Yearly Archives: 2015

Radical Renewable Art + Activism Fund – Kickstarter

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Originally posted on power culture:

RRAAF (Radical Renewable Art + Activism Fund) will use a wind turbine to generate renewable energy to fund a ‘no strings attached’ grant scheme for art-activist projects.

photo-originalMy name is Ellie Harrison and I’m an artist based in Glasgow (UK). I’m fundraising for “phase 1” of an ambitious new project called the Radical Renewable Art + Activism Fund (RRAAF), which, once set up, will be a new and autonomous alternative funding scheme for art-activist projects in the UK.

By supporting this Kickstarter, you will become a RRAAF Founder – helping to raise awareness for the project and fund the initial scoping work being carried out by Georgy Davis fromCommunity Energy Scotland. This will be completed ready to be presented at our Launch Event at CCA Glasgow on 17 December 2015 (6:30pm), where we will outline plans for how we can make RRAAF a reality in the coming…

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Professor of Art and Ecology/Land Arts of the American West Endowed Chair

The Univeristy of New Mexico is looking for a Full Professor of Art and Ecology. This is a tenured appointment with five-year renewable contract as Land Arts of the American West (LAAW) Endowed Chair. Full time. Works with LAAW Field Program Director and area faculty to further develop the LAAW program and increase the national and international profile of Art and Ecology at UNM. Directs the Land Arts Mobile Research Center and administers the existing Andrew W. Mellon grant. Must have the desire and ability to work with and further attract a diverse student population.

The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, a city of 600,000 on the Rio Grande at an altitude of 5,200 feet. Albuquerque’s historical pluralism gives the city a fascinating mix in terms of its arts, cuisine, languages, and values. The University of New Mexico is a large, diverse state university with a faculty of over 3,000 serving approximately 32,700 students. The Department of Art and Art History offers the B.A., B.F.A., M.A., M.F.A., and Ph.D. degrees.

The University of New Mexico is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and Educator.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • MFA or PhD in Studio Art or Master’s with 7 or more years of experience in the field of Art and Ecology
  • 7 or more years as an exhibiting artist/published scholar with an extensive international record
  • 7 or more years of expertise in Environmental Art, Eco Art and/or Social Practice

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Experience in administration of academic programs and/or private enterprises
  • Extensive creative research demonstrated by local, regional, or national record of public engagement
  • Conversant in contemporary issues of theory and aesthetics, especially as they relate to environmental and ecological art, and an ability to teach related courses
  • Demonstrated excellence in teaching with experience at the undergraduate and graduate level
  • A demonstrated commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and student success, as well as working with broadly diverse communities

More Details: unmjobs.unm.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=85080  

The 50 Shades of Green Conference: Show and Tell Room

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Over the course of the day, we heard from nine arts organisations: ranging in geography, activity and environmental action. There is so much green arts work already taking place in Scotland, but often there is no forum for its discussion: we wanted to host an informal space where speakers and attendees could talk about the simple (or difficult) steps they had taken, ask questions of each other, and spark inspiration and connections.

Summaries of the presentations of each of our speakers can be found below:

Rishaad Moudden, Ayr Gaiety: Capital Project Planning and Staff Engagement

Bravely volunteering as one of the first speakers of the conference, Rishaad talked us through current and future plans for Ayr Gaiety – a B-listed Theatre and Arts centre based in South Ayrshire that host over 200 touring productions every year. Ayr Gaiety is preparing for the final stages of the proposed capital project, and Rishaad told us about the challenges to date, as well as filling us in on his strategies for engaging staff members in more sustainable behaviour – including rollerblading to work!

Kirsty Sommerville, Cryptic: Environmental Sustainability in a Smaller Arts Office

Cryptic is a music, sonic art, and multimedia arts organisation that hosts a series of regular and one-off events and festivals with a national and international audience, run by a small team and based in the CCA in Glasgow. Kirsty spoke to us about the opportunities and challenges presented by this small scale, the sustainability limitations of operating as a tenant within a larger organisation (and how to adapt), and the development of an office environmental policy with a wide reaching impact.

Fiona Doring, Impact Arts: Wonky Carrots and the Urban Green Project

The Cranhill Urban Green project demonstrates an evolution in the sustainable design ideas that Impact Arts has been investigating for a number of years. Fiona told us about the social impact that the project has, in terms of green space empowerment, as well as the aesthetic, edible and practical elements of the project, which combines artistic considerations with our engagement with our surrounds.

Fraser White, Yooz: Social Sustainability and Creative Re-use

Based in Bellshill, Yooz is a reuse and recycling social enterprise which provides creative opportunities for those it works with, as well as providing a materials resource for the local and artistic community. Their show-and-tell item was a massive giant spider planter, created by a member of their team given the creative brief to ‘make something’. As an expert in maximising material capture and re-use, Fraser told us of the variety of items Yooz has received and redistributed: including pantomime sets and antique safes!

Gabrielle Macbeth, Glasgow Women’s Library: Working with Volunteers

Gabrielle discussed the multiple benefits of their PaperGirls scheme. Initiated as a means of increasing the distribution of their events programme, the GWL invite voluntary paper girls to take up paper rounds across the city, dropping off programmes at cafés, venues and community centres which might not be reached otherwise. As well as promoting greener, more active travel modes around Glasgow, the scheme also has a positive social impact, allowing for cyclists to buddy up and discover new parts of the city.

Charlotte Riley, Paragon Music: Claimexpenses.com and Greening the Programme

Charlotte spoke about Paragon’s adoption of ClaimExpenses as well as programme elements of the company’s work which touch upon environmental themes. As an inclusive music company there are important accessibility priorities for the company when it comes to travel and Charlotte sees their role as an important influencing body for partners and participants. She’s embarked upon this first year of using ClaimExpenses as a data gathering exercise, taking on the majority of the work herself before rolling it out to the rest of the team with some aims and objectives for understanding and promoting sustainable travel. She also mentioned a production, ‘Torque’, which showed in 2013 which will be running again next year which looks at renewable energy and the transformation of raw energy into electricity.

Mike Adkins, An Lanntair: Building Improvements and LED Alterations

The group were particularly impressed after Mike revealed how he has not only met the stringent 20% energy reduction target set by management, but is also on track to exceed it through his investment in high-efficiency technology and experimentation with LED lighting for the An Lanntair theatre and arts building. Mike’s tales of testing the effectivity of LED stage and strip lights against staff perceptions and traditional replacement costs proffered a great example of the potential impact of green technology.

Tie MacBeth, Centre for Contemporary Art: Expanding Environmental Policies and Sustainable Creations

As an artistic organisation co-ordinating their own series of activities, a group of artistic tenants, and a café, the CCA’s decision to rewrite their environmental policy in 2014 required input from a large group of internal stakeholders. Tie also told us about their creative solutions to ongoing sustainability issues around their building, presenting the group with a very curious object, later revealed to be a vertical bike storage hook (and a result of an upcycled exhibition install item)!

Emma Beatt, Federation of Scottish Theatre: Procedures, Cocktails and the Recipe for Embedding Sustainability

As an organisation managing a large network and offering a series of trainings and opportunities for the theatre arts sector, FSTs management systems provide an exemplary model for maintaining procedures through staff changes and other irregularities. Emma used the metaphor of different cocktail recipes to explain the useful functions of FSTs procedural database, and we explored how embedding procedural sustainability can impact a wide-ranging organisation.

 


50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector took place on 6 October 2015 at the Pearce Institute in Glasgow. It was Creative Carbon Scotland’s first conference for green arts organisations working to affect their environmental sustainability. A copy of the programme for the event can be found here.

To become part of the Scottish green arts community, and to hear more about events like 50 Shades of Green (as well as our other free training sessions and resources), sign up to the Green Arts Initiative.

 

The post The 50 Shades of Green Conference: Show and Tell Room appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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The 50 Shades of Green Conference: Your Questions Answered

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Our conference was not about pure transmission of information – we wanted our green arts community to get to know each other, to find common points of interaction, and to explore the approach of others to environmental sustainability. However, we know there are those tricky questions which seem particularly difficult to answer and so, as part of the event, we asked for your submissions, with a promise to do our best to answer them directly.

Here are your questions (and our answers!):

1. In a building with elderly strip lighting, is it more expensive to keep switching on and off, than to leave it on for the day?

The consensus from the experts present was… Neither: change the lights to energy efficient LEDs or energy saving lightbulbs! The cost won’t be that great – you may be able to get lamps for the same fittings – and the payback time from reduced electricity costs will probably be in months, not years. In some areas such as toilets or storerooms it’s also worth looking at motion sensors or timers so that lights can’t be left switched on by mistake. Again, the cost will be recoupled very quickly. If you can’t do any of these things, then the experts said switch the lights on and off, don’t leave them switched on.

2. How can we ensure sustainable change in our projects when funding may not be sustainable? With funding periods that sometimes last less than a year, projects can often be piecemeal and ineffective.

This is a perennial problem, not just for sustainability projects. A few tips:

  • Focus on projects that can be accomplished within the funding window you have – some things can be done quickly and will save carbon and money almost immediately.
  • Highlight your sustainability plans and the way in which you are approaching your artistic projects in your applications to funders – this can help gain support.
  • Take a long view and start assuming that something will continue, even if it isn’t the project you planned. If the organisation or company is still there, the sustainability project you planned will still be relevant, even if the artistic or other work that you are doing is different to what was originally planned.

3. Are we doing enough ‘now’?

It depends what we mean by ‘enough’. Clearly we aren’t doing enough, as there is still a problem, Scotland is not quite meeting its carbon reduction targets and at the time of writing the carbon reduction pledges made by countries to the Paris climate change talks aren’t enough to keep the world within the ‘safe’ 2° rise in temperatures. But we’re doing better than we were and it’s a long game. We need to make a start and keep pushing for more. The fact that we were all at the conference was a big improvement on previous years, where nothing like this existed.

4. How can individual artists integrate sustainability into their practice?

  • Look at practices to see how you/they can reduce carbon on travel by travelling more sustainably trains not planes), travelling more effectively (multiple meetings etc), travelling less (video conferencing); switch to lower impact practices and materials (as Edinburgh Printmakers did some years ago when they moved from solvent-based to water-based inks).
  • Work with galleries/theatres/etc and suppliers who are interested in environmental sustainability – seek them out and let them know that you exist.
  • Use your work to engage with the subject.

5. What does the sector look like after another five years of CCS input?

Lower carbon practices will be common. Carbon reporting will be standard. People and companies will have set their own carbon reduction targets related to activity (reductions in carbon per ticket sold or performance or day of exhibition, rather than raw total carbon reductions). Companies’ annual reports will report on environmental impacts – beneficial and harmful – as well as finances. The arts and cultural sector will be recognised both internally and by the wider world as having a crucial role to play in shaping a sustainable Scotland and changing the wider culture that is the way we live to one that is more sustainable.

6. How can CCS pressure Creative Scotland/Scottish Government to increase/raise CO2 reduction targets?

One of our aims for the next year(s) is to widen our focus from the arts and cultural sector to the wider sustainability sector. So Ben is meeting the Minister for Climate Change in November; we’ll be talking more to sustainability organisations and policy-makers as well as arts people and policy-makers. Scotland is pushing anyway at an international level to raise the ambition. CCS is also working with the City of Edinburgh Council and Glasgow City Councils as two major players and will take the opportunity to engage with other authorities as time permits.

7. How can green creatives work together to reduce our carbon footprint?

This conference is a good case in point – the knowledge and the action is happening and out there, and the thing we at CCS need to do is join it up. We’re refurbishing our website to make it more possible for you to talk to each other, rather than us talking to you. We’ll be running more of this sort of event and making it easy for people to exchange knowledge and learning.

I also think we need an artists’ manifesto, almost a movement, and we’ll encourage that if it emerges – I’m not sure we (CCS) are yet in a position to lead that movement or whether it should ever be our job, but we’re here to help if someone wants to get it started.

8. How can we engage the public more with green measures and policies?

I think the best way is to show practically how it is relevant to everything we do: the content of the work we make and the way in which we produce and present it. And then to communicate that regularly and as a matter of course: these are our policies; this is what we are doing; this is how you the public can help us or join us; these are interesting ways of looking at this play, that exhibition, that concert which touch upon climate change.


50 Shades of Green: Stories of Sustainability in the Arts Sector took place on 6 October 2015 at the Pearce Institute in Glasgow. It was Creative Carbon Scotland’s first conference for green arts organisations working to affect their environmental sustainability. A copy of the programme for the event can be found here.

To become part of the Scottish green arts community, and to hear more about events like 50 Shades of Green (as well as our other free training sessions and resources), sign up to the Green Arts Initiative.

The post The 50 Shades of Green Conference: Your Questions Answered appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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ebban an’ flowan: a poetic primer for marine renewable energy

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Alec Finlay recently announced the publication of ebban an’ flowan: a poetic primer on marine renewable energy.  More information below:

ebban an’ flowan
a primer for marine renewable energy
Alec Finlay and Laura Watts, with Alistair Peebles
pb, 56 pages, morning star, 2015; edition of 500 copies

Ebban an’ flowan is the world’s first poetic primer on marine renewable energy. The book focuses on the Orkney islands, as the leading international test site for this nascent energy industry, and expands to reflect on its relationship with the Nordic countries across the sea.

Through both language and technology, the book explores how use is inflected with locality. A number of tide and wave energy devices are illustrated, some in dock, others in the sea, along with an anthology of their characterful names–mixing humour with invocations of classical myth and metamorphosis.

Ebban an’ flowan explores the technical and mythic vocabulary which is evolving alongside marine energy devices. The book offers a unique, creative perspective on this social and technical world by gathering together maritime dialect expressions from across the Norse languages, connecting the older lore of the sea with the new lore of ocean energy generation. An innovative range of poems, maxims, and dictionaries connect tide and wave engineers with the older wisdom of mariners, fisherfolk, and mythic selkies or tangies, to suggest how a language of marine energy may, in some imagined future, grow from words, lodged in collective memory.

Languages also have their tides: the energy of speech, as its sound rises and lulls, is always ebban an’ flowan.

The project is inspired by ongoing social research in collaboration with people and places around marine energy in Orkney, conducted as part of the Alien Energy project at the IT University of Copenhagen.

ebban-an-flowan-image

Laura Watts – writer, poet, ethnographer of futures, and Associate Professor at the IT University of Copenhagen; a writer who brings together the academic and poetic to imagine the future otherwise.

Alec Finlay – poet and artist; he has produced art and writing on all forms of renewable energy since 2005.

Alistair Peebles – artist and writer; the book includes his photographs of installations on Orkney, and a text work.

Price
10.00 GBP
13.00 EUR

ISBN: 978-1904477150

To get your copy please email info@alecfinlay.com, visit amazon.co.uk, or visit the bookshop at alecfinlay.com

Read more on Alec’s blog.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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MASKBOOK.ORG IS ON LINE, WITH OVER 200 MASKED PORTRAITS

Art of Change 21 is happy to officially announce the launch of maskbook.org: a gallery of masked portraits in three languages (French, English and Chinese) that already includes more than 200 participants from all over the world!

Maskbook is the first international and creative action on the link between health and climate, launched by Art of Change 21 for COP21 (The UN Conference on Climate Change, Paris, December2015), supported by the artist Olafur Eliasson and the social entrepreneur Tristan Lecomte.

Whether masks are made with depolluting plants, plastic, electronic waste, with a 3D printer or original objects, the masks come together but are all unique! Diversity of materials but also themes are celebrated: concerns such as ice melt, waste management or biodiversity.
Citizens, artists, designers, makers, ecologists, children, senior citizens, celebrities and are all part of the adventure. Everyone is invited to take action.

PARTICIPATE

Be part of this amazing masked journey.
You can send your portrait by clicking here. You can also share it on social networks by changing your profile picture on Facebook and using the hashtag #Maskbook on Twitter and Instagram.

We are many, join the movement!

De gauche à droite: "Das Auto" porté par Léni Clause (10 ans, France), "Green Mouth" porté par Alma Molsted Andersen (Danemark) et "Filet de Gloire" porté par Cheng Peien (3 ans, Chine)

From left to right: “Das Auto”, by Leni Clause, (10 years old, France), “Green Mouth” by Alma Molsted Andersen (Denmark), “Breathe” by Cheng Peien (3 years old, China)

MASKBOOK’S AGENDA

During COP21 Maskbook will hold an exhibition within the Grand Palais withSolutions COP21 and the Bourget with Générations Climat.
Maskbook will also be at the World March for Climate the 29th of November (come join the masked march with us in Paris!)

MASKBOOK WITH THE CHINESE PEOPLE
In China, Maskbook’s adventure is currently underway. The Maskbook workshops have been launched during Beijing Design Week, as well as a dedicated WeChat page and a launching event will take place the 20th of October in Beijing with the support of the French Embassy in China.

Maskbook on Art of Change 21 social networks    / /

Maskbook project led by Art of Change 21 is labelled “COP21” by the French government and “Paris for the climate” by the City of Paris, under the patronage of the French Ministry of Culture and Communication.

ABOUT ART OF CHANGE 21

First initiative in the world to combine Art, Social Entrepreneurship and Young people, the NGO Art of Change 21 brings together 21 artists, social entrepreneurs and young leaders in climate and environment from 12 countries. Art of Change 21 aims at influencing positively COP21 and the next COPs, and to act in favour of climate and ecological transition thanks to culture, digital and co-creation. The association was founded in 2014 by Alice Audouin, recognized expert in sustainable development and pioneer in France of the link between art and sustainable development.

You want to organize a Maskbook workshop? To welcome a photobooth? To receive an exhibition of portraits or masks? To do a video mapping projection of portraits? You want to support Maskbook? Join our sponsors, ADEME, Orange, Rexel, Generali, Hédonie and Blue Solutions to give the project its international ambition.
Contact us by email: maskbook@artofchange21.com

To download the Press Release : Here