Yearly Archives: 2014

2014 in Review: Green Tease Memories

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Green Tease is a monthly get-together/”after school club” which brings together arts and sustainability folk to discuss the role of the arts in approaching sustainability. 2014 marked the second year of our monthly Glasgow Green Tease gatherings, as well as the launch of an Edinburgh equivalent in August 2014.

Join us in reflecting on the wonderful thoughts and conversations from our Green Tease gatherings in 2014, with lots of energy to look forward to in 2015!

Click on the images below to read more from each of the Green Tease events. Is your Green Tease memory not included below? Share it with us on Twitter using #GreenTease @CCScotland.

 

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NicGreen

 Screen-Shot-2014-07-09-at-18.10.14

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ECO-Drama

The post 2014 in Review: Green Tease Memories appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Anthroposcene Evolution

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

James Eckford Lauder – James Watt and the Steam Engine- the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century – Google Art Project

James Watt didn’t start the anthropocene age, nor is he responsible for climate change, but the invention of the Steam Engine is more than a footnote in history.  The new online journal at www.anthroposcenemanifesto.com (sic) is a platform for research and reflection from social, cultural ecology perspectives.  The introduction reads,

The Anthroposcene Evolution is a dialogue that began at an Environmental Research Network conversation, convened in Glasgow by Alex Benchimol, Hayden Lorimer and Rhian Williams in 2011. As that conversation closed, Chris Maughan suggested that for the arts and humanities  the idea might be better understood in terms of an ‘anthroposcene’, as a social or cultural ecology. All agreed it was an idea that needed to evolve and spiral outwards rather than a manifesto that would solidify and be set in stone. Here-in with many voices, hearts and minds – we establish a evolution of that discourse. In 2014-2015 an international group of contributors have agreed to develop critical variations on this theme for posting and discussion. Some will critique the form of the manifesto itself. We are the first contributors to a this dialogic journal. The membership of this group will change each year at summer solstice.

This online journal embraces all those in the arts and humanities who feel they have a vital role to play in the future. We will establish links to various projects, workshops and exhibitions as this site develops.

The blog has a series of reports that Tim Collins and Reiko Goto wrote after ‘The Anthropocene: Artists and Writers in Critical Dialogue with Nature and Ecosystems held at the Australian National University, Canberra, June 2014: 1 Introduction, 2 Participants, 3 Images, 4Reflections and 5 Key Points.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Dirt? – Call for Entries

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Scientists, Book Artists, and Poets Reflect on Soil and Our Environment

Exhibition dates:    August 6, 2015 to December 30, 2015

Exhibition venue:  Collins Memorial Library, University of Puget Sound,

Tacoma, Washington, USA 98416

Entry Deadline: April 29, 2015

THEME – 2015 is the United Nations International Year of the Soil.  Poets and book artists can join soil scientists in making the soil visible! Soil is the Earth’s delicately structured biological skin—something far more complex than dirt, which is what we buy at garden-supply stores or sweep out of our houses. A multilayered resource that is essential to the water cycle, soil anchors and feeds forests, prairies, and farmed fields. Every terrestrial ecosystem and all our foods sprout from soil, and soil supports many burrowing animals and an amazing biodiversity of microbes, insects, arthropods, and worms—many yet to be scientifically described. For many, soil is sacred ground.  As essential as soil is, few people appreciate this crucial resource or promote its health. Many human practices, such as industrial lead and arsenic pollution threaten human and soil health.  We are seeking book artists and poets who can offer fresh, intriguing perspectives on soil’s value.

BOOK ARTISTS AND POETS:  This exhibition is open to poets and book artists worldwide.

RESOURCES:  We hope that participating in this exhibit will offer book artists and poets a chance to learn more about soil.  Please use the links and resources on this page to learn more about dirt and soil.

ARTIST BOOK ENTRIES: We welcome book and paper arts works created either as an edition or as one-of-a-kind. Artist books, sculptural books, book objects, altered books, zines, broadsides, and sculptural pieces are all encouraged.  We welcome collaborative works between poets, scientists, and book artists.  Because this exhibition will be held in the Collins Memorial library, books that contain living organisms (such as mold, fungus, or loose soil) will not be accepted. Flat fine art prints and photographs are not appropriate for this show, unless they are sculptural or apply some type of book arts process. All artist books are limited to 24 inches in any direction when displayed.

POETRY ENTRIES:  Poems are limited to 25 lines; the total includes the title, 2 blank lines before the body of the poem, epigraphs, and so on. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable, but previously published poems are not eligible. We encourage you to write in your preferred language but, if you do so, to also provide an English translation. If you are submitting an artist book containing one or more of your own poems, the book will be juried only by the book arts jurors unless you also separately submit the poetry for the poetry jurors’ consideration. If you do so, the artist book would be considered one of your possible total of three entries for this exhibition, and each poem would be considered another entry. (If you do not separately submit an original poem that’s in one of your artist books, the poem—which will not be judged—may be a previously published one.)

JURYING:  The Book Arts entries will be juried by Lucia Harrison, PhD, Book Artist, Emeritus Faculty The Evergreen State College and founding member of Puget Sound Book Artists; Susan Aurand, MFA, Visual Artist, Emeritus Faculty The Evergreen State College and recipient of Washington State Arts Commission Art in Public Places Commissions; and Abir Biswas, PhD, Earth Scientist and Member of the Faculty at The Evergreen State College.  The Poetry entries will be juried by William Kupinse, PhD, Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department at The University of Puget Sound;  Sharon A. Sharp, PhD, Poet, Book Artist, Editor, and past-president of the North Carolina Poetry Society, from Boone, North Carolina; and Peggy Burge, MA, MLS, Humanities Librarian at The University of Puget Sound Collins Memorial Library.

ONLINE AND PRINT CATALOGS: The University of Puget Sound will publish a complete online catalog, plus a full-color print catalog of the artist books and poems included in this exhibition. In an effort to avoid entry fees, all submitting artists will be encouraged but not required to purchase a print catalog, via online ordering. Information about the ordering process for the print catalog and its price will be provided at a later date.

DISPLAY OF ARTIST BOOKS AND POETRY: This exhibition will be displayed at The University of Puget Sound Collins Memorial Library and will include the work of book artists, poets, scientists and environmental educators.  We will reproduce the poems as computer-printed broadsides and display them on the walls and in cases.  If the poem is written in a language other than English, both the original poem and the English translation will be displayed.  Due to the public nature of this exhibition space, the artist books will be in locked display cases, unless other arrangements have been made with the artist. Since we feel artist books need to be handled to be fully appreciated, we will be open to artists’ requests for book displays outside of cases, as space allows.

ENTRIES: A maximum of three works total may be submitted by each poet or book artist.  If the entry is an artist book that includes an original poem and the poem is also submitted separately, this will be considered two entries.  Entries must be received online no later than midnight on April 29, 2015.  Artists and poets submitting to this exhibition will be notified via email. The curator reserves the right to decline any accepted artist books upon delivery if the condition or quality is other than represented in the electronic entry.

ONLINE SUBMISSION: All submissions will be made online.https://Dirt.formstack.com/forms/dirt_entry_form  ( please note, if the link does not open, please cut and paste into your browser)

FEES: No Entry Fee

More Info

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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New Resource: Creating and Developing your Environmental Policy

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Wanting to update your current environmental policy for 2015? Or maybe you’re looking to create a new environmental policy and don’t know where to begin- whichever best describes your current situation, our latest resource is a useful read for now and to return to later.

Our Creating and Developing your Environmental Policy resource lists simple questions to ask yourself at the beginning of your policy-creating or policy-updating procedure. The process is also broken down into five simple steps- Involve staff in your policy development, Think about boundaries, Don’t start from scratch, Break it down into manageable chunks and Think about processes.

To read more from this resource, please click here.

Other resources about policies can be found in our Policies Case Study Section.

The post New Resource: Creating and Developing your Environmental Policy appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

33 dagar/33 Days

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Ingrid Book and Carina Hedén, “33 dagar från ett krikonsnår” (“33 Days from a Damson thicket”), 2014

”33 Days” – an exhibition by Ingrid Book and Carina Hedén
20.11 2014—15.2 2015
KONSTHALL C , Cigarrvägen 14, 123 57 Farsta, Sweden
http://www.konsthallc.se

33 dagar/33 Days is an exhibition by Ingrid Book and Carina Hedén, and an investigation into the life of insects existing in a habitat of Damson trees (Prunus Insititia). The first Scandinavian findings of Damson, the “poor man’s plums”, are from the Viking age. The thicket measures 26 x 13 meters and is situated a few hundred meters from Grimeton Radio Station, on the west coast of Sweden. It’s a large-scale radio station for long wave transmissions and wireless telegraphy with the US from the 1920s. The Grimeton Radio Station of Halland is included in UNESCO’s World Heritage list.

The Damson thicket is surrounded by an agricultural landscape with monoculture. It’s a fragment of an old cultural landscape and represents an endangered biological heritage. The insects have been filmed in high resolution (4K), with a camera that “sees” more than the human eye and that reveals a “new” visual reality. Vegetation observed from the inside with the ultrafast reactions of the insects versus standstill and slow-moving time.

A diary of the unexpected behaviour of insects and their encounters (with man and his machines as an alien element) – during a rapidly proceeding summer.

Another work, “DRIFT, what about Callisto?”, questions the usage of pesticides in today’s industrial agriculture.

Works in the exhibition:
Video: “33 dagar från ett krikonsnår” (“33 Days from a Damson thicket”), 115 min, 2014
Video: “DRIFT, what about Callisto?”, 28 min, 2014
Posters: ”Superweeds”

Ingrid Book and Carina Hedén are two artists based in Oslo. In their work – photography, video and installations – they actualize ethical and social questions in the intersections of architecture and urban and regional landscapes. Exhibitions of their work include Midlertidige utopier/Temporary Utopias for the Norwegian Democracy Investigation (Museet for Samtidskunst, Oslo 2003), News from the Field about urban agriculture (Bienale de São Paulo 2004), Militære landskap/Military Landscapes (Festspillutstillingen in Bergen, 2008). They participated in the Moderna Show 2010 with the series of photos Bexells Stenar, ett undangömt monument (Bexell’s Stones, a hidden monument).

The exhibition 33 dagar/33 Days also marks the end of our two-year long exhibition/investigation Sustainability – What Do We Actually mean?*, initiated by the Konsthall C work group in January 2013.

In connection with the opening of the exhibition, Thomas Bøhn, researcher/professor in gene ecology at the University of Tromsø, gave a lecture.

About Thomas Bøhn: “My research interests are focused on the effects of modern biotechnology, and in particularly of genetically modified orgamisms (GMO), on experimental model systems and on real food-webs. At my institution GenØk I’m particularly interested in risk assessment and effect studies of modern biotechnological products. One focus has been on the food quality and ecotoxicology of GM-plants (for example Bt-corn or Roundup Ready soy) in a feeding model with water fleas (Daphnia magna), also in combination with chemical stress factors (herbicides and other chemical pollutants). In the field, I work with the consequences of modern biotechnology on biological diversity and food-webs, both in terrestrial and aquatic systems. I also have a great interest in evolution, biodiversity, ecological interactions and invasion biology.”

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Sustainable Build Weeks

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Learn techniques to help you create your own sustainable building

9th – 13th February, 2nd – 6th March, 7th – 10th April 2015

In additional to the ongoing construction of our beautiful new Linhay, the Land Based Learning Centre, there are a number of other exciting building projects taking shape or about to get underway at Embercombe.

Come and be part of the story of this wonderful place. You will learn new skills that will help you realise the dream of creating your own sustainable build!

A sustainable self-build is a project in which a group of people come together to build a structure (home, barn, bench, stove, etc.) that is built using sustainable building practices and will function in harmony with its environment once built.

No previous experience is needed, but any you have will be welcome.

Tasks for the Week:

The building projects will incorporate and celebrate traditional building techniques at their very best: Frames will always be wood; many are oak, with cob and straw bale walls. Roofs will be examples of reciprocated wood, recycled tiles and green roof practices. Finishes will be sustainable insulation and traditional plaster. This is complimented by a host of environmental features that you will learn about over the week.

You are invited to join the team of master craftsmen and building experts undertaking the techniques and tasks required to complete a number of exciting projects.

The following are examples of techniques that will be undertaken at different stages of different builds. Please note that they suggest you contact the embercombe office on 01647 252983 or email clare [at] embercombe [dot] co [dot] uk to get the specific breakdown of techniques and tasks for each of the dates below. If you are interested in learning a specific skill please contact them for more information.

Cob Building, Straw Bale Lime Render, Lime Washing

Reciprocated Roofing, Green Roof Finishes

Green Oak Carpentry, Wood Carving, Traditional Stone Walling, Sustainable Landscaping

Preliminary Finishing Techniques

Your tutors for the week will teach you new skills, working alongside you to create different elements of the fabulous buildings.

Likely activities (please check with the office foir full course specification)

Green Oak work, Straw Bale Walling, Reciprocal Roofing, Wood Carving, Stone Walling, Pounding, Lime Rendering, Floor Laying, Cobbing, Landscaping, Preliminary Finishing Techniques.

For a detailed outline of the weeks activities and the project that you will be working on please email clare [at] embercombe [dot] co [dot] uk

Programmes for Adults and Children 16 years +

Day and Residential participants welcome. Accommodation is in yurts. Please bring your own bedding (including lots of warm blankets)

Monday 2pm – Friday 4.30pm

If you are joining them on Monday please arrive by 12.00, in time to settle into your yurts. Lunch will at 1pm and we will start at 2pm.

Lunch, hot drinks and snacks will be provided for day volunteers.

Breakfast, lunch and evening meal, hot drinks and snacks will be provided for residential volunteers.

All food is organic, vegetarian, home-cooked and sourced from our site wherever possible.

Costs

PLEASE NOTE that the Sustainable Build Course running from1st – 5th December is FREE OF CHARGE for POOSH MEMBERS please indicate this on your booking form.

A contribution to the cost of meals for those participating in the week is requested.

Day participants: £10 (to include lunch).

Residential participants: £35 per 24 hours (to include full bed and board).

If you would like to and can afford to, they always welcome additional donations to help subsidise the low-cost places we provide and help us with the costs of our work.

Booking

You are welcome to come for just one day or for the full week.

Places are limited: Booking is essential for both day and residential places.

Sustainable Build Week

Please click here to book your place

More Info

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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