles, Michigan, and New Hampshire. This survey exhibition includes a cross-pollination of Bay Area environmental sensitivity and conceptual art-making that pushes the boundaries of this medium in exciting and creative ways.

The title FiberSHED is a play on the concept of a watershed, an area of land where water flows from the mountaintops, downward to tributary creeks and rivers, and ultimately drains into lakes and oceans. For this exhibition, the title conveys the exceptional art that is being made by visual artists in the medium of fiber primarily located in the bioregion or “shed” of the San Francisco Bay Area. These are artists who share a unique relationship with the landscape and who are making cutting-edge artworks rich in craft tradition, while reflecting local sociocultural discourse.

Artworks in FiberSHED include: tapestry, samplers, embroidery, felted wool paintings, conceptual hook rugs, photographic transfers on woven fiber, clothes portrait quilts, hand-stitched banners and books, painted weavings, book arts, art and science weavings, felt sculpture, horse hair weavings, and woven measurements of environmental conditions, such as drought and tree rings.

Artists include: Adela Akers, Andy Diaz Hope and Laurel Roth Hope, Anna Von Mertens, Christine Szeto, Diedrick Brackens, Emily Payne, Esther Traugot, George-Ann Bowers, Kate Nartker, Jenne Giles, Lauren Hartman, Lia Cook, Linda Davenport, Liv Aanrud, Liz Robb, Lucy Childs, Luke Haynes, Paul Gillis, Sherri Smith, Stephanie Metz, Tali Weinberg, Topaze Moore, and Victoria May.

For more information on the artists in the exhibition go HERE

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

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Ecoscenography: The Paradigm and Practice of Ecological Design in the Performing Arts

IMG_9096 - CopyAs the deadline of handing in my PhD draws closer, I’m excited about uncovering the potential of Ecoscenography. Here, I share a short summary of my research and the possibilities of contributive practice in the performing arts. 

Contemporary ecological concerns bring with them an opportunity for innovation; to rethink traditional practices and forge new approaches that not only strive for sustainability but also push intellectual and creative boundaries. My PhD research investigates the emerging paradigm of ecoscenography – a movement that seeks to integrate ecological principles into all stages of scenographic thinking and production in the performing arts. The thesis explores the potential of ecoscenography through a series of creative works projects that incorporate ideas of ecological thinking, community engagement and contributive practice.

A major focus is the notion of ‘positive legacies’. Moving beyond recycling and efficiency, my research seeks to investigate a more hopeful paradigm, one where scenographic practices are capable of generating positive and far reaching rewards. In my thesis, I ask: 1) how might designers engage with communities to play a central role in social and environmental advocacy and celebration?; 2) how can stories of place be communicated through scenography?, and; 3) can we create designs that not only enrich our audiences, but our communities and environments as well?’.

TheLivingStage_climbing_the_edible_stageSince starting my candidature, a selection of my creative works have developed under the banner of The Living Stage – a global project that combines stage design, permaculture and community engagement to create recyclable, biodegradable and edible performance spaces. Part theatre, part garden and part food growing demonstration, The Living Stage considers ecological principles and environmental impact as opportunities rather than constraints: ethics that can illuminate, and be integral to aesthetics. At the end of the performances, my living stages are returned to the communities that helped grow them. Physical structures become garden beds and community spaces; plants become healthy food; and waste becomes compost. As each living stage evolves out of a direct response to the localities of site, ecology and community, no project is ever the same.

Since making its debut at the 2013 Castlemaine State Festival, The Living Stageconcept has travelled to Cardiff and Glasgow (UK) and continues to generate interest and inspire other projects around the world. New creative teams have emerged, taking local ecological ideas to engage communities and create positive legacies. Each project is unique, but share clear commonalities: the celebration of multisensory elements, effective and multi-level engagement with audiences, and a legacy that exceeds the celebration of the project through performance. Through projects like The Living Stage, the investigation of ecoscenography has provided me with the opportunity to embark on a new course – to reimagine and cultivate stronger relationships with communities and ecosystems, and to invest directly in their future.

For more information about The Living Stage projects see link below:http://www.tanjabeer.com/the-living-stage/

Sleeping Bag Metamorphosis by Andrea Carr

This post comes from Ecoscenography

This post comes from Andrea Carr – a London based ecoscenographer, artist and co-founder of the ecostage pledge*. Andrea is passionate about investigating the creative potential of repurposing materials in ecological practice. Here she talks about her latest ecoscenography adventure: how discarded camping equipment from UK’s Reading Festival can be given a new life.

How can we inspire one another to make sustainable choices in the creative industries? What are some of the ways in which we can creatively flourish whilst addressing ecological concerns? These are just some of the questions that motivated me for the design of HOAX  Theatre’s  new production exploring mining and climate change.

second.tents at readingLoosely based on Jules Verne’s epic adventure, Journey to the Centre of the Earth, starting in Iceland, three ‘wunderkind’ Geo-Scientists (Flavia Bertum, Ayesha Tansey and Sabrina Manach) from ‘MyGeoCorpse Mining Corporation’ set off in search of precious minerals. As they drill down through the earth’s layers their machinery breaks down, finding themselves lost in the darkness. As panic ensues, they continue on foot, delving deeper into the collective unconscious they begin to unearth the complexities of climate change.

The brief for Journey to the Centre of the Earth was to design four layers of clothing for each Geo-Scientist. This was conceived as part of a series of dramaturgical revelations – with each layer progressing from extremities of cold (at the earths crust) to heat (at the core). Embracing the expedition spirit, I decided to use secondhand camping equipment for my concept. I utilised the particular characteristics (zips, padding and chrysalis shape) of sleeping bags as the first layer of the costume, so that it first appeared as if people are curled up asleep before transforming into unique expedition outfits. The idea was to also depict ideas of metamorphosis and evolution.

My first step to ethically sourcing camping equipment was to contact Julie’s Bicycle (a great resource and champion of sustainability and culture change), who alerted me to the fact that each year volunteers scour the campsites at Reading Festival, as part of the cleanup operation, recovering camping equipment left behind. So while HOAX went on a research and development residency to Fljotstunga Eco-Farm in Iceland (for an invaluable immersive experience exploring the terrain) I joined the volunteers salvage operation.

Perhaps I drew the shorter straw? On the way down to Reading (with Peter, my husband at the wheel) I fretted, “would there be enough sleeping bags left?” But, I need not have worried for nothing could have prepared me for what met my eyes as I stood looking over a sea, not of water, but of abandoned tents! Nevertheless, spirits were high as gloves were excitedly shared amongst the volunteers. I met the Scouts and people collecting for refugees at Calais (all generously providing tips of where the best equipment could be found). It was a pretty devastating sight to see so much discarded camping equipment – but not without hope. It was muddy and stinky (gloves being a must!) but so worth it. By the time my four hour slot was up the light was fading and we had retrieved over forty bags and nine tents, plus other camping bits and bobs for the set and costume design.

IMG_0867It is worth noting that camping equipment is made from synthetic textiles such as nylon, polyester and ripstop derived from the petro-chemical industries (which will take between 20 and 200 years to biodegrade). A sleeping bag is composed of three layers: outer shell (synthetic material), filing (feather or synthetic), lining (synthetic, fleece, silk or cotton), zips – (aluminum, metals, plastic), toggles and cord (plastic and cotton) and polyester sewing thread. It is estimated that 45,000 tents are brought to Reading Festival with 13,500 abandoned at the end of the weekend. The cost of tents (£20) and sleeping bags (£10) has been cited as one of the causes and has changed the nature of camping from a ‘once in a life-time’ purchase to a throw away item.

third (1)The good news is that Reading Festival in collaborative partnership with Julie’s Bicycle, Knowledge Transfer Network and other organisations are pioneering a new project to tackle campsite waste by testing festival-goers interest in services such as tent cleaning and packing away to encourage them to take it away.

Returning from Reading, my flat soon filled with drying sleeping bags – it took 4 days from collection to being ready to use. In my studio, we undertook the wonderful and highly creative process of discovering ways of re-purposing the sleeping bags. This I did with help from my team (Central St Martins graduates: Harriet Fowler, Rosie Elliot-Dancs, Roisin Straver and Elisa Nader) and proved to be more challenging than we had anticipated. The materials had so many layers and surprisingly complex shapes.fourth HOAX IN THE WIND (1)I believe that there is nothing that can give you a deeper appreciation of the resources that go into the production of an item than mindfully deconstructing it. Initiatives and ‘tear downs’ run by places such as FabLab, Hackerspaces, Makersspaces and Restart are great teachers of this process. Once you have experienced this (which I highly recommend!), it becomes increasing difficult to relegate things to the scrap heap. It is a highly insightful process.

There is always a balancing act to consider in any of these ventures – the use of fuel, water and electricity as well as extra support and time. Eco-driven initiatives can take longer than going out and making a direct purchase or even making something from scratch. A deeper understanding and reframing of design and production practices is of vital importance. The materials may cost less, in this case, the total for the van hire, fuel and eco-laundry liquid was £56.00 but the labour was more intense. I believe this needs to be reflected in how budgets are calculated and people’s skills and time valued.

fithMy journey has just begun with HOAX and there will be lots more scope for exciting ecological and creative solutions to inspire the next stages of the design. A work-in-progress presentation of Journey to the Centre of the Earth took place at the Pleasance Theatre, London in October 2015 (as part of ArtCOP21) where I also shared this story as part of a post-show Q&A. The show was a great success, paving the way for a full-length production planned for 2016. My costume also had another outing (worn by Flavia Bertum) at the Omnibus Perception Festival – Voice INTERROBANG: ARTCOP21 opened by Vivienne Westward – where I was given another opportunity to say a few words about the project. As Vivienne snapped a picture of my costume, I did wonder whether it might inspire her next collection!

I personally find it deeply fulfilling when imagination can find creative expression within sustainable practices and this can be linked to helping build awareness around environmental issues – such as, the impact of camping equipment after festivals. While re-cycling and re-purposing was once the remit of ‘poor’ small-scale productions – driven mainly by necessity – production companies of all sizes are now embracing its potential, whether driven by economic or philanthropic concerns. Having witnessed the ‘re-branding’ of re-cycling over the years it is now time to accentuate its opportunities.

Andrea Carr is a scenographer, performance maker and artist interested in the intersection between different disciplines. She is part of a growing community of designers exploring the emerging paradigm of ecoscenography incorporating sustainable practices and  developing ecological projects. She is also a practicing  artist.

*The ecostage pledge (launching in early December) is a new global initiative for the performing arts sector which aims to place ecological thinking at the heart of creative practice.  Join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for updates.

The post, Sleeping Bag Metamorphosis by Andrea Carr, appeared first on Ecoscenography.
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Ecoscenography.com has been instigated by designer Tanja Beer – a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne, Australia, investigating the application of ecological design principles to theatre.

Tanja Beer is a researcher and practitioner in ecological design for performance and the creator of The Living Stage – an ecoscenographic work that combines stage design, permaculture and community engagement to create recyclable, biodegradable and edible performance spaces. Tanja has more than 15 years professional experience, including creating over 50 designs for a variety of theatre companies and festivals in Australia (Sydney Opera House, Melbourne International Arts Festival, Queensland Theatre Company, Melbourne Theatre Company, Arts Centre) and overseas (including projects in Vienna, London, Cardiff and Tokyo).

Since 2011, Tanja has been investigating sustainable practices in the theatre. International projects have included a 2011 Asialink Residency (Australia Council for the Arts) with the Tokyo Institute of Technology and a residency with the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama (London) funded by a Norman Macgeorge Scholarship from the University of Melbourne. In 2013, Tanja worked as “activist-in-residence” at Julie’s Bicycle (London), and featured her work at the 2013 World Stage Design Congress (Cardiff)

Tanja has a Masters in Stage Design (KUG, Austria), a Graduate Diploma in Performance Making (VCA, Australia) and is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne where she also teaches subjects in Design Research, Scenography and Climate Change. A passionate teacher and facilitator, Tanja has been invited as a guest lecturer and speaker at performing arts schools and events in Australia, Canada, the USA and UK. Her design work has been featured in The Age and The Guardian and can be viewed at www.tanjabeer.com

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Land Art Generator Initiative: Glasgow

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Excerpts from a recent Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) blog,

We believe that there is no better tool for creating a tipping point to strong climate action and 100% renewable energy infrastructure than to present a positive vision to the public of what that could look like and the residual benefits that such policies would bring to cities. The opportunity to bring new energy technologies into city planning and creative placemaking projects is at the heart of LAGI. As a part of the design and implementation of constructed works, LAGI educational programming provides the perfect platform for extensive community engagement and participatory design processes, leading to infrastructures that benefit the greatest number of people. LAGI Glasgow is proving to be the perfect example of this ideal delivery model.

In early 2013, we received an email from Chris Fremantle, producer, researcher, and founder of ecoartscotland. Following on conversations he had as a part of Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Teas(e) — part of the European Green Arts Lab Alliance project, Chris wanted to know what it would take to bring LAGI to Scotland in 2015. From the start he was interested in customizing the planning of LAGI Glasgow to reflect the complexities of the debate around renewables and their relationship to key environments in Scotland. The success of renewable energy implementation there since the early 2000′s has figured heavily into land use and conservation discussions and has been extremely relevant to the independence debate.

Continue reading here

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, LAGI Directors, spoke at the first ArtCOP Scotland event in Edinburgh, hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.  Read Creative Carbon Scotland’s blog here.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

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Journey Of The Private Moon | Leonid Tishkov | #ArtCop21

This post comes from MELD

SENECA ANTICAFE, ROMANIA

The Journey of the Private Moon exhibition encapsulates this trip by presenting the photographs made by Leonid Tishkov, maps of the areas affected by industrial activities, videos by the local environmental non-governmental organizations and…The Moon itself.

Rosia Montana

Around late August of 2015 the people of Romania were to observe a rather unusual event: a 2000 kilometer long moonlight path across the country. It was the Moon acting like a marker, drawing a line on the land’s map and our attention to it:

Rovinari

Piatra Craiului National Park – virgin beech forests and areas of complete deforestation;
Trovanții or the growing stones and the depleted deposits of Rosia Montana;
The Santamaria-Orlea stone church full of light, and the small church from Geamana, the erased village, immersed in the toxic, man-made lake for copper deposit and toxic waste;

Living Stones

The walls of the formaldehyde factory from Sebes and the fence of one’s home behind CET Rovinari.
This extraordinary travel was recorded by Leonid Tishkov in twelve photographs and through notes from witnesses, pins on the ecological map and recordings of it.
The Journey of the Private Moon exhibition encapsulates this trip by presenting the photographs made by Leonid Tishkov, maps of the areas affected by industrial activities, videos by the local environmental non-governmental organizations and…The Moon itself.

Podul Dambovitei The Moon and plastic bottle

The post, Journey Of The Private Moon | Leonid Tishkov | ArtCop21, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

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Apply now – MA in Ecology and Contemporary Performance application period is on January

“Metsäesitys”, Theatre Academy of the University of the Arts Helsinki 2015. Photo: Antti Ahonen.

MA in Ecology and Contemporary Performance (MAECP) is a two-year pilot of a master’s degree programme, which studies questions in ecology and performance in the era of ecological crises through a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary approach. It starts on August 2016 and admissions are held on spring 2016.

MAECP focuses on performance in the current era of ecological crisis. It investigates different forms of performance, their methodology and theoretical bases in the borderland of science and the arts. Its aim is to develop co-operation, interaction and methods of performance, as well as develop the foundation and practices of work that transcend the borders between art and science. In this manner it strives to respond to the challenges posed by the ecological crisis that will affect all species.

The structure of the program aims to enable collaboration and dialogue on various levels: between the students, between the students and the teachers/mentors, as well as between various degree programmes, academies and artistic and scientific communities. It also supports intensive and extensive collaboration and networking with artists and other professionals, both in Finland and abroad.

How to apply?

We are looking for 6 – 8 artists from all over the world, who are willing to undertake new research in the emerging and combined fields of ecology and contemporary performance.

Next application period is 8 January-27 January 2016.

Selection criteria:
http://www.uniarts.fi/sites/default/files/MAECP-2016.pdf

MAECP homepage:
https://www.uniarts.fi/en/maecp

Application and admissions:
http://www.uniarts.fi/en/apply-to-theatre-academy

University of the Arts Helsinki

MAECP is a Helsinki-based master’s degree programme pilot. It is a part of University of the Arts Helsinki’s curriculum in 2016-2018.

This new university was launched in 2013 upon the merging of the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts, Sibelius Academy, and Theatre Academy Helsinki. The university now comprises the three academies, which offer a lively and innovative platform for studying performing arts. Helsinki is a vibrant city with a large population of international students attending several local universities, and anincreasing population of economic migrants and refugees. Situated on the Baltic Sea, the city is surrounded by forests, islands, wetlands, fractal coastlines. English is now  widely spoken along with Finnish and Swedish, and several other languages.

www.uniarts.fi/en

Eden | Olga Kisseleva | #ArtCop21 | Art Museum Beijing Art Academy China

This post comes from MELD

The artiste Olga Kisseleva works of bringing extinct species back to life, or of creating new species on the preexisting base of DNA. A truly artistic utopia, assuming that extinction, can be revoked thanks to the advancement of contemporary human civilisation.


Nowadays, a lot of extinct vegetable and animal species can be classified as being “physically extinct, but not genetically”. These species have disappeared as a result of global warming and its immediate consequences on their natural habitat and their living conditions. Their DNA has nevertheless been safeguarded and preserved in laboratories or museums, and can therefore be reactivated by scientists. Thanks to the advancement made through research in the domain of genetic technology, DNA can be used as a base in the rebirth of the species to which it belongs, the exception being with the dna of animals who lived a very long time ago. That of dinosaurs being a good example; they are classified as being “physically and genetically extinct”.

One of the directions explored by bio-art and the artist Olga Kisseleva is the possibility of bringing extinct species back to life, or of creating new species on the preexisting base of DNA. A truly artistic utopia, assuming that extinction, despite its supposedly definitive and irreversible characteristic, can be revoked thanks to the advancement of contemporary human civilisation. the realization of this utopia therefore allows for the preservation of biological diversity, the reestablishment of weakened ecosystems and the deletion imagined by the damage caused to nature by man.

25 NOV – 27 DEC 2015, 9:30am – 4:30pm

ART MUSEUM OF BEIJING FINE ART ACADEMY, CHINA

The post, Eden | Olga Kisseleva | ArtCop21 | Art Museum Beijing Art Academy China, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

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Tuvalu : An Island In The Heart Of A World In Mutation | #ArtCop21

This post comes from MELD

Tuvalu is an art installation in the public spece of Aubervilliers market, echoing the local, territorial and world mutations. This is both a garden of the already there and a forum for the mutation.

Tuvalu in Aubervilliers

Here, Tuvalu is an art installation related to Aubervilliers market redeployment in the new passage Henri Alleg.

Installation is firstly a pleasant place, both bench for users of the market, garden made with stones from demolitions and terrace for multiple associative s uses. On the other hand it’s a manifest on the issue of re-use, using materials from the site set in motion by the construction process and questioned consumption and hyper-mobility of resources by looking through the prism of urban metabolism.

Tuvalu in the Pacific

Elsewhere, Tuvalu is a Polynesian archipelago; it is one of the smallest state in the world, its inhabitants, the Tuvaluan are six times fewer than those of Aubervilliers. Tuvalu could be by the end of this century, the first state to disappear under water due to global warming.

Its population already expatriates in bulk, but do not get to climate refugee status. Tuvalu became a symbol of the effects of climate change: how our lifestyles here questioning those elsewhere?

The approach HQAC * Aubervilliers led by the artist Stefan Shankland is supported by : The City of Aubervilliers, the Agglomeration of Community Plaine Commune , The Department of Seine-Saint-Denis , EPA Plaine de France , the DRAC Île-de-France , the RATP .

démarche HQAC logo

The post, Tuvalu : An Island In The Heart Of A World In Mutation | ArtCop21, appeared first on MELD.
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meld is an ongoing interactive global art platform and collaborative catalyst to commission, produce and present ground-breaking and evocative works of art embedded in the issues and consequences of climate change. meld invites exceptional artists and innovative thinkers dedicated to the moving image and committed to fostering awareness and education to join us in our campaign for social change. Through a collaborative dialogue, we hope to provoke new perceptions, broaden awareness and education and find creative solutions concerning climate change, its consequences and its solutions.

meld was formed by a devoted group of individuals guided by a passionate belief in the power of art to convey personal experience and cultivate social progress. meld is inspired by the idea that when art melds into the public realm, it has the power to reach people beyond the traditional limitations of class, age, race and education and encourage public action.

Go to MELD

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Open Call (UK): Climate Change in Residence: Future Scenarios

APPLY NOW to be artist in residence.

We are seeking three artists to take part in a new form of arts residency, offering access to a network of climate change researchers across the UK. Each residency includes an award of £10,000.

We welcome applications from individuals and collectives from any artform to work on new creative projects engaging with scenarios of climate change.

This project, sets out to test the idea of ‘networked residencies’. Climate research has long relied on networked collaborations rather than individual, geographically-located centres.

Through these residencies, you will be able to research the issue of climate and spend time exploring and developing your own artistic practice. In this way we hope you will introduce a new cultural depth to public conversations around future scenarios.

Applications for this residency are made by submitting the attached form by Monday 15 February, 2016, 5pm. The residencies will take place between June 2016 and May 2017.

Before applying, please ensure you have read the background information document which describes the project in more detail and sets out some terms and conditions. There are contact details on there should you have any further questions.

Download background information PDF

Download application form PDF